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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EDG7066

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2016-06-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: Elective for PhD in C&I - Teacher Ed Conc. To GC. LO updated. To GC 1/26/16. Repeat twice? Differentiat content or chg repeat. Emailed 3/11/16. Course is NOT repeatable. GC approved. Nmbr 7224 apprd as 7066 Eff 6/1/16


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    5141 2014-11-07
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Childhood Education & Literacy Studies ED
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Jennifer Jacobs 8139747522 jjacobs8@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EDG 7066 Critical Pedagogy in Teacher Education

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 1

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Critical Pedagogy
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    Introductions to key concepts and frameworks related to critical pedagogy. Graduate students will develop connections between theoretical exploration to teaching and scholarship in teacher education.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    A major effort within teacher education is to support preservice teachers in creating equitable learning environments for students, particularly those who have been marginalized within the education system. In order to support preservice teachers in this process, the next generation of teacher educators will need to understand critical theoretical frameworks in order to explain and understand the reasons behind inequities in education. They will then need to learn about ways to facilitate learning of preservice teachers in this area. This takes a great deal of critical self-reflection and development of critical methods to support critical reflection and action.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 1 time

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    doctorate


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    -Engage in the process of conscientization by developing greater sociocultural consciousness looking at the self through the lenses of history, biology, culture, and politics

    -Understand key concepts and principles of critical theory, critical pedagogy, and social justice education as well as major writers in these areas

    -Research a key area at the intersection of critical pedagogy and teacher education to inform their own scholarship and teaching by reading and synthesizing the literature

    -Engage in praxis by engaging in reflective action within research, teaching, or service at the intersection of critical pedagogy and teacher education

    -Improve skills in writing coherent, thoughtful, and scholarly essays

    -Develop skills and confidence in facilitating and participating in scholarly discourse with peers.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    After successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    -Engage in the process of conscientization by developing greater sociocultural consciousness looking at the self through the lenses of history, biology, culture, and politics

    -Understand key concepts and principles of critical theory, critical pedagogy, and social justice education as well as major writers in these areas

    -Research a key area at the intersection of critical pedagogy and teacher education to inform their own scholarship and teaching by reading and synthesizing the literature

    -Engage in praxis by engaging in reflective action within research, teaching, or service at the intersection of critical pedagogy and teacher education

    -Improve skills in writing coherent, thoughtful, and scholarly essays

    -Develop skills and confidence in facilitating and participating in scholarly discourse with peers.

    C. Major Topics

    What is critical pedagogy?

    Critical Reflection on Historical Self

    What is critical pedagogy?

    -Key concepts

    -History

    Critical reflection on biological self

    Class, Sexuality, Disability, and Intersectionality

    Critical reflection on cultural self

    Critical Race Theory

    Critical reflection on political self

    Developing a Critical Pedagogy in Teacher Education

    Research in Critical Pedagogy and Teacher Education

    D. Textbooks

    Darder, A., Baltodano, M.P, Torres, R.D. (Eds.). (2009). The critical pedagogy reader.(2nd edition). New York: Routledge.

    Freire, P. (1971). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Herder & Herder.

    Hinchey, P.H. (2010). Finding freedom in the classroom: A practical introduction to critical theory (revised edition). New York: Peter Lang.

    Kumashiro, K.K. (2009). Against common sense: Teaching and learning toward social justice. New York: Routledge.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Additional Readings

    Class Three:

    Gorski, P.C. (2008). Peddling poverty for profit: Elements of oppression in Ruby Payne’s framework. Equity & Excellence in Education, 41(1), 130-148.

    Museus, S.D., & Griffin, K.A. (2011). Mapping the margins in higher education: On the promise of intersectionality frameworks in research and discourse. New Directions for Institutional Research, 151, 5-13.

    Vavrus, M.(2009). Sexuality, schooling, and teacher identity formation: A critical pedagogy for teacher education. Teaching and Teacher Education, 25, 383-390.

    Class Four:

    Smith-Maddox, R., & Solarzano, D.G. (2002). Using critical race theory, Paulo Freire’s problem-posing method, and case study research to confront race and racism in education. Qualitative Inquiry, 8(1), 66-84.

    Solarzano, D.G., & Bernal, D.D. (2001). Examining transformational resistance through a critical race and latcrit theory framework: Chicana and Chicano students in an urban context. Urban Education, 36(3), 308-342.

    Yosso, T.J. (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth. Race, Ethnicity, and Education, 8(1), 69-91.

    Class 7

    Grant, C.A., & Agosto, V. (2008). Teacher capacity and social justice in teacher education. In M. Cochran-Smith, S. Feiman-Nemser, D.J. McIntyre, & K.E. Demers. (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Teacher Education, Third Ed. (pp.175-200). New York: Routledge/Taylor Francis Group and The Association of Teacher Educators.

    Villegas, A.M. & Lucas, T. (2002). Preparing culturally responsive teachers: Rethinking the curriculum. Journal of Teacher Education, 53(1), 20-32.

    Class 8

    Chubbuck, S. M. (2010). Individual and structural orientations in socially just teaching: Conceptualization, Implementation, and Collaborative Effort. Journal of Teacher Education, 61(3), 197-210.

    Kraehe, A.M., & Brown, K.D. (2011) Awakening teachers’ capacities for social justice within/in arts-based inquiries. Equity & Excellence in Education, 44(4), 488-511.

    McDonald, M.A. (2008). The pedagogy of assignments in social justice teacher education. Equity & Excellence in Education, 41(2), 151-167.

    Class 9

    Gorski, P.C., Osei-Kofi, N., Zenkov, K., & Sapp, J.(2013). Introduction. In P.C. Gorski, K. Zenkov, N. Osei-Kofi, & J. Saff. (Eds.) Cultivating social justice teachers: How teacher educators have helped students overcome cognitive bottlenecks and learn critical social justice concepts. (pp.1-10). Sterling, VA: Stylus.

    Ladson-Billings, G. (2011). Asking the right questions: A research agenda for studying diversity in teacher education. In A. Ball, & C.A. Tyson’s (Eds.) Studying Diversity in Teacher Education. (pp.385-398). New York: Rowan & Littlefield.

    Olsen, B. (2011). “I am large: I contain multitudes”: Teacher identity as a useful frame for research, practice, and diversity in teacher education. In A. Ball, & C.A. Tyson’s (Eds.) Studying Diversity in Teacher Education. (pp. 257-273). New York: Rowan & Littlefield.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Grades will be calculated by dividing the total points earned by the total points possible and multiplying the value by 100.

    Grading Scale:

    97-100 A+ 94-96 A 90-93 A-

    87-89 B+ 84-86 B 80-83 B-

    77-79 C+ 74-76 C 70-73 C-

    67-69 D+ 64-66 D 60-63 D-

    60 or below F

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    1. Three Auto-ethnography Mini Reflections (2-3 pages double-spaced)

    As graduate students inquire into our own identity and experiences, especially in regard to concepts connected to critical pedagogy, students will engage in critical reflection. Students will complete 4 reflection essays that will serve as the basis for an auto-ethnography. Many of the writing will take place in class, with final touches being placed on the reflection for the due date. This writing should include critical reflection—not just description but a deeper level of reflection that includes questioning the ways things are/were.

    2. Theory to Practice Essay (4-5 pages double-spaced)

    The purpose of this essay is for graduate students to examine a concept they have encountered in reading or in class discussion. Students will: (a) introduce the concept by explaining what it means, where it comes from, and why it’s important, (b) apply the concept to a specific educational context which you are familiar by discussing such things as how it helps explain or critique a situation, or how when applied it might alter the situation, and (c) draw conclusions about the contributions the concept could make to educational practice.

    3. Philosopher/Theorist Essay (4-5 pages double-spaced)

    The purpose of this essay is to examine the contributions of a particular philosopher and/or theorist to critical theory/critical pedagogy. Specifically, students should (a) provide a brief biography of the person, (b) outline the person’s key contributions, including a definition of unfamiliar concepts, (c) explain connections between the person’s work and the work of others, and (d) clarify the connections between the person’s work and critical theory/critical pedagogy. Choose from any of the people whose work from class readings or from others whom students would like to become familiar.

    5. Auto-ethnography Presentation

    Graduate students will look across all journal entries and critical incidents from course—create a visual representation, digital story, poem, performance, etc. to represent what you have learned about yourself this semester. There should be connections to some of the key concepts we have discussed. The areas to be addressed should include-key aspects of identity, the influence of identity on values and beliefs in general and with regard to education/teacher education, areas of growth this semester, and areas for future growth. Excerpts from reflections and journal should serve as data to develop this auto-ethnography presentation.

    6. Facilitated Discussion

    This semester each graduate student will gain experience facilitating and participating in difficult and courageous conversations about topics that may seem uncomfortable. Once during the semester each graduate student will lead a discussion connected to a particular reading(s) that is due that day. Your role as facilitator will include developing questions to guide the discussion. You will also work to extend our learning beyond the reading by developing an activity, making connections to current issues, using media, etc.

    7. Specialization Essay (4-5 pages double-spaced)

    The purpose of this essay is to identify and discuss themes in a set of at least 5 readings that focus on a topic of interest within the domain of critical pedagogy and teacher education. After reading at least 5 articles/chapters related to the topic, you are to (a) introduce the topic and your interest in it, (b) discuss key ideas/themes synthesized from across the readings (do not discuss one reading after another), and (c) relate what you have learned to what we’ve been reading and discussing in class (i.e. how does what you’ve read extend, reinforce, differ from, contradict what we’ve been doing together).

    8. Specialization Praxis Project: In connection to the topic of the specialization essay, each student will work on a project that puts the concepts, theories, etc. from this research into practice. This action should be meaningful to each graduate student’s research, teaching, or service and be a basis for research. Praxis projects could include: a proposal for a research study about your area of interest, redesigning a syllabus for a class you will teach that includes some of the concepts from this semester—with the inclusion of several assignments, readings, activities you will use as a part of this class, redesigning an observation tool/process for supervision, designing a professional development module for—collaborating teachers, fellow doctoral students, co-workers, etc., engaging in an equity audit of your current school context and plans for goals based on this data, etc.

    9. Informed class participation

    This includes: being prepared for class, referring to specific ideas from the readings, linking concepts across readings and class sessions, participating in class activities, listening for understanding, commenting respectfully on others’ ideas, presenting one’s work to the class, being open-minded).

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Attendance and participation at every class meeting is indicative of your engagement, involvement and professionalism. Informed class participation includes being prepared for class, referring to specific ideas from the readings, linking concepts across readings and class sessions, participating in class activities, listening for understanding, commenting respectfully on others’ ideas, presenting one’s work to the class, being open-minded).

    If you will be absent, you are responsible for notifying the instructor prior to class by email or phone. It is the student’s responsibility to get any missed notes, information, and handouts.

    Any assignment that is not turned in at the designated time is considered late. Assignments submitted within 7 days after the due date will receive no more than half credit. Any assignment that is turned in after 7 days will not be accepted and will receive no credit unless a prior discussion has taken place with the professor.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Curriculum and Instruction with a Specialization in Teacher Education and Learning


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.