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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - RED6068

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2016-08-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: Required for MA in Reading Ed. To GC 5/10/16. Approved 5/12/16 To USF Sys 5/18/16; to SCNS after 5/25/16. Nmbr 6061 approved as 6068 eff 8/1/16


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    5129 2014-10-28
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Teaching and Learning (T&L) ED 0-1714-000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Danielle Dennis 8139743460 dennis@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    RED 6068 Adolescent Literacy: In and Out of School Literacy Practices

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Adol Lit Prac
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    O - Online (100% online) 100

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    Explore the literate practices (both in and out of school) of adolescent learners, including the ways that race, gender, and culture inform and impact students’ agency a identity.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed to compete with national trends

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Each year, the International Reading Association publishes a "What's Hot" section in their Reading Today publication. Adolescent Literacy has been one of the top five items on that list for several years. Given this and that our program leads to K-12 certification, but is currently focused largely on K-5, it is essential that we have a course focused on the unique instructional needs of adolescents.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Ph.D. is required to teach this course. Faculty with expertise in adolescent literacy are preferred.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Develop understanding of adolescents in and out of school literacy practices. (FEAP 1a, 5b; FLCS 11, 12; IRA 4, 5)

    2. Critically analyze literature related to adolescents’ in and out of school literacy practices. (FEAP 1f, 2e, 3a, 3c, 5e, 5f; FLCS 11, 12; IRA 1, 4, 5)

    3. Develop instructional implications for adolescents based on the critical analysis of literature. (FEAP 1f, 2e, 3a, 3c, 5e, 5f; FLCS 11, 12; IRA 1, 4, 5)

    4. Share knowledge of the literature with colleagues. (FEAP 5a, 5e, 5f; FLCS 11, 12; IRA 1, 4, 5)

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to:

    1. Develop understanding of adolescents in and out of school literacy practices. (FEAP 1a, 5b; FLCS 11, 12; IRA 4, 5)

    2. Critically analyze literature related to adolescents’ in and out of school literacy practices. (FEAP 1f, 2e, 3a, 3c, 5e, 5f; FLCS 11, 12; IRA 1, 4, 5)

    3. Develop instructional implications for adolescents based on the critical analysis of literature. (FEAP 1f, 2e, 3a, 3c, 5e, 5f; FLCS 11, 12; IRA 1, 4, 5)

    4. Share knowledge of the literature with colleagues. (FEAP 5a, 5e, 5f; FLCS 11, 12; IRA 1, 4, 5)

    C. Major Topics

    1. Understanding Youth’s Everyday Literacies

    a. Re/constructing adolescents’ identities.

    b. Texts and the performance of identity.

    c. What does it mean to be a “struggling” adolescent?

    d. Culturally responsive discussions about text.

    2. Integrating Everyday and Academic Literacies

    a. Identity through science and mathematics classroom discourse communities.

    b. Adolescents’ cultural capital in teaching and learning.

    c. Adolescent agency and literacy.

    d. Intersection of In-School and Out-of-School literacy practices.

    3. Addressing Sociocultural and Identity Issues in Adolescents’ Literacy Lives

    a. Language, identity, and social class.

    b. Race, language, and culture in critical literacy.

    c. New literacies and adolescent readers.

    d. Representations of literacy by and for adolescents.

    4. Changing Teachers, Teaching Changes

    a. Developing reading and writing strategies for multiple contexts.

    b. Negotiating text: Strategy instruction and use with adolescents.

    c. Multimodality and literacy learning.

    d. Assessment across contexts.

    D. Textbooks

    Alvermann, D. E., & Hinchman, K. A. (Eds.) (2012). Reconceptualizing the Literacies in Adolescents’ Lives, Third Edition. Mahway, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

    Hinchman, K. A., & Sheridan-Thomas, H. K. (Eds.). (2014). Best Practices in Adolescent Literacy Instruction, Second Edition. New York: Guilford Press.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Students will also read current articles from journals such as Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, Journal of STEM Education, etc.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Article Critiques (25%) N=10

    Guidelines and a rubric will be provided in class.

    Research Proposal (25%)

    You will develop a research proposal related to a topic discussed in this course. You will prepare a research paper that explains, compares, and contrasts major theories/research related to your topic. For this assignment, you will include a research proposal that provides an overview of your project and a literature review. Guidelines and a rubric will be provided in class.

    Research Paper (25%)

    For this assignment, you will critically analyze no less than 15 research articles on the topic presented in your research proposal. You will include a description of the methods used in each article, as well as an overview of the findings, and a discussion of the limitations. Based on this analysis, you will present recommendations for teaching adolescents. Guidelines and a rubric will be provided in class.

    Research Presentation (25%)

    Using the results from your research paper, you will create a presentation that you post and share with your colleagues in the course. Working in small groups, you will watch each member’s presentation and engage in dialogue related to each topic. Guidelines and a rubric will be provided in class.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Article Critiques (25%)

    Guidelines and a rubric will be provided in class.

    Research Proposal (25%)

    You will develop a research proposal related to a topic discussed in this course. You will prepare a research paper that explains, compares, and contrasts major theories/research related to your topic. For this assignment, you will include a research proposal that provides an overview of your project and a literature review. Guidelines and a rubric will be provided in class.

    Research Paper (25%)

    For this assignment, you will critically analyze no less than 15 research articles on the topic presented in your research proposal. You will include a description of the methods used in each article, as well as an overview of the findings, and a discussion of the limitations. Based on this analysis, you will present recommendations for teaching adolescents. Guidelines and a rubric will be provided in class.

    Research Presentation (25%)

    Using the results from your research paper, you will create a presentation that you post and share with your colleagues in the course. Working in small groups, you will watch each member’s presentation and engage in dialogue related to each topic. Guidelines and a rubric will be provided in class.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    Attendance is mandatory in synchronous sessions. Promptness is expected. Active participation and preparation for class is essential. Assignments must be turned in on time.

    There are many legitimate reasons for absences, tardies, and late work (e.g., family emergencies, illness, car trouble, professional obligations, children’s recitals, etc.). If you miss class, arrive late, or exit early, I know that your reasons are legitimate. Therefore, I do not “excuse” absences or tardies. However, consistent and complete attendance is necessary to engage in the participatory culture of this class. Subsequently, excessive absences (more than 1) or tardies (more than 2) will lower your course grade by one letter grade. Any tardy over 30 minutes is considered an absence.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    A student who will miss an assignment due date because of an excused absence (arranged with the instructor ahead of time) will be given one week to submit the assignment without penalty. If the student misses this deadline, the assignment will become "unexcused" and follow the procedure noted below.

    Each unexcused late assignment will lower your grade on the assignment by a letter grade for each calendar day that it is late. If you must turn in an unexcused late assignment, I will not accept it more than one week past its original due date.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Master of the Arts in Reading


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    English Education; Secondary Education



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