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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - GMS6004

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-11-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to Chair. Appd 5/19/14. to USF 5/20/14; to SCNS 5/28/14. Approved eff 11/1/14. Number 6003 apprd as 6004


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    4892 2014-01-24
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    MD USFF01HSC61440010000 0000000000000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Ingrid Bahner 8139743454 ibahner@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    GMS 6004 Introduction to Medical Sciences

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? Y
    Is this course repeatable? Y
    If repeatable, how many times? 1

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3-6 O - Other -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Intro Med Sci
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    This course is based on medical cases hat students explore in small groups that are faculty facilitated. Each case is concluded with a series of traditional didactic lectures relevant to the case. A learning specialist will provide learning strategies.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Replacing Selected Topics with Permanent number; already listed in program

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    10-20 students

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 3 or more times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Demonstrated expertise in medical education.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The overall objectives of this course are to introduce the students to the study of the medical sciences by both studying the subject matter as well as developing effective learning skills.

    The specific learning objectives are as follows:

    CASE 1

    Anatomy:

    1. Outline the common characteristics of synovial joints

    2. Describe the normal composition of the synovial fluid

    3. Explain the joints associated with the big toe

    4. Describe the metatarsophalangeal joint of the big toe and associated movements

    5. Trace the pathway from pain receptors of the thumb and big toe to the cerebral cortex

    Molecular Medicine:

    1. Understand the metabolic pathways used for purine metabolism in man, and how that pathway is controlled.

    2. Know the function of a key enzyme in the pathway that is a target for treatment.

    Physiology:

    1. Differentiate among the following terms: diffusion, facilitated diffusion, secondary active transport and primary active transport.

    2. Describe the concept of renal clearance.

    3. Describe the differences among renal excretion, secretion and reabsorption.

    4. Describe the renal handling of uric acid.

    Pathology:

    1. Describe the mechanism of cell injury by uric acids.

    2. How are monosodium urate crystals identified

    3. Why do so few with hyperuricemia develop gout?

    Medical Microbiology and Immunology:

    1. What are the cells of the immune system?

    2. What are the products of T cells, B cells, and macrophages?

    3. What are cytokines?

    4. What is inflammation?

    5. What is fever?

    6. What is the relationship of cytokines with inflammation and with fever?

    7. What is arthritis?

    Pharmacology:

    1. Identify the drugs that are used to treat an acute attack of gout, and briefly state their mechanism of action.

    2. Identify the drugs that can be used to prevent an attack of gout.

    Clinical Medicine:

    1. Develop a differential diagnosis for a red, swollen painful toe.

    2. Describe the four stages of “gout”.

    3. Identify precipitating factors for acute gout.

    4. Describe the most appropriate laboratory/radiological tests for diagnosis of gout.

    5. Identify appropriate treatments for acute gout and prophylaxis and when to start these treatments.

    CASE 2:

    Anatomy:

    1. Describe the developmental origin of the pancreas

    2. Outline the relationship of the pancreas

    3. Explain the arterial supply and venous drainage of the pancreas

    4. Define and identify the functional components (exo-and endocrine components) of the pancreas

    5. Describe the characteristics of the islets of Langerhans

    Molecular Medicine:

    1. Understand the molecular mechanisms by which elevated blood glucose stimulates the secretion of insulin by pancreatic beta cells

    2. Understand the general roles of glucagon and insulin in controlling blood glucose levels, as well as the molecular mechanisms by which they exert their effects.

    3. Understand how chronically elevated levels of blood sugars (glucose or galactose) can lead to cataracts.

    4. Know what ketone bodies are, how they are biosynthesized, and why they are usually elevated in poorly managed diabetics and during fasting.

    Physiology

    1. Describe the effects of insulin on transport of glucose, amino acids and potassium.

    2. List the glucose “counter-regulatory” hormones and briefly describe the mechanism(s) by which they raise glucose.

    3. Explain the concept of renal transport maximum tm and how it can result in polyuria

    Pathology:

    1. Compare and contrast type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in terms of pathogenesis, clinical observations and changes in the pancreas.

    2. Describe the complications of diabetes mellitus including those in the cardiovascular, renal, ocular and immune systems.

    3. List the most common causes of mortality in long-standing diabetes.

    Medical Microbiology and Immunology:

    1. Explain the concept of immunological tolerance

    2. Contrast central and peripheral tolerance

    3. Discuss how failure of self tolerance may lead to type I diabetes

    Pharmacology:

    1. Explain how hemoglobin A1C develops and why it is the serum marker for long term control of diabetes.

    2. Describe the use of different insulin preparations for a Type 1 diabetic, including the timing of administration.

    3. Describe the current recommended management of type 1 diabetes

    Clinical Medicine:

    1. Describe diabetic ketoacidosis.

    2. Describe precipitating factors for DKA.

    3. Develop a differential diagnosis for DKA.

    4. Identify appropriate laboratory tests for the diagnosis of DKA

    5. Identify appropriate treatments for DKA in the acute setting

    6. Explain the clinical use of the anion gap measurement

    CASE 3

    Anatomy

    1. Describe the developmental origin of the heart

    2. Outline the shunts associated with fetal circulation

    3. Explain the relationship of the heart and in particular the left atrium

    4. Describe role of the pulmonary vessels and aorta in the adult circulation

    5. Discern the layers of the heart and their characteristics

    6. Compare and contrast the characteristics of cardiac vs. skeletal muscles

    Physiology

    1. Explain the patient’s recent nocturnal and exertional dyspnea (“three pillows on my bed; “I can’t talk easily”.

    2. Give the possible physiological reasons for the following abnormal findings in the patient:

    a. irregular heart rate, atrial fibrillation and ventricular rhythm of 86:

    b. audible third heart sound:

    c. systolic murmur:

    d. elevated creatinine, decreased hemoglobin, decreased hematocrit

    e. Weight gain, pedal edema:

    f. Nocturia and reduced frequency of urination:

    g. Evaluate the patient’s lipid panel. Which values are abnormal? What disease/s are usually associated with these values?

    Pathology:

    1. Define the term “congestive heart failure”

    2. Explain the differences between forward and backward heart failure

    3. Describe the three primary mechanisms used by the heart to compensate for stresses caused by ischemia, nonischemic myocardial disease, hypertension, and valvular heart disease

    4. Describe the deleterious (negative) effects of myocardial hypertrophy

    5. List the common clinical symptoms and physical signs of right heart failure and left heart failure

    6. Describe the mechanism of formation of pulmonary edema.

    Medical Microbiology and Immunology:

    1. Explain how streptococcal infections may lead to rheumatic fever, specifically explain how autoreactive antibodies are generated and how they lead to damage of the heart.

    Pharmacology:

    1. List the available drugs for the treatment of congestive heart failure

    2. Explain the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors

    Clinical Medicine:

    1. Identify the differential diagnosis of Shortness of breath

    2. Describe the signs and symptoms of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)

    3. Understand the New York Heart Association classification of CHF

    4. Understand the difference between systolic and diastolic dysfunction

    5. Identify the most appropriate laboratory testing for CHF

    6. Identify the most appropriate treatment for CHF

    CASE 4

    Anatomy

    1. explain the development of the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles and lungs

    2. explain the significance of the bronchopulmonary segmentation

    3. discuss the relationships of the respiratory tract to the structures associated with the vascular and digestive systems

    4. discuss microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of the respiratory system

    5. define the roles of the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems in respiration

    Physiology

    1. Define the following primary lung volumes: Tidal volume(TV), Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV), Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV) and residual volume (RV).

    2. Discuss how the primary lung volumes combine to form the following Lung Capacities: Total Lung Capacity (TLC), Functional Residual Capacity (FRC), Inspiratory Capacity (IC) and Vital Capacity (VC).

    3. Differentiate Obstructive from Restrictive lung disease. Discuss the changes in lung volume and capacities associated with these. Define FEV, FEV1 and peak flow rates and how these are used in pulmonary function testing.

    Pathology

    1. Define asthma and describe the typical clinical features.

    2. Distinguish between the extrinsic and intrinsic types of asthma.

    3. List the important mediators involved in the pathogenesis of asthma.

    4. Describe the characteristic gross and microscopic features of asthma.

    Medical Microbiology and Immunology:

    1. Explain the functions of antibodies

    2. Explain the role of IgE and mast and eosinophil cells in asthma

    3. Explain the role of mast cell degranulation in asthma

    Pharmacology

    1. Discuss some of the therapies recommended in the treatment of asthma and their mechamisms:.

    2. Describe the mechanism of action of Beta adrenergic agonists and relate this to their use in the treatment of asthma.

    3. Discuss the role of glucocorticoids in the management of asthma

    Clinical Medicine:

    1. Identify factors used in assessing whether a patient’s asthma is controlled or not.

    2. Identify the appropriate treatments for asthma and which are used for mild and more severe disease.

    3. Understand how levels of evidence are used in developing practice guidelines

    CASE 5

    Anatomy

    1. Describe the anatomical relationships of the pancreas and duodenum

    2. Describe the blood supply to the pancreas

    3. Describe the histological organization of the pancreas

    Physiology

    1. Describe the mechanisms that normally prevent the duodenal contents from becoming excessively acidic.

    2. Describe the mechanism by which pancreatic zymogens are activated in the small intestine

    Pathology

    1. Identify the causes and describe the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

    2. Discuss the laboratory and other tests often used for diagnosing acute pancreatitis.

    3. Describe the macroscopic and microscopic findings in acute pancreatitis, and discuss the pathogenetic mechanisms of these findings

    Molecular Medicine

    1. Understand the genetics of pancreatitis and what specific enzymes are involved

    2. Understand the role of PST 1 in controlling autodigestion in the pancreas

    Medical Microbiology and Immunology

    1. Explain why some patients suffering from pancreatitis develop an infection

    2. Develop an understanding of bacteria and their role in the GI tract

    Pharmacology

    1. What types of drugs can be administered to alleviate abdominal pain?

    2. When should antibiotics be administered in the treatment of pancreatitis?

    3. What is the mechanism of action of antibiotics?

    4. How is the patient nourished?

    Clinical Medicine

    1. Understand the signs and symptoms of acute pancreatitis

    2. Understand the causes of acute pancreatitis

    3. Identify appropriate laboratory/imaging studies for acute pancreatitis

    4. Understand the treatment of acute pancreatitis

    5. Understand Ranson’s criteria for prognosis of acute pancreatitis

    6. Understand the complications of acute pancreatitis

    CASE 6

    Anatomy

    1. Discuss the development, gross and microanatomy of the thyroid gland.

    2. Contrast goiter, hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism

    Molecular Medicine

    1. Provide a definition of Graves’ Disease

    2. Explain the role of the thyroid gland in the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones

    3. Explain the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones

    4. Explain the role of Thyroid Stimulating Antibodies (TSAb) in the clinical manifestations of Graves’ disease

    Physiology

    1. Discuss the feedback control of the thyroid

    2. Explain the effects of hyper and hypo secretion of thyroid hormone and their clinical manifestations

    3. Explain how it is possible to have simultaneously a depressed TSH and an elevated T4

    Pathology

    1. Discuss the major causes and clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism and be familiar with the laboratory thyroid function tests utilized in the workup of this condition

    2. List the major gross and histologic changes associated with Graves disease.

    Microbiology and Immunology

    1. Explain the immune etiology of Graves’ Disease, specifically list the cells and molecules involved in the autoimmune mechanism

    2. Contrast this autoimmune mechanism to Diabetes, Rheumatic fever and Asthma

    Pharmacology/treatment

    1. What is the physiologic rational for the propranolol treatment? Why could it be discontinued after only 1 month?

    2. Why was the PTU effective at reliving her symptoms? Why didn’t it “cure” her

    3. Why does I131 treatment relieve her symptoms? What advantages does a I131 cocktail have over, for example, external radiation of the thyroid?

    4. What is the most probable diagnosis 2 years post I131? Suggest a treatment

    Clinical Medicine

    1. Identify the causes of hyperthyroidism

    2. Identify the signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism

    3. Identify the appropriate laboratory tests for hyperthyroidism

    4. Identify the appropriate treatments for hyperthyroidism

    B. Learning Outcomes

    At the conclusion of the course the students will have improved study skills in the medical sciences and developed a core knowledge in the medical sciences relevant to the cases.

    C. Major Topics

    Gout, T1DM, CHF, Asthma, Pancreatitis, Grave Disease

    D. Textbooks

    Abbas,A.K.; LichtmanA.H. and Pillai,S. 2014. Basic Immunology. 4th ed.

    Devlin,T. M. 2011 Textbook of Biochemistry 7thed.

    Koeppen,B.M. and Stanton,B.A. 2010 Bern and Levy Physiology 6thed. updated

    Kumar,V.; Abbas,A.K; Fausto,N. and Aster,J.C. 2010 Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease 8thed.

    Moore,K.L., Agur, A.R. and Dalley,A.F. 2011 Essential Clinically Anatomy 4th ed., Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, ISBN-10: 0781775256

    Wecker,L.; Crespo,L.M.; Dunaway, G.; Faingold,C. and Watts,S. 2010 Brody’s Human Pharmacology, 5thed.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    N/A

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    40% of the grade:

    Exam 1 5%

    Exam 2 10%

    Exam 3 10%

    Exam 4 10%

    Exam 5 10%

    Exam 6 10%

    Final cumulative exam 15%

    60% of the grade:

    Participation, satisfactory completion of assigned projects and evidence of professionalism

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    The students research learning issues that were identified and agreed upon during their small group discussion. Twice per each case the students present their research on the learning issues.

    Each case is subject to a multiple choice examination upon its completion. The course concludes with a comprehensive examination covering all cases.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    B.GMS 7930 Introduction to Medical Sciences

    a. Class Attendance Procedures

    Attendance is mandatory.

    The student must contact the course directors by e-mail or telephone to report his/her absenteeism on the first day of being absent. He/she should indicate the general nature of the emergency. It is at the course director’s discretion to require a make-up assignment from the student.

    b. Exam Attendance Procedures

    Attendance at all examinations is mandatory, and all students should take the examinations on the day and time scheduled.

    If the student has an unanticipated, unplanned absence on the day of an exam, he/she must contact the course directors by e-mail or telephone by 8:30 a.m. on the day of the exam. When the student returns to school he/she must provide documentation of the emergency (e.g. physician’s note, accident report, etc.) to the course director. It is at the course director’s discretion to grant a make-up examination.

    c. Excused absence request procedure

    This procedure is the same whether requesting an excused absence from class or from a scheduled examination. The student has to request an excused absence from the course director via e-mail. It is at the course director’s discretion to grant the request and require a make-up assignment.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    B.GMS 7930 Introduction to Medical Sciences

    a. Class Attendance Procedures

    Attendance is mandatory.

    The student must contact the course directors by e-mail or telephone to report his/her absenteeism on the first day of being absent. He/she should indicate the general nature of the emergency. It is at the course director’s discretion to require a make-up assignment from the student.

    b. Exam Attendance Procedures

    Attendance at all examinations is mandatory, and all students should take the examinations on the day and time scheduled.

    If the student has an unanticipated, unplanned absence on the day of an exam, he/she must contact the course directors by e-mail or telephone by 8:30 a.m. on the day of the exam. When the student returns to school he/she must provide documentation of the emergency (e.g. physician’s note, accident report, etc.) to the course director. It is at the course director’s discretion to grant a make-up examination.

    c. Excused absence request procedure

    This procedure is the same whether requesting an excused absence from class or from a scheduled examination. The student has to request an excused absence from the course director via e-mail. It is at the course director’s discretion to grant the request and require a make-up assignment.

    One of the primary roles of the course faculty is to facilitate the professional development of the students. As part of the professionalism initiative, all students of the Morsani College of Medicine are asked to abide by rigorous standards of academic honesty. Common violations of this include but are not be limited to:

    • lying

    • cheating

    • stealing

    • plagiarizing the work of others

    • causing purposeful or neglectful damage to property

    • impeding the learning process of a colleague

    • jeopardizing patient care in any way

    • failing to report others’ violations

    Studens are encouraged to review the complete USF policy on academic integrity at

    http://www.grad.usf.edu/inc/linked-files/Catalog%20and%20Policies/2011-2012/Section7_AcadIntegrity_2011-2012.html

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Masters of Science in the Medical Sciences with a concetration in Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    None.



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.