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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - LAE6315

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2016-08-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: Change
Course Change Information (for course changes only): Change title to: Composing Texts: Disciplinary Practices for Writers & Writing Change description to: Examine writing as a multimodal, communicative practice embedded in social, cultural, and disciplinary contexts. Demonstrate strategies to facilitate K-12 students’ writing development as well as develop leadership skills to support writing teachers. Change objectives to a) Demonstrate an understanding of writing as a communicative practice involving multi-symbolic systems such as text transcription, phonetic coding, visual expression, oral language, etc. • (CF 2, 6; IRA/RSLC 1.1; ACEI 1.0, 2.1; CS 1.1; FRC 1B3, 1C4, 1E4, 2B4, 2C4) b) Interpret writing theory and research to understand the needs of writers with diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. • (CF 5; IRA/RSLC 1.1, 2.1; ACEI3.3) c) Demonstrate a critical stance toward the scholarship, policies, and practices of writing and multi-media composing research. • (CF 4; IRA/RSLC 1.1, 2.1) d) Create supportive social environments that promote writing for discipline-specific purposes. • (CF 2; IRA/RSLC 5.2) e) Collaborate with and provide support for teachers in their analysis of students’ writing processes and products, using observations and assessment results to vary instruction to meet students’ needs. • (CF 1; IRA/RSLC 3.2; FRC 2G1) f) Use a wide range of texts (e.g., narrative, expository, and poetry) from traditional print, digital, and online resources to provide differentiated instruction, to capitalize on diversity, and to promote writing competency. • (CF 3; IRA/RSLC; ACEI 3.1; CS 6.1, 12.3; FRC 1G4) g) Use evidence-based grouping practices to meet the needs of all students, especially those who struggle with writing. • (FEAPS 3h; CF 6; IRA/RSLC 5.4) h) Demonstrate effective use of technology for improving student learning. • (FEAPS 4f; CF 3; IRA/RSLC 6.2) i) Participate in, design, facilitate, lead, and evaluate effective and differentiated professional development programs to support writing and multi-media composing. • (IRA/RSLC 6.3; ACEI 3.5, 5.1; CS 13.2) j) Provide students with linguistic, academic, and cultural experiences that link school to their communities. • (FEAPS 5d; CF 5; IRA/RSLC 4.3; ACEI 3.2, 5.2; CS 13.1) Add Learning outcomes: A. The Writer (Observation & Instruction) (15%) Students develop idiosyncratic strategies for creating text. Some students draw before they write, some talk while they write, some write in silence, or some may prefer to play and dramatize as they write. In order to fully understand student writers, teachers must carefully observe students in the act of creating text. Therefore, you will conduct focused observations of one student writer. You will focus on a particular area of writing to guide your observations (e.g., idea development, role of talk, forms of writing, vocabulary, etc.). Then you will observe the student in the act of creating text (free writing, assigned writing, informal writing, etc.) to gain insight into his or her process. You must watch the student in the act of writing and not simply collect writing samples. You should collect the following types of information: writing samples, audio recordings of social interactions during writing (Smart pen), direct observations, field notes, interview notes, interviews. As you collect the information, look for patterns of behavior and/or patterns across texts and consider your observations in light of writing theory and research. What did you notice about the student as a writer? B. Writing Research Review (10%) You will read and review at least 12 recent research articles (published within the last 5-7 years) on a topic of your choice that inform your observations of a student writer. You will identify the articles and then complete a summary table in which you identify the following: 1) Citation information 2) Summary of the article (Who was involved? What did the researchers do? What did the researchers find?) 3) Critique of the problem, methods, and/or findings (What were the problems in this research design or execution?) You will synthesize the information across the studies. You will write the synthesis in stages (What did you learn about writing from all three articles?) Research Review #1- Read 4 articles (5%) Research Review #2- Read 4 articles (5%) Research Review #3- Read 4 articles (5%) C. The Writer: Research Project Final Report (20%) (Critical Task*) Using information from your observations of a writer and your synthesis of research on a topic of relevance to the student, you will write a final report to include: 1) a review of research relevant to your student, 2) explicit discussion of the details of your observations (i.e., what you did, where you were, etc.) 3) introduction to the student and the classroom context, 4) interpretations of the data and examples of the data you created, 4) implications for teaching and further research. D. Coaching Writing Teachers (15%) (Critical Task*) You will develop and execute a writing module for writing coaches. As a class, we will identify common issues in classrooms that require the support of the writing coach. I will assign topics and you will create a multi-media demonstration lesson or workshop that supports other teachers’ professional development. Your classmates will provide feedback on your presentation effectiveness/usefulness. I will evaluate the content of your lesson and the effectiveness of your presentation. E. Modules (30%) Weekly modules will include topical discussion boards and other assignments to reflect course readings. F. Comprehensive Final Exam (10%) The final cannot be “made up” unless there is a documented emergency and the instructor is informed prior to the final. In addition, the “late assignment” policy will apply. Add topics: 1. Composing as a Symbolic Process a. Symbolic representation systems (e.g. writing, drawing, talking, play, art, performance, media creation) b. Process Theories and Research c. Product Theories and Research d. Developing a Theory of Practice 2. The Writer a. Writing Development of Young Children b. Writing Development across the Elementary Grades c. Writing Development of Adolescents d. Writing Development of Adult Learners (Personal & Workplace Literacies) 3. The Writing Teacher a. Teacher as Writer b. Teacher Knowledge of Writing c. Instructional Strategies d. Effective Writing Programs 4. Writing Environment a. Writing Spaces b. Writing Tools (media resources, materials, instruments) c. Technology as a Tool, Technology as Literacy d. Participatory Culture and Purpose 5. Text Types and Purposes a. Genres and Text Structure b. Traits c. Discipline-Specific Texts d. The Arts and Writing e. Spelling, Grammar, and Presentation (handwriting, white space, page design) 6. Writing Assessment a. Local, State, and National Standards b. Data-based Decision Making 7. Coaching Writing a. Coaching Other Teachers b. Coaching Parents c. Coaching in the Community Ad Textbook info: Schneider, J.J. (2014). Casework in K-6 Writing Instruction: Connecting Composing Strategies, Digital Literacies, and Disciplinary Content to the Common Core. New York, NY: Peter Lang. Graham, S., MacArthur, C. A., & Fitzgerald, J. (Eds.). (2013). Best practices in writing instruction. Guilford Press.
Comments: Required for MA in Reading Ed. Form completed incorrectly with changed info in fields. OGS fixed. To GC. Obj and LO need rev. . Emailed 5/12/16. Updated. Need topics 5/18/16. Approved 5/20/16 To Sys 5/20/16. To SCNS after 5/27/16. Apprvd eff 8/1/16


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    5095 2014-10-14
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Teaching and Learning (T&L) ED 0-1714-000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Jenifer Schneider 8139741057 jschneid@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    LAE 6315 Writing and Writers: Trends and Issues

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 O - Other R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Writing and Writers: Trends
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    O - Online (100% online) 100

    Prerequisites

    none

    Corequisites

    none

    Course Description

    EXAMINE WRITING AS A DEVELOPING SYMBOL SYSTEM THAT IS EMBEDDED IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXTS. STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES TO FACILITATE CHILDREN'S WRITING DEVELOPMENT, AS WELL AS DEVELOP INDIVIDUAL STRATEGIES FOR COMPOSING TEXTS.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed to compete with national trends

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    The course is offered twice a year for students in the Masters in Reading Program. Current offerings meet College enrollment targets.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Terminal Degree and 18 graduate credit hours in literacy studies

    Current research publications about writing and writing instruction


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    a) Understand writing as a communicative practice involving multi-symbolic systems such as text transcription, phonetic coding, visual expression, oral language.

    · (CF 2, 6; ILA/RSLC 1.1; ACEI 1.0, 2.1; CS 1.1; FRC 1B3, 1C4, 1E4, 2B4, 2C4)

    b) Understand writing theory and research related to the needs of writers with diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds.

    · (CF 5; ILA/RSLC 1.1, 2.1; ACEI3.3)

    c) Demonstrate a critical analysis of scholarship on policies and practices of writing and multi-media composing research.

    · (CF 4; ILA/RSLC 1.1, 2.1)

    d) Create supportive social environments for writing for discipline-specific purposes.

    · (CF 2; ILA/RSLC 5.2)

    e) Demonstrate ability to observe and assess students’ writing processes and products in order to meet the needs of diverse students.

    · (CF 1; ILA/RSLC 3.2; FRC 2G1)

    f) Deploy text selection a wide range of contexts (e.g., narrative, expository, and poetry) from traditional print, digital, and online resources to provide differentiated instruction, to capitalize on diversity, and to promote writing competency.

    · (CF 3; ILA/RSLC; ACEI 3.1; CS 6.1, 12.3; FRC 1G4)

    g) Understand grouping practices to meet the needs of all students, especially those who struggle with writing.

    · (FEAPS 3h; CF 6; ILA/RSLC 5.4)

    h) Demonstrate effective use of technology for improving student learning.

    · (FEAPS 4f; CF 3; ILA/RSLC 6.2)

    i) Evaluate effective and differentiated professional development programs to support writing and multi-media composing.

    · (ILA/RSLC 6.3; ACEI 3.5, 5.1; CS 13.2)

    j) Provide students with linguistic, academic, and cultural experiences that link school to their communities.

    · (FEAPS 5d; CF 5; ILA/RSLC 4.3; ACEI 3.2, 5.2; CS 13.1)

    B. Learning Outcomes

    a) Students will use writing as a communicative practice in weekly modules

    · (CF 2, 6; ILA/RSLC 1.1; ACEI 1.0, 2.1; CS 1.1; FRC 1B3, 1C4, 1E4, 2B4, 2C4)

    b) Students will deploy writing theory and research in Research Projects.

    · (CF 5; ILA/RSLC 1.1, 2.1; ACEI3.3)

    c) Students will write with a critical stance in the Writing Research Review.

    · (CF 4; ILA/RSLC 1.1, 2.1)

    d) Students will create supportive social environments that promote writing for discipline-specific purposes in The Writer assignment.

    · (CF 2; ILA/RSLC 5.2)

    e) Students will collaborate with and provide support for teachers in their analyses of students’ writing processes and products in the Coaching Writing Project.

    · (CF 1; ILA/RSLC 3.2; FRC 2G1)

    f) Students will use a range of texts to provide differentiated instruction, to capitalize on diversity, and to promote writing competency in the Research Project.

    · (CF 3; ILA/RSLC; ACEI 3.1; CS 6.1, 12.3; FRC 1G4)

    g) Students will use evidence-based grouping practices to meet the needs of all students, especially those who struggle with writing in the Coaching Writers Project.

    · (FEAPS 3h; CF 6; ILA/RSLC 5.4)

    h) Students will demonstrate effective use of technology for improving student learning in writing for STEM areas in the Weekly Modules.

    · (FEAPS 4f; CF 3; ILA/RSLC 6.2)

    i) Students will design professional development programs to support writing and multi-media composing in STEM area subjects in the Coaching Writing Project.

    · (ILA/RSLC 6.3; ACEI 3.5, 5.1; CS 13.2)

    j) Students will connect schools to their communities within STEM areas in the Modules.

    · (FEAPS 5d; CF 5; ILA/RSLC 4.3; ACEI 3.2, 5.2; CS 13.1)

    C. Major Topics

    Writing Development

    Writing Strategies

    Writing Instruction

    Writing Assessment

    Multimodal Composition

    Disciplinary Composition

    D. Textbooks

    Schneider, J.J. (2014). Casework in K-6 Writing Instruction: Connecting Composing Strategies, Digital Literacies, and Disciplinary Content to the Common Core. New York, NY: Peter Lang. Graham, S., MacArthur, C. A., & Fitzgerald, J. (Eds.). (2013). Best practices in writing instruction. Guilford Press.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Clay, M. (1975). What did I write? Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (seminal text for early writing development)

    Graham, S., & Perin, D. (2007). Writing next: Effective strategies to improve writing of adolescents in middle and high schools. A report to Carnegie Corporation of New York. Alliance for Excellent Education.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    A. The Writer (Objectives a, b; CF 2, 5, 6; IRA/RSLC 1.1, 1.2; ACEI 1.0, 2.1, 3.3; CS 1.1, ; FRC 1B3, 1C4, 1E4, 2B4, 2C4)

    B. Writing Research Review (Critical Task*) (Objectives a, b, c; CF 2, 4, 5, 6; IRA/RSLC 1.1, 1.2, 2.1; ACEI 1.0, 2.1, 3.3; CS 1.1; FRC 1B3, 1C4, 1E4, 2B4, 2C4)

    C. Research Project Final Report (Critical Task*) (Objectives a, b, c; CF 2, 4, 5, 6; IRA/RSLC 1.1, 1.2, 2.1; ACEI 1.0, 2.1, 3.3; CS 1.1; FRC 1B3, 1C4, 1E4, 2B4, 2C4)

    D. Coaching Writing Teachers* (Objectives a, e, i, j; CF 1, 2, 6; IRA/RSLC 1.1, 3.2; ACEI 1.0, 2.1; CS 1.1, ; FRC 1B3, 1C4, 1E4, 2B4, 2C4, 2G1)

    E. Modules (Objectives d, f, g, h; (FEAPS 3h, 4f; CF 2, 3, 6; IRA/RSLC 5.2, 5.4, 6.2; ACEI 3.1; CS 6.1, 12.3; FRC 1G4)

    F. Final Exam

    Grading Criteria:

    A 100-98 A+ 97-95 A 94-92 A-

    B 91-90 B+ 89-85 B 84-82 B-

    C 81-80 C+ 79-75 C 74-72 C-

    D/F 71-62= D 61 and Below = F

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    A. The Writer (Observation & Instruction) (15%)

    Students develop idiosyncratic strategies for creating text. Some students draw before they write, some talk while they write, some write in silence, or some may prefer to play and dramatize as they write. In order to fully understand student writers, teachers must carefully observe students in the act of creating text. Therefore, you will conduct focused observations of one student writer. You will focus on a particular area of writing to guide your observations (e.g., idea development, role of talk, forms of writing, vocabulary, etc.). Then you will observe the student in the act of creating text (free writing, assigned writing, informal writing, etc.) to gain insight into his or her process. You must watch the student in the act of writing and not simply collect writing samples. You should collect the following types of information: writing samples, audio recordings of social interactions during writing (Smart pen), direct observations, field notes, interview notes, interviews. As you collect the information, look for patterns of behavior and/or patterns across texts and consider your observations in light of writing theory and research. What did you notice about the student as a writer?

    B. Writing Research Review (10%)

    You will read and review at least 12 recent research articles (published within the last 5-7 years) on a topic of your choice that inform your observations of a student writer. You will identify the articles and then complete a summary table in which you identify the following:

    1) Citation information

    2) Summary of the article (Who was involved? What did the researchers do? What did the researchers find?)

    3) Critique of the problem, methods, and/or findings (What were the problems in this research design or execution?)

    You will synthesize the information across the studies. You will write the synthesis in stages (What did you learn about writing from all three articles?)

    Research Review #1- Read 4 articles (5%)

    Research Review #2- Read 4 articles (5%)

    Research Review #3- Read 4 articles (5%)

    C. Research Project Final Report (20%) (Critical Task*)

    Using information from your observations of a writer and your synthesis of research on a topic of relevance to the student, you will write a final report to include: 1) a review of research relevant to your student, 2) explicit discussion of the details of your observations (i.e., what you did, where you were, etc.) 3) introduction to the student and the classroom context, 4) interpretations of the data and examples of the data you created, 4) implications for teaching and further research.

    D. Coaching Writing Teachers (15%) (Critical Task*)

    You will develop and execute a writing module for writing coaches. As a class, we will identify common issues in classrooms that require the support of the writing coach. I will assign topics and you will create a multi-media demonstration lesson or workshop that supports other teachers’ professional development. Your classmates will provide feedback on your presentation effectiveness/usefulness. I will evaluate the content of your lesson and the effectiveness of your presentation.

    E. Modules (30%)

    Weekly modules will include topical discussion boards and other assignments to reflect course readings.

    F. Comprehensive Final Exam (10%)

    The final cannot be “made up” unless there is a documented emergency and the instructor is informed prior to the final. In addition, the “late assignment” policy will apply.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Attendance is mandatory in synchronous sessions. Promptness is expected. Active participation and preparation for class is essential. Assignments must be turned in on time.

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Late work will be reduced by one letter grade for each day late. Late work will not be accepted more than one week past the due date.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Masters in Reading


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    any Masters program in Secondary Education



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.