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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - MHS7720

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2016-07-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: Required - PhD in BCS. To GC. Approved; To USF Sys 4/21/16; to SCNS after 4/28/16. Nmbr 7721 apprd as 7720 eff 7/1/16


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    5330 2015-11-19
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Mental Health Law & Policy BC 5830
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Kathleen Moore 9742295 kamoore@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    MHS 7720 Proseminar in Behavioral & Community Sciences

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? Y
    Is this course repeatable? Y
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) S - S/U Only
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Proseminar I-III
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    Reading, discussion, and application of topics related to professional development of doctoral students: teaching at the college level, dissertation selection and literature review processes, developing research agenda, and building professional skills.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course will be taken by all students in the proposed Ph.D. in Behavioral & Community Sciences as a required core course. In addition, it will be open to students in any graduate program for whom it may be applicable.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    The minimum requirement for teaching this course is a Ph.D. degree as well as experience teaching professional issues.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    Proseminar will consist of reading, discussion, and application of a variety of topics central to professional development of doctoral students. The objectives are to provide students with:

    1.Skills to teach at the college or university level

    2.Knowledge in planning and organizing an oral research presentation

    3.Knowledge of publishing articles; grant writing; and the grant process

    4.Knowledge about career options in interdisciplinary behavioral sciences

    5.Skills in professional development (time management, balance career/family, etc)

    B. Learning Outcomes

    By the conclusion of the course, students will:

    1.Demonstrate effective teaching skills in classroom and on-line learning

    2.Complete a literature review for dissertation proposal

    3.Demonstrate oral skills by presenting findings from research proposal

    4.Identify submission requirements for publication of dissertation research

    5.Understand the grant review process

    6.Complete a Curriculum CV to reflect readiness for a career in interdisciplinary sciences

    C. Major Topics

    Topics related to the professional development of doctoral students: teaching at the college or university level, dissertation topic selection and literature review processes, developing a research agenda, and building professional skills such as career networking, publication in peer-reviewed journals, grant writing, and time management.

    D. Textbooks

    McKeachie, W.J. (2006). McKeachie’s teaching tips (12th ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

    Lunenberg, F.C. & Irby, B.J. (2007). Writing a successful thesis or dissertation: Tips and strategies for students in social and behavioral sciences. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

    Gray, P & Drew, D. (2012). What They Didn’t Teach you in Graduate School, 2th Edition. Stylus: Sterling, VA.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    In addition to the textbooks, students will select two articles in their area of research interest and critique the articles based on a theoretical model.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Students are expected to attend all classes, read assigned materials, complete writing assignments, initiate discussions, and participate by sharing personal experiences and professional judgments. This professional seminar series will be graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Proseminar I - Instruction Component Course Requirements: Students are expected to attend all classes, read assigned materials, complete writing assignments, initiate discussions, and participate by sharing personal experiences and professional judgments. For the teaching component, students must complete the following:

    • Class Attendance and Participation (25 points). All students are expected to attend class each week and participate in class discussions. A rubric will be developed in more detail when the class is first held and will be based on the rubric scale adapted from: Rubric to Assess Discussion Performance in Graduate Seminars. Participation will be evaluated on requirements such as: (1) Verbal contributions demonstrating material has been read, (2) Leadership demonstrated in managing discussion flow and encouraging contributions by others, (3) Respect shown for opinion of others, and (4) Actively listens to others and participates in class activities.

    • Class Activities and Assignments (75 points): All students are expected to complete activities/assignments on time and as specified in the syllabus. A rubric will be developed in more detail when the class is first held and will be based on the rubric scale adapted from: Graduate Outcome Teaching Rubric. The activities/assignments are as follows:

    o Instructional Strategy (15 points): Write a plan for helping students meet a learning objective. A scoring rubric will be further developed to reflect: (1) comprehensiveness of learning plan (20%), (2) appropriate selection of instructional plan (20%), (3) adequacy of learning plan (20%), (4) overall organization (20%), and (5) clarity of writing (20%).

    o Evaluation of Learning (15 points): Prepare descriptions of various ways of evaluating learning appropriate for students enrolled in courses being taught now and in the future. A scoring rubric will be further developed to reflect: (1) reflections of what was learned (50%), and (2) teaching techniques used (50%).

    o Undergraduate Class Observations (15 points): Observe three undergraduate classes and keep records of observations: (1) two different undergraduate classes (10 points), and (2) an online undergraduate class (5 points). A scoring rubric will be further developed to reflect: (1) reflections of what was learned (50%), and (2) teaching techniques used (50%).

    o Video Assessment (30 points): Students will develop a video teaching a class. Arrangements will be made for simulated teaching experiences if a real teaching situation is not possible. A scoring rubric will be further developed to reflect: (1) students’ individual strengths and prior knowledge (25%), (2) uses resources effectively, including appropriate technology (25%), (3) incorporates critical/creative thinking, problem solving, and collaboration (25%), and (4) uses a variety of appropriate instructional strategies to meet the needs of all students (25%).

    Proseminar II – Research Component Course Requirements: Students are expected to attend all classes, read assigned materials, complete writing assignments, initiate discussions, and participate by sharing personal experiences and professional judgments. For the research component, students must complete the following:

    • Class Attendance and Participation (25 points). All students are expected to attend class each week and participate in class discussions. A rubric will be developed in more detail when the class is first held and will be based on the rubric scale adapted from: Rubric to Assess Discussion Performance in Graduate Seminars. Participation will be evaluated on requirements such as: (1) Verbal contributions demonstrating material has been read, (2) Leadership demonstrated in managing discussion flow and encouraging contributions by others, (3) Respect shown for opinion of others, and (4) Actively listens to others and participates in class activities.

    • Class Activities and Assignments (75 points): All students are expected to complete activities/assignments on time and as specified in the syllabus. A rubric will be used to grade the protocol based on the rubric scale adapted from: Proseminar Action Research Presentation. The activities/assignments are as follows:

    o Research Plan Development (15 points): Students will identify three research areas they would be interested in pursuing in graduate school. Students will draft and finalize a research plan for one of their proposed research areas. A scoring rubric will be further developed to reflect: (1) identifies and summarizes the problem to be studied (20%), (2) identifies existing literature (20%), (3) draws inferences from previous literature (20%), (4) overall organization and conformity to APA Style (20%), and (5) clarity of writing (20%).

    o Article Critiques (20 points): Students will write two article critiques (10 points each) using a format that will be discussed in class. A scoring rubric will be further developed to reflect: (1) summarizes the context and content of the selected articles (25%), (2) identifies and describes reaction to the article (25%), (3) overall organization and conformity to APA Style (25%), and (4) clarity of writing (25%).

    o Article Critique Presentation (15 points): Students will present in class a summary and critique of one of the articles of their choosing. A scoring rubric will be further developed to reflect: (1) clarity of the presentation (25%), (2) good description of approach (25%), (3) thoroughness of article critique (25%), and (4) nonverbal skills such as eye contact and body language (25%).

    o Research Presentation (30 points): Students will conduct a 15-minute presentation of a research project identified during the semester that is related to a current research interest. A scoring rubric will be further developed to reflect: (1) knowledge of the research subject (25%), (2) information is well communicated and summarized well (25%), (3) review of existing literature has been summarized (25%), and (4) nonverbal skills such as eye contact and body language (25%).

    Proseminar III - Professional Issues Course Requirements: Students are expected to attend all classes, read assigned materials, complete writing assignments, initiate discussions, and participate by sharing personal experiences and professional judgments. For the professional issues component, students must complete the following:

    • Class Attendance and Participation (25 points). All students are expected to attend class each week and participate in class discussions. A rubric will be developed in more detail when the class is first held and will be based on the rubric scale adapted from: Rubric to Assess Discussion Performance in Graduate Seminars. Participation will be evaluated on requirements such as: (1) Verbal contributions demonstrating material has been read, (2) Leadership demonstrated in managing discussion flow and encouraging contributions by others, (3) Respect shown for opinion of others, and (4) Actively listens to others and participates in class activities.

    • Class Activities and Assignments (75 points): All students are expected to complete activities/assignments on time and as specified in the syllabus. A rubric will be used to grade the protocol based on the rubric scale adapted from: Proseminar Action Research Presentation. The activities/assignments are as follows:

    o Vita Development (20 points): Students will develop two versions of current vita (10 points) and an expanded vita (10 points) that reflect accomplishments at the time of graduation.

    o Interview (20 points): Students will identify and conduct one-hour interview with a professional who works in area they would like to pursue. They will learn about both the person and their professional role including work, career path, and professional orientation. A written overview of the interview will examine: (1) reflections of what was learned (50%), and (2) how this might relate to own career path (50%).

    o Job Prospect Identification (5 points): Students will explore advertisements for academic or research positions to select jobs that might be of interest to them. Students will draft a cover letter for an advertised position of interest.

    o Program Colloquia (30 points): Students will attend two professional colloquia during the semester (5 points each) in their area of study. Students will prepare and present an overview of the colloquia that they observed (20 points). A scoring rubric will be developed to reflect: (1) overview of colloquia (25%), (2) how the presentation might relate to practice/research (25%), (3) theories discussed during the presentation (25%), and (4) conclusions from presentation (25%).

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Assignments that are not turned in will receive a grade of 0. Assignments turned in late (i.e., after date/time on syllabus), will be eligible to receive a maximum of only 50% of the possible points for that assignment unless otherwise specified in the syllabus. In-class assignments must be completed in class and not eligible for late submission. Refer to the USF Academic Integrity Regulation for related information: http://www.ugs.usf.edu/pdf/cat0910/08acapol.pdf

    J. Program This Course Supports

    This course supports the proposed Ph.D. in Behavioral & Community Sciences.


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    This course could be applicable to any graduate program in behavioral sciences (e.g., Aging Studies, Social Work, Criminology, Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health, Applied Behavior Analysis, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Sociology, Anthropology, as well as graduate programs in Education and Public Health).



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.