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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EDG7069

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2015-04-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: for EdD In Ed Prog Dev C&I - Required. GC Appd. (7046 already exists). Updated to 7069. To USF Sys 2/27/15. Approved effective 4/1/15


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    5077 2014-10-01
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Secondary Education ED 1714
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Howard Johnston 8132402620 johnston@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EDG 7069 Sustainable Innovation in Education

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Sustainable Innovation in Educ
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    B - Face-to-face and online (separate sections) 60

    Prerequisites

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    Research and theory on sustainable innovation, including life-cycles and evolution. Includes development of case study of existing or defunct innovation's origins, development, effectiveness and current status. Open to doctoral students in COEDU.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course will serve as a core requirement in the Ed.D. in program development for cohort programs in Tampa and surrounding regions. The initial cohort program will be offered in Pinellas County.

    The EdD in Program Development is being updated to meet the principles and standards of the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Doctorate plus experience in innovative educational programming in schools or other institutional settings.

    Competence in managing online and distance learning courses.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The purpose of this course is for doctoral students to conduct a systematic examination and analysis of the theoretical and research literature on educational innovations with a particular emphasis on those that are sustained over time and successfully scaled up across multiple settings.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    At the conclusion of this course, students will:

    1. Prepare a detailed case study of an innovation in an educational institution with which they are familiar, identifying specifically:

    a. Institutional conditions that contribute to the success or failure of the innovation

    b. The political, social, economic and pedagogical motivations for the innovation

    c. Ancillary conditions and issues that affect the success or failure of the innovation (e.g., technological, personnel, etc.)

    2. Devise research-based criteria for assessing the sustainability potential of an educational innovation in the specific setting of the case study.

    3. Apply research based criteria in assessing the sustainability potential of the educational innovation described in the case study.

    4. Identify weaknesses and recommend modifications to the case study innovation that will contribute to its sustainability.

    C. Major Topics

    Foundations of Innovation: What is Innovation and What Drives Innovation in Education?

    Understanding “Disruptive Innovation”

    Human Factors in Innovation and Sustainability

    Individual Motivation and Performance in Innovations

    Organizational, Economic and Institutional Variables Associated with Sustainable Innovation

    Culture and Change

    Assessing Innovation and the Potential for Sustainability: Models and Techniques

    Sustainability “Lab”: Analyzing Specific Educational Innovations

    Designing Sustainable Innovations for Schools and Other Educational Settings

    D. Textbooks

    Christensen, C. M. and Horn, M.B. (2010). Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns. New York: McGraw-Hill.

    Christensen, C. (2004). Seeing What’s Next: Using Theories of Innovation to Predict Change. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Business Review Press. (Note: this is the foundation of the concept of “disruptive innovation,” the most current thinking about how innovation transforms institutions and promotes sustainability.)

    Fullen, M. (2010). The New Meaning of Educational Change, 4th Edition. New York: Teachers’ College Press.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Additional Readings and Resources

    Berman, P. and McLaughlin, M. (May, 1978). Federal Programs Supporting Educational Change, Volume III: Implementing and Sustaining Innovations. (Note: Despite its age, this is a seminal study of change and sustainability, indeed, one of the very first to examine the concept of sustainability in education. Much of the language of educational innovation and sustainability originated in this work.)

    Cachia, R., et. al., (2010). Creative Learning and Innovative Teaching: Final Report on the Study on Creativity and Innovation in Education in EU Member States. Brussels: Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Retrieved from: http://ideas.repec.org/p/ipt/iptwpa/jrc62370.html

    Cuban, L. (March 31, 2014). Moving Forward without a Backward Glance: MOOCs and Technological Innovations. Boulder, CO: National Educational Policy Center, University of Colorado. Retrieved from: http://nepc.colorado.edu/blog/moving-forward-without-backward-glance

    Deasy, J., Mundie, C., Palfrey, J., Fallonn J., Kirkpatrick, D. (2014). Learning for a New Era. Aspen Ideas Festival, 2014. Aspen, CO: The Aspen Institute.

    Heath, D. and Heath, C. (2007). Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die. New York: Random House. (Older than 5 years, but authors originated the concept of “stickiness” of innovation as a feature of sustainability.)

    Johnston, J.H. and Williamson, R. D. (2014). Sustaining innovation, part I: the foundations of sustainability. Research Into Practice Brief. Eugene, OR: Practical Leadership, for the Oregon University System, GEAR UP Program.

    Johnston, J. H. and Williamson, R. D. (2014). Sustaining innovation, part II and III: strategies and examples. Research Into Practice Brief. Eugene, OR: Practical Leadership, for the Oregon University System, GEAR UP Program.

    Johnston, J. H. and Williamson, R. D. (2014). The new normal: leading schools in an era of declining resources. New York: Routledge.

    Kahn, S. (2012). The One World Schoolhouse: Education Reimagined. New York: Twelve Publishing.

    Sarason, S. (1990). The Predictable Failure of Educational Reform. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. (Note: this classic book is one of the first, systematic investigations of educational innovation from a psycho-social perspective that establishes a theoretical framework that endures to the present.)

    Shelton, J. (September 28, 2011). “Educational Innovation: What It Is and Why We Need More of It.” Education Week Blogs. Retrieved from: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/sputnik/2011/09/education_innovation_what_it_is_and_why_we_need_more_of_it.html

    Sutch, D., Rudd, T. and Facer, K. (2008). Promoting Transformative Innovation in Schools. Bristol, UK: Futurelab.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Case study of educational innovation 50%

    Preparation of criteria for evaluating sustainability 20%

    Evaluation of case study innovation for sustainability 10%

    Recommendations for change to case study to assure

    sustainability 10%

    Presentation of case, case analysis, and recommendations 10%

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Weeks 1-3

    Foundations of Innovation: What is Innovation and What Drives Innovation in Education?

    Understanding “Disruptive Innovation”

    Weeks 4-6

    Human Factors in Innovation and Sustainability

    Individual Motivation and Performance

    Assignment: Draft Case Study Due

    Weeks 7-9

    Organizational, Economic and Institutional Variables Associated with Sustainable Innovation

    Culture and Change

    Weeks 10-11

    Assessing Innovation and the Potential for Sustainability: Models and Techniques

    Assignment: Criteria for Sustainability Due

    Assignment: Evaluation of Case Study Innovation for Sustainability

    Weeks 12-15

    Sustainability “Lab”: Analyzing Specific Educational Innovations

    Designing Sustainable Innovations for Schools and Other Educational Settings

    Assignment: Final Presentation of Case Study Analysis and Recommendations

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    All assignments must be completed on time. Students may make up missed assignments with a grade penalty. All work must be completed by the end of the semester in order to be presented in a class forum and critique session.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    EdD in Program Development


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    As an elective in all Ed.D. programs and the Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education.



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.