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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - PHC6251

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2015-04-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: Change
Course Change Information (for course changes only): Remove all pre-requisites including consent of instructor
Comments: For MPH - PH: Infection Control - required. Repeatable. Appd 2/13/15. To USF Sys 2/27/15. Apprd eff 4/1/15


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    5118 2014-10-21
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Global Health PH 640800
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Donna Haiduven 8139746472 dhaiduve@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    PHC 6251 Disease Surveillance and Monitoring

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times?

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Disease Surveill. And Monitor.
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    O - Online (100% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Basic Epidemiology, Biostatistics or Consent of Instructor

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    A review of epidemiological principles and methods used in the development and practice of disease and infection surveillance, prevention and control for public health in general and the healthcare setting in particular. Basic epidemiological concepts wil


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Existing Course - only removing Pre-reqs

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Existing Course - only removing Pre-reqs

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Existing Course - only removing Pre-reqs

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Terminal Degree


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Outline the historical development of public health surveillance and disease reporting.

    2. List and describe the role of surveillance in public health; uses of surveillance; essential elements of a surveillance system; types of and sources of surveillance, citing disease examples for each.

    3. Differentiate between the functional, intermediate, and central levels of surveillance citing several tasks for each level.

    4. Define and describe the 4 categories of healthcare-associated infection (HAI) surveillance and three additional types of surveillance conducted in healthcare settings.

    5. List and describe the steps to take in investigating a disease outbreak in both the hospital and community settings. Participate in an outbreak investigation exercise to apply these principles.

    6. Summarize, interpret and formulate recommendations for communicable disease surveillance in public

    health practice based on an assessment of existing surveillance data.

    7. Synthesize and evaluate HIV/AIDS surveillance information from a variety of sources including Internet sites, published literature, institutional reports, unpublished studies and expert opinion.

    8. Participate in the collection, summary and analysis of surveillance data.

    9. Define infectious and non-infectious hazards present in healthcare facilities for which surveillance may be indicated.

    10. List and describe at least 3 forms of international surveillance.

    11. Summarize important concepts for the following types of surveillance: healthcare facility; occupational health, HIV/AIDS, bloodborne pathogens & needlestick injuries in healthcare workers; vaccine-preventable disease; international; foodborne outbreak; and surveillance during construction & renovation of healthcare facilities.

    12. Apply principles from the course in a comprehensive final exam.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. Outline the historical development of public health surveillance and disease reporting.

    2. List and describe the role of surveillance in public health; uses of surveillance; essential elements of a surveillance system; types of and sources of surveillance, citing disease examples for each.

    3. Differentiate between the functional, intermediate, and central levels of surveillance citing several tasks for each level.

    4. Define and describe the 4 categories of healthcare-associated infection (HAI) surveillance and three additional types of surveillance conducted in healthcare settings.

    5. List and describe the steps to take in investigating a disease outbreak in both the hospital and community settings. Participate in an outbreak investigation exercise to apply these principles.

    6. Summarize, interpret and formulate recommendations for communicable disease surveillance in public

    health practice based on an assessment of existing surveillance data.

    7. Synthesize and evaluate HIV/AIDS surveillance information from a variety of sources including Internet sites, published literature, institutional reports, unpublished studies and expert opinion.

    8. Participate in the collection, summary and analysis of surveillance data.

    9. Define infectious and non-infectious hazards present in healthcare facilities for which surveillance may be indicated.

    10. List and describe at least 3 forms of international surveillance.

    C. Major Topics

    1. Core Surveillance Concepts

    2. National Surveillance Systems & Disease Reporting

    3. Healthcare Associated Infections (HAI) & Healthcare Surveillance

    4. Outbreak Investigation

    5. Data Collection and Interpretation

    6. Data Analysis

    7. Surveillance for HIV/AIDS

    8. Bloodborne Pathogen & Needlestick Injury Surveillance

    9. Surveillance for Healthcare Workers

    10. International Surveillance

    11. Surveillance for Foodborne Illness & Holiday Food Safety

    12. Vaccine Preventable Disease Surveillance

    13. Surveillance during Construction & Renovation

    D. Textbooks

    There is no REQUIRED text for this course. Prior to this semester, the book that had previously served as the text for this course was Public Health Surveillance by William Halperin and Edward Baker Junior, 1992, John Wiley & Sons. Unfortunately this book has gone out of print since 2004. Lecture notes from Dr. Haiduven or guest lecturers will be provided via CANVAS. Any required and supplemental readings will be posted on CANVAS, or students will be given links to obtain these readings.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Students in all online public health courses are expected to meet the basic technology requirements to successfully participate in their courses. Failure to meet these requirements may cause problems accessing the course materials.

    It is the student's responsibility to ensure all requirements are met prior to the start of the semester.

    http://health.usf.edu/publichealth/eta/students_tech_requirements.htm

    Special Technology Requirements for this course: None in addition to above

    Pre-requisite technology skills: N/A for this course

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Straight letter grades are given as follows:

    Grading Scale: A= (90-100), B= (80-89.9), C= (70-79.9); D= (60-69.9); F =

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    1. ASSIGNMENTS: There are 7 assignments throughout the course. Each assignment is worth 20 total points and 5% of the course grade. Together the assignments are worth 35% (140 points) of the course grade. The format of these assignments varies and complete instructions are provided on the course website for each assignment. Each assignment is due by 9 PM on the Sunday night of the week it is covered. See “Course Schedule” section in the syllabus for individual due dates. Any assignment submitted past the due date and time will have 5 points deducted from the grade for each hour that it is late. You are able to use specified resource materials for these assignments, just not consultation with any other persons.

    2. OUTBREAK EXERCISE: Students will be assigned an outbreak investigation exercise (no later than the third week of class) that can be completed online. This assignment is worth 10% of the course grade (100 points) and is due by 9 PM Sunday, September 28.

    3. EXAMINATIONS: The midterm examination will be administered online from 8 AM Thursday, October 16 until Friday, October 17 at 10 PM. The midterm exam will be open-book and consist of multiple choice, and matching questions. Students will be given 2 hours to complete this exam. The final examination will be administered online from 8 AM, Sunday, December 7 until Tuesday, December 9, at 10 PM. The final examination is cumulative and will be open-book consisting of a multiple-choice, matching and essay question format. Students will be given 4 hours and 55 minutes to complete this exam. There will be reviews for the midterm and final exams posted no later than two weeks prior to each exam.

    4. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH HAZARDS EXERCISE: Students will be given an exercise to familiarize them with occupational health hazards, focusing on biological exposures, in a healthcare setting. This assignment is worth 10% (50 points) and is due by 9 PM Sunday, November 2.

    5. EXTRA CREDIT: There are 2 ways to receive extra credit points in the course.

    1. Extra credit activities: There are 5 opportunities to receive extra credit points added to the Assignment points (that make up 35% of the course grade). The first opportunity is during week 4, the second during week 9, and the third during week 14. For each of these 3 opportunities, submission of the completed extra credit activity by the due date and time will result in up to 2 extra credit points. In addition, there is a 1-point opportunity to receive extra credit on Assignment #6, Part II. The fifth opportunity is that Assignment #3 has a 2-point extra credit question on it.

    2. Exams: There will be extra credit questions on the exams. It is possible to receive full, partial, or no points, depending upon your answers.

    Extra credit points possible: 6 on extra-credit activities added to specific assignments, 2 on Assignment #3, 1 on Assignment #6 Part II, 2 on midterm exam, and 5 on the final exam. Total possible extra credit points: 16

    Note: specific instructions for completing assignments or preparing for exams will be provided on the course website.

    FEEDBACK ON EXAMS AND ASSIGNMENTS: Students should expect to receive feedback on the assignments, exercises, extra credit activities, and exams no later than 2 weeks after the due date (unless the instructor is out of town). For the final exam, students will receive feedback before final grades are posted. Feedback cannot be made available until: 1) all students have completed the assignment or exam, 2) a detailed analysis of the results has been conducted, and 3) a two-day advance notice of the feedback posting is announced. Thus, it is not possible to post the feedback dates and times in advance.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MPH - EPIDEMIOLOGY AND GLOBAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASES


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    MPH - GLOBAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

    MPH - Infection Control

    MSPH - GLOBAL COMMUNICABLE DISEASE



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.