Apply to USF Now | Graduate Admissions | Events & Workshops | Giving to the Office of Graduate Studies

Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - LIS6703

Edit function not enabled for this course.


Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-11-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: Recd after 3/1. To Chair; Appd 5/19/14. to USF 5/20/14; to SCNS 5/28/14. Nmbr 6701 Apprd as 6703 eff 11/1/14


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    4833 2013-10-15
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Library and Information Science AS 124800
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Randy Borum 43520 borum@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    LIS 6703 Core Concepts in Intelligence

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Core Concepts in Intelligence
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    O - Online (100% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    No course pre-reqs

    Corequisites

    No course co-reqs

    Course Description

    Introduces intelligence theory, explores the organization and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its interaction with national security policymakers, key issues about its workings, and the challenges it faces in defining its future role.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Necessary foundation for the intelligence studies concentration in the M.S. in Information Studies with a focus on Strategy & Information Analytics and the M.S. in Cybersecurity Concentration in Cyber Intelligence

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Expertise in intelligence theory, systems and collection.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    identify key events, persons, successes and failures in intelligence activities, including their role and influence in history.

    explain the current organizational structures, resources, capabilities and responsibilities of intelligence institutions.

    describe the processes of oversight and accountability in the U.S. Intelligence Community and highlight some of the common ethical issues (and guidelines) when practicing intelligence in statecraft or business.

    outline the process of defining an intelligence organization’s strategy or direction, including making decisions on allocating its resources to pursue this strategy.

    describe the intelligence cycle and the process of collecting, processing and exploiting information used in intelligence products.

    survey the process in which information is analyzed and intelligence products are developed and provided to strategic, operational and tactical consumers.

    address the countering of adversary threats to one’s nation, organization, personnel, systems and information.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    • Discuss the evolution of intelligence from ancient to modern times.

    • Explain the evolution of intelligence as it applies to the academic institution’s home nation.

    • Explain the current intelligence organizations at the academic institution’s home nation national and local levels.

    • Discuss the general characteristics of current intelligence organizations in key foreign nations (adversaries and allies).

    • Name the major legislative oversight bodies for the US Intelligence Community, and describe their functions.

    • Identify key issues in intelligence collection and analysis, and name several sources of authority to guide ethical practice.

    • Demonstrate knowledge of legal and ethical principles applicable to intelligence activities, including intelligence collection, counterintelligence and covert action.

    • Discuss the current organizational structures, functions, capabilities, and responsibilities of intelligence customers.

    • Demonstrate knowledge of applicable national strategies and plans, including their history, inter-relationships, similarities and differences.

    • Explain the strategic planning interface between various levels of the public and private sectors.

    • Employ the latest in strategic and organizational management, organizational behavior, leadership, interagency operations and information sharing procedures used in the intelligence community.

    • Explain the intelligence resource management process.

    • Demonstrate the preparation and presentation of intelligence management written and oral communications.

    • Appraise the use of the "Intelligence Cycle” as a framework for understanding intelligence activities.

    • Discuss processes for prioritizing and tasking the employment of collection assets to support strategic, operational and tactical intelligence analysis.

    • Explain the organization, capabilities, limitations, exploitation and key issues in Human Intelligence (HUMINT) (informant direction) collection operations, both overt and covert.

    • Explain the organization, collection platforms, capabilities, limitations, exploitation and key issues in Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) (wiretaps-eavesdropping) collection operations.

    • Explain the organization, collection platforms, capabilities, limitations, exploitation and key issues in Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT) (imagery-mapping) collection operations.

    • Explain the organization, collection platforms, capabilities, limitations, exploitation and key issues in Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT) (other technical) collection operations.

    • Discuss the contributions, limitations and issues related to collaboration of information and intelligence sharing obtained through foreign services.

    • Describe the issues and challenges in coordinating intelligence collection from multiple sources.

    • Discuss future technologies and their potential impacts on intelligence collection.

    • Formulate analyzable questions through de-construction of the intelligence tasking or problem.

    • Locate and search available databases and other sources to gather existing information and intelligence products, including Open Source Intelligence (OSINT) (publically available information), and identify information gaps.

    • Assess the validity of human and technical information through vetting procedures designed to detect misinterpretations, fabrications, deliberate deceptions, and unacknowledged biases.

    • Explain the challenges of tasking multi-source collection assets to fill identified information gaps.

    • Select appropriate procedures for group analytic efforts (brainstorming, Red Team analysis, Team A/B, etc.).

    • Demonstrate procedures for modeling and hypothesis generation.

    • Employ basic qualitative and quantitative analysis procedures to test hypotheses and develop analytic findings.

    • Demonstrate the ability to present complex data and findings in meaningful ways (e.g., maps, charts, tables, graphs, etc.).

    • Create written and oral reports to convey analytic findings to superiors and customers.

    • Discuss the history of counterintelligence and counterespionage, including recent case studies.

    • Explain the employment of general security measures (physical, personnel, information, cyber, investigations and security management).

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the classification management systems applicable to home nation.

    • Discuss operational security measures.

    • Differentiate between the fields of counterintelligence, counterespionage and counterterrorism.

    C. Major Topics

    Intelligence History

    Intelligence Organizations

    Intelligence: Oversight and Ethics

    Intelligence Planning

    Intelligence Collection

    Intelligence Analysis

    Counterintelligence and Security

    D. Textbooks

    Johnson, L. (2012). National Security Intelligence. Malden, MA: Polity Press.

    Richelson, J. (2011). The US Intelligence Community, 6th Edition. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Supplemental readings will be provided online. No other purchase of materials is necessary.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Grading Scale: The following grading scale will be applied:

    90% - 100% is an A

    80% - 89% is a B

    70% - 79% is a C

    60% - 69% is a D

    less than 60% is an F.

    The grade will be judged and weighted on the following basis:

    Presentation and Reading Quizzes: 65%

    Final Exam: 25%

    Final Project: 10%

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Quizzes will be given every two weeks covering material from the readings, presentations and multimedia material during that two-week period.

    A final project consists of an analytic memo and an electronic briefing.

    The final exam is cumulative.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Policy on Make-up Work

    As a general policy, there are no make-ups for quizzes, projects or the final exam. If a student wishes to submit an assignment late, the instructor may accept it at his/her discretion and assess a suitable grade penalty.

    System Emergencies

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It is the responsibility of the student to monitor the Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    Scheduled Absences

    Students are expected to notify their instructors at the beginning of each academic term if they intend to be absent for a class or announced examination for religious reasons. They will be given reasonable opportunities to make up any work missed. For further information, please refer to: http://generalcounsel.usf.edu/policies-and-procedures/pdfs/policy-10-045.pdf

    Academic Dishonesty

    The University of South Florida has in place specific policies and procedures regarding academic dishonesty or disruption of academic process (also see below for more detail). Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to: copying or relying on another’s work and using it as your own; representing work you previously prepared for another class as work that was prepared for this class; and using any material during a quiz exam that has not been approved by the professor.

    Academic dishonesty will result in a grade of “FF” and, possible dismissal from the program. An “FF” received as a result of academic dishonesty puts you on Academic Warning for the remainder of your time at USF. A class in which you receive an “FF” as a result of academic dishonesty is not repeatable. All papers, research, and examinations will be monitored carefully and students found cheating will be punished to the fullest extent allowed by the University and the Department.

    In an effort to ensure compliance, plagiarism tracking software (SafeAssign) may be employed in this course. The University of South Florida has an account with an automated plagiarism detection service which allows instructors to submit student assignments to be checked for plagiarism. Your assignments may be submitted to this detection system, in which they are compared to a large database of journal articles, web articles, and previously submitted papers. Because all papers will be submitted to SafeAssign, you should know your rights:

    You may be required to submit your paper to a plagiarism detection site that will be identified by your instructor. In order to comply with federal (FERPA) and state privacy laws, you (students) are not required to include personal identifying information such as your name, SSN, and/or U# in the body of the work (text) or use such information in the file naming convention prior to submitting. Please follow carefully your instructor’s instructions regarding what identifying information to include. Your submission will be placed in the course grade center in your account that can be accessed by the instructor and attributed to you.

    If you have any questions, please refer to USF’s Procedures for Alleged Academic Dishonesty or Disruption – http://www.ugs.usf.edu/catalogs/0809/adap.htm and Student Academic Grievance Procedures – http://www.ugs.usf.edu/catalogs/0809/arcsagp.htm

    J. Program This Course Supports

    M.S. in Information Studies with a focus on Strategy & Information Analytics


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    M.S. in Cybersecurity Concentration in Cyber Intelligence



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.