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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - ATR6116

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2015-12-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: For MS in Adv Athl Training - required. GC Approved 10/12/15. To USF Sys 10/12/15. To SCNS 10/28/15. Approved effective 12/1/15


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    5235 2015-05-18
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Medicine MD 613900
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Rebecca Lopez 8133969078 rlopez@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    ATR 6116 Preventing Sudden Death in Youth Sports Settings

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Preventing Sudden Death Youth
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    O - Online (100% online) 100

    Prerequisites

    ATR 6236 Pediatric Sports Medicine

    Corequisites

    n/a

    Course Description

    Preventing Sudden Death in Youth Sports Settings will familiarize students with the common causes of fatalities in young athletes. This course is limited to those in the post-professional athletic training program (M.S. in MS, Athl Training concentration


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course is being added to the MS in Medical Sciences, Athletic Training Concentration. This program will soon be a stand alone master's program under the Dept of Orthopedics. There is an increased need for athletic trainers to receive additional information/training on the topic of sudden death in sport. In particular, this graduate program's focus is on youth sports injury, and there is a lack of information on preventing sudden death in this population. In the youth sport settings, young athletes die every year. Every attempt should be made to ensure that athletic trainers are knowledgeable and prepared for the prevention, recognition and management of the life-threatening conditions often seen in the youth sports setting. As part of this post-professional program, this course is intended to better prepare those athletic trainers already working clinically in various sport settings.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    This course should be taught by an individual that has a terminal degree (i.e. PhD, EdD, DSc, DPT, MD, DO). The instructor should also be a certified athletic trainer or other similar training, specific to the prevention of sudden death in sport.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    Course objectives:

    1. Discuss the various administrative means of preventing sudden death in youth in sport settings.

    2. Explain the methods of managing life-threatening injuries/conditions, as they relate to cardiac conditions, exertional heat stroke, and other common causes of sudden death in youth sports.

    3. Discuss the components of an emergency action plan.

    4. Explain the medical conditions that are most likely to result in sudden in youth athletes.

    5. Discuss the criteria for a safe return to play following a life-threatening injury or condition.

    6. Identify potential resources when dealing with career-ending injuries in the youth athlete population.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    At the completion of the course, students will be able to:

    1. Describe the strategies an athletic trainer should utilize for the prevention of sudden death in youth sports.

    2. Identify methods of managing a life-threatening injury or condition (i.e cardiac condition, exertional heat stroke, sickle cell trait-associated collapse, and others)

    3. Design and present an emergency action plan (EAP) that could be used in a youth sports setting.

    4. Discuss the top 10 reasons athletes die in youth sports settings.

    5. Prepare a return to play protocol following a life-threatening condition in youth sports setting and present the protocol to the class.

    6. Discuss means of assisting a youth athlete that has suffered a career-ending injury or condition.

    C. Major Topics

    The major course topics will include: cardiac arrest and other life-threatening cardiac conditions, exertional heat stroke, exertional sickling, traumatic brain injury, spinal injury, lightning, hyponatremia, diabetes, asthma, anaphylaxis, and other life-threatening conditions.

    D. Textbooks

    1. Rehberg RS. Sports Emergency Care, 2nd ed. SLACK Inc; Thorofare, NJ, 2013.

    2. Assigned readings from peer-reviewed journals. These readings will be made available via Canvas.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Assigned Readings and Assignments

    Module 1: Introduction to Emergency Management in Youth Sports

    - READINGS:

    o Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 1: Introduction to Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 2: Preparing for Sports Emergencies

    o NATA Inter-Association Task Force for Preventing Sudden Death in Secondary School Athletics, 2013

    - ASSIGNMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #1

    Module 2: Epidemiology of Sudden Death in Youth Sports

    - READINGS:

    o Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 15: Emergency Care Considerations for the Pediatric and Youth Athlete

    o Kerr ZY et al. Epidemology of exertional heat illness among U.S. high school athletes. Am J Prev Med. 2013;44(1):8-14.

    o Guerriero RM, et al. Epidemiology, trends, assessment and management of sport-related concussion in United States high schools. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2012;24(65):696-701.

    - ASSIGNMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #2

    Module 3: Emergency Action Plans in Youth Sports Settings

    - READINGS:

    o Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 2: Preparing for Sports Emergencies

    o NATA Inter-Association Task Force for Preventing Sudden Death in Secondary School Athletics, 2013

    o NATA Inter-Association Recommendations on Emergency Preparedness and Management of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in High School and College Athletic Programs, 2007

    o NATA Consensus: Appropriate medical care for secondary school-age athletes, 2003

    - ASSIGMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #3

    Module 4: Airway, Breathing & Cardiac Emergencies

    - READINGS:

    o NATA Position Statement: Preventing sudden death in sports, 2012

    o NATA Inter-Association Recommendations on Emergency Preparedness and Management of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in High School and College Athletic Programs, 2007

    - ASSIGMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #4

    Module 5: Traumatic Brain Injuries in Youth Athletes

    - READINGS:

    o Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 8: Management of Traumatic Brain Injury

    o Dompier TP et al. Incidence of concussion during practice and games in youth, high school, and collegiate American football players. JAMA Pediatr. 2015 May 4. [Epub ahead of print].

    o Kerr HA, Mjaanes JM. Concerns about concussion rates in female youth soccer. JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(10):967-8.

    o NATA Position Statement: Management of Concussion, 2014

    - ASSIGMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #5

    Module 6: Spine Injuries & Other Traumatic Injuries in Youth Athletes

    - READINGS:

    o Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 6: Management of Spinal Injuries

    • Chapter 9: Injuries to the Thoracic Region

    • Chapter 10: Abdominal Injuries

    - ASSIGMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #6

    Module 7: Exertional Heat Stroke, Sickle Cell Trait-Associated Collapse, and Exertional Rhabdomyolysis

    - READINGS:

    o Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 12: General Medical Conditions

    • Chapter 13: Environmental Emergencies

    - ASSIGMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #7

    Module 8: Asthma & Diabetes in Young Athletes

    - READINGS:

    o Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 12: General Medical Conditions

    o NATA Position Statement: Management of the athlete with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, 2007

    o NATA Position Statement: Management of asthma in athletes, 2005

    o NATA Position Statement: Preventing sudden death in sports, 2012

    - ASSIGMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #8

    Module 9: Anaphylactic Shock, Lightning & Other Environmental Threats

    - READINGS:

    o Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 13: Environmental Emergencies

    o NATA Position Statement: Lightning Safety for Athletics & Recreation, 2013

    - ASSIGNMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #9

    Module 10: Incorporating Evidence-Based Emergency Management into Clinical Practice in Youth Sports Settings

    - READINGS:

    o Sports Emergency Care

    • Chapter 15: Emergency Care Considerations for the Pediatric & Youth Athlete

    o NATA Position Statement: Preparticipation Physical Examinations and Disqualifying Conditions, 2014

    o NATA Inter-Association Task Force for Preventing Sudden Death in Secondary School Athletics, 2013

    - ASSIGMENTS:

    o Discussion Board

    o Quiz #10

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Student grades will be based on the following:

    Discussions 40%

    Quizzes: 25%

    Written Paper: 20%

    Final Exam 15%

    Final course grade will be based on a percentage performance basis for the course using the following grading scale:

    A 92-100 A- 89-91

    B+ 87-88 B 82 – 86 B- 79-81

    C+ 77-78 C 72–76 C- 69-71

    D+ 67-68 D 62-–66 D- 59-61

    F

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Reading Assignments:

    Specific chapters in the textbooks and peer-reviewed journal articles required for the course will be assigned for each module (Assigned Readings and Assignments will be posted on Canvas). The reading assignments are the primary means by which each student will acquire the core content of the course. It is essential that students complete the reading assignments for comprehension early in each unit.

    Class Discussions:

    Class discussion topics will be introduced throughout the course. All students are expected to participate in, and in some cases, lead the class discussions. Question and answer activities, as well as identification of valuable web resources will be the focus of the discussions. Discussions are asynchronous, meaning that participants post messages to discussion lists. The advantage of this is that participants do not have to find a time when everyone can log in simultaneously. However, because exchange of ideas is so important, participants will have to be working on the same topics at roughly the same time. It is not possible, therefore, for participants to work entirely at their own pace, for example by doing all coursework in the first few days of the course or by leaving all coursework until the end. Therefore, it is imperative that you be able to participate in the discussions on a regular basis during the course. If you have questions about whether the course will be flexible enough for your purposes, please contact the course instructor. Students are expected to be active members of the class, and therefore each student should be able to log into the class at least twice a week to check for announcements and to participate in the class discussions. At a minimum, students will be required to respond to each discussion prompt, adding meaningful reflection or information in each post (short comments such as “I agree” or “Good point” do not count towards your participation in the discussion). The expectation is that you give your response to the discussion by Wednesday and respond to your classmates/group members at least twice. Simply meeting this minimum expectation does not ensure full credit for that module, but would receive an average score. To receive full credit, participation in the discussion must be thorough and thoughtful (i.e. adding references when necessary and answering all questions posed to you by your classmates). Students may also be asked to respond/comment to peer discussion posts. Please note deadline information for each module’s discussion assignments.

    Written Paper:

    The submission of a written paper will be required as part of the completion for class credit. This paper will be a research-based reflection of your knowledge as it pertains to a particular life-threatening condition in youth sports settings. A grading rubric will be provided in advance so the expectations are clearly outlined. This paper is due electronically via an email to xxxx@health.usf.edu on Friday, August xx, 201x by 11:59 PM (Eastern Standard Time).

    Quizzes:

    For each module, a quiz will be posted on Canvas with which students can self-test their level of comprehension of the reading assignment. The quizzes can be taken as many times as you wish (within the module’s timeframe) so that you can determine your level of understanding of the reading material. Grades will be recorded in the grade book for each quiz.

    Examinations:

    Comprehensive Final Exam:

    This exam will be comprehensive of all material covered during the entire course. The specific days and time during which the Final exam will be available will be identified in the course schedule. You will be able to take the Final exam only once and a time limit to complete the exam will be in operation.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Due dates and times are strictly enforced. Unless arrangements are made with the Instructor prior to an assignment due date, students will receive a 0 for any late assignments.

    Academic Integrity of Students

    Please review USF's policy regarding Academic Integrity as it applies to academic dishonesty, cheating, plagiarism, and punishment for these.

    Reference: USF Regulation USF 3.027 - The following is the portion of the Regulation pertaining to graduate students. To read the entire regulation, go to: http://regulationspolicies.usf.edu/regulations/pdfs/regulation-usf3.027.pdf

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MS in Medical Sciences, Athletic Training Concentration


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    None. This course is only intended for students in this advanced athletic training program.



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.