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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - SPA7807

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Current Status: SCNS Liaison Notified of Graduate Council Approval - 2016-05-23
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: Required for CSD PhD. Cat Copy Recd. To GC


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    5420 2016-03-16
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Communication Sciences and Disorders BC 121900
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Jennifer Lister 8139749712 jlister@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    SPA 7807 Critical Synthesis of Literature in CSD

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Critical Synthesis in CSD
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    SPA 7802

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    Preparing a systematic literature review based upon the student’s research interest. Students will identify and apply scientific criteria to primarily experimental research and prepare a synthesis of literature with a goal of guiding future research.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    5-10 Ph.D. students plus a few M.S. and Au.D. students each year.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Ph.D. in CSD or related field.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The course will provide students with:

    a. An overview of common approaches to research design and associated quality indicators in Communication Sciences and Disorders

    b. A summary of common approaches to data analysis, statistical evaluation, and data interpretation in the field

    c. An overview of criteria for judging and identifying evidence in communication sciences and disorders and related fields.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    a. Identify criteria appropriate for evaluating evidence for assessment and intervention practices appropriate to different stakeholders in communication sciences and disorders.

    b. Critically analyze and select strategies proposed for evaluating evidence and summarizing scientific literature.

    c. Conduct a comprehensive review of the literature to determine the level of evidence and gaps of knowledge in an area related to assessment or intervention practices in the field.

    d. Prepare a literature synthesis that could be used as a background and significance section of a grant proposal or a journal article.

    C. Major Topics

    Writing Review Papers

    Understanding research in CSD (definitions, different levels of evidence)

    Critically reviewing research (e.g., quality indicators, research design/validity issues, meta-analysis, effect sizes, program evaluations)

    Critical evaluation of single-case experimental designs

    Other types of research

    Different approaches to research

    Reliability of applying evaluation criteria

    Calculating Effect Sizes: Group Designs

    Calculating Effect Sizes: SSEDs

    Calculating effect sizes: group designs

    Summarizing & Interpreting Evaluation Tables

    Presentations of students’ research reviews

    D. Textbooks

    None

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Wolery, M. & Lane, K. L. (2014). Writing tasks. In D. L. Gast & J. R. Ledford (Eds.), Single case research methodology (pp. 50-84). New York: Routledge.

    Gopen, G. D., & Swan, J. A. (1990). The science of scientific writing. American Scientist, 6, 550-559.

    Cook, T.D. (2001). Sciencephobia: Why education researchers reject randomized experiments. Education Next, Fall, 63-68.

    Norcross, J. C., Beutler, L. E., & Levant, R. F. (2006). Evidence-based practices in mental health: Debate and dialogue on the fundamental questions (pp. 13-56). American Psychological Association.

    Kratochwill, T. R., & Stoiber, K.C. (2002). Evidence-based interventions in school psychology: Conceptual foundations of the procedural and coding manual of Division 16 and the Society for the Study of School Psychology Task Force. School Psychology Quarterly, 17, 341-389.

    Lewis-Snyder, G., Kratochwill, T. R., & Stoiber, K.C. (2002). Evidence-based intervention in school psychology: An illustration of task force coding criteria using group-based research design. School Psychology Quarterly, 17, 423-466.

    Gersten et al. (2005). Quality indicators for group experimental and quasi-experimental research in special education. Exceptional Children, 71, 149-164.

    Horner, R.H. Carr, E.G., Halle, J., McGee, M, Odom, S., & Wolery, M. (2005). The use of single subject research to identify evidence-based practice in special education. Exceptional Children, 71, 165–179.

    Goldstein, H., Lackey, K. C., & Schneider, N. J. (2014). A new framework for systematic reviews: Application to social skills interventions for preschoolers with autism. Exceptional Children, 80, 262-280.

    Thompson, B., Diamond, K., McWilliam, R., Snyder, P., & Snyder, S. (2005). Evaluating the Quality of Evidence from Correlational Research for Evidence-based Practice. Exceptional Children, 71, 181-194.

    Brantlinger, E., Jimenez, R., Klingner, J., Pugach, M., & Richardson, V. (2005). Qualitative studies in special education. Exceptional Children, 71, 195-207.

    Chorpita, B. F., Daleiden, E. L., Ebesutani, C., Young, J., Becker, K. D.,…Starace, N. (2011). Evidence-based treatments for children and adolescents: An updated review of indicators of efficacy and effectiveness. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 18, 154-172.

    Cook, B. G., Tankersley, M., & Landrum, T. J. (2009). Determining evidence-based practices in special education. Exceptional Children, 75, 365-383.

    Thompson, B. (2007). Effect sizes, confidence intervals, and confidence intervals for effect sizes. Psychology In The Schools, 44(5), 423-432.

    Shadish, W. R., Hedges, L. V., Horner, R. H., & Odom, S. L. (2015). The role of between-case effect size in conducting, interpreting, and summarizing single-case research. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Research, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.

    Parker, R. I., Vannest, K. J., & Davis, J. L. (2011). Effect size in single-case research: A review of nine overlap techniques. Behavior Modification, 35, 303-322.

    Maggin, D. M., Swaminathan, H., Rogers, H. J., O’Keeffe, B. V., Sugai, G., & Horner, R.H. (2011). A generalized least squares regression approach for computing effect sizes in single-case research: Application examples. Journal of School Psychology, 49, 301-321.

    Thompson, B. (2007). Effect sizes, confidence intervals, and confidence intervals for effect sizes. Psychology In The Schools, 44(5), 423-432.

    Chorpita, B. F., Daleiden, E. L., Ebesutani, C., Young, J., Becker, K. D.,…Starace, N. (2011). Evidence-based treatments for children and adolescents: An updated review of indicators of efficacy and effectiveness. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 18, 154-172.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    1. Attendance and participation in class discussion (10%). All students are expected to contribute to the selection and refinement process during class discussions. Each student’s participation will be scored using a 3-point scale (3=strong, 2=moderate, 1=weak) at each class meeting, and a grade will be assigned at the end of the semester based on the combined scores.

    Score Criteria

    3 (strong) Contribution that moves the discussion forward and expands upon issues relevant to the discussion topic

    2 (moderate) Contribution that does not move the discussion forward, for example due to errors in fact or reasoning or by reiterating established points

    1 (weak) No contribution or contribution that is primarily off the discussion topic.

    2. Presentation and discussion of a set of Evaluation Criteria or Effect Size statistics (25%)

    Students will select a set of criteria adopted by a professional or scientific organization/ agency to present to the class. In addition to describing the criteria and how they are applied, the student will lead a discussion of pros and cons of the approach. They also will present a critical analysis of a published systematic review using that approach. A scoring rubric will be developed based on clarity of the visual presentation and handout (1/3), completeness of the description of approach (1/3), and thoroughness of critique of approach (1/3).

    3. Critical review of research (65%)

    a. Select a topic of interest to conduct a systematic review.

    b. Compile a comprehensive list of relevant articles that are suitable for review.

    c. Develop a table for summarizing critical features of the articles reviewed.

    d. Develop a table for applying evaluation criteria to individual articles and establish reliability of the ratings provided.

    e. Summarize results of the analysis of articles. Evaluate the state-of-the-evidence for the chosen clinical practice or behavioral phenomenon based on a systematic review of the literature and develop recommendations for future research based on findings.

    f. Complete manuscript using APA Style suitable for submission for publication.

    [A scoring rubric will be further developed to reflect each of the following criteria: a) specification of article selection criteria; b) comprehensiveness of reference list; c) appropriate selection of evaluation criteria; d) completion of results tables; e) adequacy of narrative summary; f) relating results to extant literature; g) overall organization and conformity to APA Style; and h) clarity of writing.]

    A score of 0 will be assigned to any assignment that is not completed or for participation in case of an unexcused absence.

    Grading Scale

    The plus/minus grading system will be utilized. The following grades are possible:

    Letter GPA Final grade

    A 4.0 93-100

    A- 3.7 90-93

    B+ 3.3 87-89

    B 3.0 83-86

    B- 2.7 80-82

    C+ 2.3 77-79

    C 2.0 73-76

    C- 1.7 70-72

    D+ 1.3 67-69

    D 1.0 63-66

    D- 0.7 60-63

    F -- below 60

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    1. Attendance and participation in class discussion (10%). All students are expected to contribute to the selection and refinement process during class discussions. Each student’s participation will be scored using a 3-point scale (3=strong, 2=moderate, 1=weak) at each class meeting, and a grade will be assigned at the end of the semester based on the combined scores.

    2. Presentation and discussion of a set of Evaluation Criteria or Effect Size statistics (25%)

    Students will select a set of criteria adopted by a professional or scientific organization/ agency to present to the class. In addition to describing the criteria and how they are applied, the student will lead a discussion of pros and cons of the approach. They also will present a critical analysis of a published systematic review using that approach. A scoring rubric will be developed based on clarity of the visual presentation and handout (1/3), completeness of the description of approach (1/3), and thoroughness of critique of approach (1/3).

    3. Critical review of research (65%)

    a. Select a topic of interest to conduct a systematic review.

    b. Compile a comprehensive list of relevant articles that are suitable for review.

    c. Develop a table for summarizing critical features of the articles reviewed.

    d. Develop a table for applying evaluation criteria to individual articles and establish reliability of the ratings provided.

    e. Summarize results of the analysis of articles. Evaluate the state-of-the-evidence for the chosen clinical practice or behavioral phenomenon based on a systematic review of the literature and develop recommendations for future research based on findings.

    f. Complete manuscript using APA Style suitable for submission for publication.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Regular attendance in class is required, which is essential to ensuring a balanced and comprehensive discussion of course materials and to maintain continuity in group discussions. Any absences should be discussed with the instructor in advance, and they should be well justified and kept to a minimum. Students are expected to arrive at class on time and remain in the classroom until class is completed. If there are special circumstances in which a student needs to arrive late or leave early, these should be discussed with the instructor in advance.

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Make-up work will be allowed per instructor approval.

    As in other professional disciplines, the reputations of the fields of behavioral and community sciences hinge on the collective integrity of persons working in them. It is assumed that graduate students taking this class will live up to the highest levels of academic honesty. If the instructor has reason to believe a student is cheating or being academically dishonest, proceedings may be instituted to have the student dismissed from the program and/or the University (see current USF catalog). An F received as a result of academic dishonesty can automatically provide grounds for dismissal from graduate programs at USF. A class cannot be repeated in which a student receives an F as a result of academic dishonesty is not repeatable. To ensure academic integrity, plagiarism tracking software (Turnitin) will be used to examine all written assignments, including required papers. USF has an account with this automated plagiarism detection service, which allows instructors to submit student assignments to be checked for plagiarism. Written materials are automatically compared with a very large database of journal and web articles and previously submitted papers. The instructor will receive a report for each set of written material submitted, indicating the precise proportion of a student's paper that has been plagiarized or duplicated from another source. Students are required to be familiar with the Academic Integrity of Students Policy (document # USF3.027: (http://regulationspolicies.usf.edu/regulations/pdfs/regulation-usf3.027.pdf)

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Ph.D. in CSD


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.