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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - SCE6876

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-11-01
Campus: St Petersburg
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only): This is a a request to replace a selected topics course number with a permanent course number.
Comments: Approved by USFSP. To USF Sys 8/14/14. To SCNS after 8/21. Nmbr 6844 approved as 6876 Effective 11/1/14


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    4820 2013-09-17
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    EP USFO1STP 511724 10000 000000000000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Lyman Dukes 7278734991 ldukes@usfsp.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    SCE 6876 Teaching Biology & Ocean Science in Middle Grades

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    MG Biology & Ocean Science
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    n/a

    Corequisites

    n/a

    Course Description

    This is a graduate level course for middle school teachers to further their knowledge and pedagogy in teaching the Life Sciences concepts comprising the Next Generation National Science Standards.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Replacing Selected Topics with Permanent number; already listed in program

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course is part of the required sequence in the approved Middle Grades STEM graduate degree program.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 3 or more times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    A Doctoral degree and at least 18 credit hours in the discipline are required.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The purpose of this course is to assist teachers in developing STEM science content knowledge and experiencing first hand inquiry teaching. You may not teach this depth of science content to your own students, but understanding life sciences and math will increase your ability to teach and guide your students in understanding less complex STEM science and math content. In addition, understanding the science content will be invaluable to you in using inquiry as a teaching pedagogy. It is hoped that by seeing inquiry modeled in a way in which you may learn deep science content in a meaningful manner you will endeavor to use these practices in your own teaching.

    This is a graduate level course for middle school teachers to further their knowledge and pedagogy in teaching the Life Sciences concepts comprising the Next Generation National Science Standards. Students in this course will have the opportunity to expand their science knowledge and skills through experiential and inquiry-based teaching and learning. The connections of course activities to the National Science Standards 6-9, and the Florida State Science Standards 6-9 will be addressed.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this class, a student will be expected to:

    1. Expand her/his knowledge of science as a human activity in the context of school (Florida’s Accomplished Practices 1, 4, 8, 9);

    2. Demonstrate the skills related to the process of science, as they apply to the learning of the life sciences by school children, including specific ESOL strategies for students at various levels of proficiency (Florida’s ESOL Standards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 12,13, 14, 18; Florida’s Accomplished Practices 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12);

    3. Appreciate the importance of science teaching in the intellectual growth of school children (Florida’s Accomplished Practices 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9);

    4. Apply the appropriate assessment strategies to determine the progress of children’s learning of science (Florida’s ESOL Standards 13, 14, 15, 16, 17,18, 19, 20, 21; Florida’s Accomplished Practices 1, 4, 5, 8, 9);

    5. Apply the knowledge obtained from previous education courses to the teaching of science (Florida’s Accomplished Practices 1, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11);

    6. Reflect on their classroom experience in teaching science in in relation to the standards articulated in the Next Generation National Science Education Standards and Florida Sunshine State Science Standards (Florida’s Accomplished Practices 1, 4, 8, 9, 10, 11);

    7. Show mastery of K-9 life science content.

    Florida Educator Accomplished Practices: The Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) assessed in this course include:

    FEAPS: INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND LESSON PLANNING

    a. Aligns instruction with state-adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor.

    b. Sequences lessons and concepts to ensure coherence and required prior knowledge.

    c. Designs instruction for students to achieve mastery.

    d. Selects appropriate formative assessments to monitor learning.

    e. Uses diagnostic student data to plan lessons.

    f. Develops learning experiences that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and competencies.

    FEAPS: THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    d. Respects students’ cultural linguistic and family background.

    e. Models clear, acceptable oral and written communication skills.

    f. Maintains a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness and support.

    g. Integrates current information and communication technologies.

    h. Adapts the learning environment to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students.

    FEAPS: INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY AND FACILITATION

    a. Deliver engaging and challenging lessons.

    b. Deepen and enrich students’ understanding through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the subject matter.

    c. Identify gaps in students’ subject matter knowledge.

    d. Modify instruction to respond to preconceptions or misconceptions.

    e. Relate and integrate the subject matter with other disciplines and life experiences.

    f. Employ higher-order questioning techniques.

    g. Apply varied instructional strategies and resources, including appropriate technology, to provide comprehensible instruction and to teach for student understanding.

    h. Differentiate instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students.

    i. Support, encourage, and provide immediate and specific feedback to students to promote student achievement.

    j. Utilize student feedback to monitor instructional needs and to adjust instruction.

    C. Major Topics

    Show mastery of content from the Florida Science Standards Big Ideas for 6-9th grade.

    Big Idea 1: the practice of science,

    Big Idea 2: characteristics of scientific knowledge,

    Big Idea 3: the role of theories, laws, hypotheses, and models,

    Big Idea 4: science and society

    Big Idea 14: Organization & Development of Living Organisms

    Big Idea 15: Diversity and Evolution of Living Organisms-

    Big Idea 16: Heredity and Reproduction-

    Big Idea 17: Interdependence-

    Big Idea 18: Matter and Energy Transformations-

    D. Textbooks

    No textbook is currently required for this course

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    There will numerous readings available online that will be required readings for this course for example:

    • Bransford, J.D., A.L. Brown, and R.R. Cocking, eds. 2000. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. 374p.

    https://download.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=9853

    • Donovan, M.S., J.D. Bransford, and J.W. Pellegrino, eds. 1999. How People Learn: Bridging Research and Practice. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. 99p. [Available] http://www.nap.edu/catalog/9457.html

    • Florida Department of Education. Next Generation Sunshine State Science Standards [Available] http://tools.fcit.usf.edu/sss/index.php

    • National Research Council (1996). National Science Education Standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. [Available] http://newton.nap.edu/catalog/4962.html

    • National Research Council (2000). Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. [Available] http://newton.nap.edu/catalog/9596.html

    • National Research Council (1999). Selecting instructional materials: A guide for k-12 science. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. [Available] http://newton.nap.edu/catalog/9607.html

    • Pellegrin, J.W., Chudowsky, N., & Glaser, R. (2001). Knowing what students know: The science and design of educational measurement. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. [Available] http://newton.nap.edu/catalog/10019.html

    • Schoedinger, S., Cava, F., & Jewell, B. (2006). The need for ocean literacy in the classroom. The Science Teacher, pp. 44-52.

    • Simich-Dudgeon. C & Egbert J. (2000). Science as a Second Language. The Science Teacher, pp. 28-32

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Grading Policy and Procedures

    A. Science Autobiography: 25 points

    B. Science Journal post online at Blackboard course site: 100 points

    C. Coastal Ecology Field Trip(s): 75 points

    D. Concept Maps: midterm C-map = 25pts and final C-map = 75pts: 100 points

    E. Ecosystem Food Web integrating NGSS: 75 points

    F. In-Class Presentation: Ecosystem Food Web with Rubric or Scoring Guide 50 points

    G. In-Class participation (must be present in class for points): 75 points

    TOTAL POSSIBLE POINTS: 500 points

    Your final grade will be based on the points that you earn throughout the course:

    Grade Percent

    A 90 and above

    B 89-80

    C 79-70

    D 69-65

    F below 65

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    1. Science Autobiography (25 points): This is a writing exercise designed so you will explore your feelings about science. Write candidly and freely about your evolving experience with science and your beliefs about it. It does not matter how limited or extensive your experiences are, only that you describe them. Your science autobiography should be a personal description of your experiences with science, in or out of school, through teachers, friends, family, museums, magazines, and other sources. These questions can help you to think about the task: When you look back at your science education, what do you see? How much science did you study in school? Did you like science? Hate it? Did you ever even think about it? What personal experiences with school science, scientists, science in the media, and science teachers stand out to you? There is no prescribed length or format for your science autobiography. It is your story and needs to reflect your experiences. (adapted from Science Stories, J. Koch, 2002)

    2. Life Science Learning Journal (75 points): This assignment is intended to a) serve as a learning log to let you and others understand how you are making sense of your experiences in this course, and b) be a stimulus for discussion among this community of learners (students and instructors). Keep an extensive reflective journal or learning log that integrates the meanings you are constructing from your various experiences related to this course. Include a list of resources examined during the week or experiences (teaching experience, school event, science in the news, discussions, reading assignments) about which you are reflecting. Identify questions that emerged for you and your speculations about answers to those questions. Review the ‘Guide to Journal Entries 3 R’s’ outlined below .

    3. Field Trip to Marine Environment (50 points): As a group we will visit Clam Bayou (or Fort Desoto Marine Park). While at the site you will attempt to see the site ‘through the eyes of a child’. What do you see? What do you want to do while you are there? What things do you enjoy? What things do you not enjoy? What questions are you asking? After the visit, be prepared to make a 5-10 minute presentation in class describing your visit. What did you experience and learn? What science was happening? What science skills did you use? How would you describe the 3 marine habitats that we visited? What would you want to do if you visited a second time? What would you do with your students? Each student will also hand in a list of ten questions that they generate from the field experience.

    4. Concept Maps (100 points): Concept mapping is a great way to assess and visualize your students understanding of information. We will learn to use concept mapping as assessment tools in the classroom. Students will be expected to prepare two concept maps dealing with the information covered in this class. Map 2 will build on map 1. Concept maps can be produced using a software program such as Inspiration (go to www.inspiration.com for a free trial version), or another software package of your choice. The concept maps you will construct for this class will have the following title, ‘What Life Science Concepts I am Learning & How concepts are connected to FSPSS Benchmarks’. You will turn in your first concept map mid-semester, Concept Map # 1 (25 pts). You will continue to build your map as the semester progresses, Concept Map # 2 (75 pts). You will turn in a final concept map the last week of November.

    5. Marine Ecosystem Food Web (75 points): Construction of one Marine Ecosystem Food Web is required in this course. You need to make sure your food web incorporates as many Next Generation Science Standards Benchmarks as appropriate for the elementary and/or middle grades. To augment your Food Web share electronically 3 existing inquiry-based lesson plans to address 3 NGSS Big Ideas; these lesson plans should be developmentally appropriate, and address specific ESOL strategies for students at various levels of proficiency. A detailed format for the ecosystem food web is attached to this syllabus.

    In Class Presentation: Marine Ecosystem Food Web (25 points): Individually, you have to present your Marine Ecosystem Food Web to the whole class. This presentation needs to be 20 minutes long with inclusion of your audience and examples of 3 supplemental inquiry activities. Be creative in how you present the Ecosystem Food Web, integrate technology, art, drama, A key element for your presentation is to demonstrate the integration of Next Generation Science Standard Benchmarks across elementary and/or middle grade levels and provide an example of a rubric or detailed scoring guide for the class presentation that you might use with your students.

    6. In-class Participation (75 points): Engage in discussions, activities and attend each class; points deducted for unexcused absences

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Reference: USF Regulation USF 3.027 - The following is the portion of the Regulation pertaining to graduate students. To read the entire regulation, go to: http://generalcounsel.usf.edu/regulations/pdfs/regulation-usf3.027.pdf

    1. Fundamental Principles

    Academic integrity is the foundation of the University of South Florida system’s (University/USF) commitment to the academic honesty and personal integrity of its University community. Academic integrity is grounded in certain fundamental values, which include honesty, respect and fairness. Broadly defined, academic honesty is the completion of all academic endeavors and claims of scholarly knowledge as representative of one’s own efforts. Knowledge and maintenance of the academic standards of honesty and integrity as set forth by the University are the responsibility of the entire academic community, including the instructional faculty, staff and students.

    2. General Policies

    The following policies and procedures apply to all students, instructional faculty and staff who participate in administration of academic classes, programs and research at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg and the USF system. This regulation asserts fairness in that it requires notice to any student accused of a violation of academic integrity and provides a directive for discussion between the instructor and student to seek a fair and equitable resolution. If a fair resolution is not accomplished in this discussion, this regulation allows the student continued rights of due process under the academic grievance procedures based upon the preponderance of the evidence. The policies described below are the only policies and procedures that govern violations of academic integrity at the University and supersede any previous policies or regulations.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Middle Grades STEM degree program


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.