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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - ATR5307C

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-04-30
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: GC approved; to USF Sys 10/22/13. to SCNS 10/30/13. Approved Effective 12/1/13. Nmbr 5341c approved as 5307c


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    4783 2013-07-29
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Medicine MD HSC-10000-613900-000000-000000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Steven Zinder 8133969464 szinder@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    ATR 5307C Therapeutic Interventions II

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    4 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Therapeutic Interventions II
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    Theory and application methods of comprehensive therapeutic treatment and rehabilitation programs for injuries commonly sustained by the physically active.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course is part of the core coursework for the proposed Master’s Degree in Athletic Training. The profession of Athletic Training is following other allied health professions and heading toward the entry point being at the graduate level. This is a proactive step in that direction, and will put USF at the forefront of Athletic Training education. There will be significant demand for the program, in that as of this point, there is no avenue for students that have obtained a bachelor’s degree in another discipline to challenge the National Board of Certification exam for Athletic Training. Presently, there is only one other institution in Florida (FIU) with an entry -level graduate Athletic Training Program.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Certified Athletic Trainer, MD, PhD, or equivalent.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Apply the theoretical, clinical, and scientific aspects associated with the use of prescribed therapeutic interventions in a health care setting.

    2. Implement acceptable ethics, values, and legal aspects of therapeutic interventions selection and use.

    3. Appreciate the need to evaluate the “whole” athlete, not the specific disorder

    4. Appreciates and applies knowledge and skills equally to all patients (age, gender, ethnicity, etc)

    5. Explain the known usage patterns, general effects, and short- and long-term adverse effects for the commonly used performance-enhancing substances.

    6. Identify which therapeutic drugs and non-therapeutic substances are banned by sport and/or workplace organizations in order to properly advise patients about possible disqualification and other consequences.

    7. Explain the role of the systematic injury evaluation process in establishing a rehabilitation plan and treatment goals.

    8. Understand and apply techniques used to re-establish neuromuscular control following an injury.

    9. Understand and apply techniques used to restore range-of-motion and improve flexibility.

    10. Understand and apply techniques used to regain muscular strength, endurance, and power following an injury.

    11. Understand and apply techniques used to regain postural stability and balance following an injury.

    12. Understand and apply techniques used to maintain cardiorespiratory fitness during the rehabilitation program.

    13. Understand and apply techniques used to improve core stabilization during the rehabilitation process.

    14. Understand and apply plyometric techniques used during the rehabilitation process.

    15. Understand open-versus closed-kinetic-chain exercises used during the rehabilitation process.

    16. Understand the uses and limitations of isokinetics in rehabilitation.

    17. Understand and apply PNF and other soft-tissue mobilization techniques used in the rehabilitation process.

    18. Understand and apply therapeutic modalities as they relate to the rehabilitation process.

    19. Understand and apply the principles of aquatic therapy utilized during the rehabilitation process.

    20. Understand and apply the use of functional progressions and functional testing during the rehabilitation process.

    21. Understand and apply techniques, progressions, and structure of rehabilitation programs for injuries to the: shoulder; elbow; wrist, hand, and fingers; cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, and the sacroiliac joint; groin, hip, and thigh; knee; lower leg; and ankle and foot.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1. Apply the theoretical, clinical, and scientific aspects associated with the use of prescribed therapeutic interventions in a health care setting.

    2. Implement acceptable ethics, values, and legal aspects of therapeutic interventions selection and use.

    3. Appreciate the need to evaluate the “whole” athlete, not the specific disorder

    4. Appreciates and applies knowledge and skills equally to all patients (age, gender, ethnicity, etc)

    5. Explain the known usage patterns, general effects, and short- and long-term adverse effects for the commonly used performance-enhancing substances.

    6. Identify which therapeutic drugs and non-therapeutic substances are banned by sport and/or workplace organizations in order to properly advise patients about possible disqualification and other consequences.

    7. Explain the role of the systematic injury evaluation process in establishing a rehabilitation plan and treatment goals.

    8. Understand and apply techniques used to re-establish neuromuscular control following an injury.

    9. Understand and apply techniques used to restore range-of-motion and improve flexibility.

    10. Understand and apply techniques used to regain muscular strength, endurance, and power following an injury.

    11. Understand and apply techniques used to regain postural stability and balance following an injury.

    12. Understand and apply techniques used to maintain cardiorespiratory fitness during the rehabilitation program.

    13. Understand and apply techniques used to improve core stabilization during the rehabilitation process.

    14. Understand and apply plyometric techniques used during the rehabilitation process.

    15. Understand open-versus closed-kinetic-chain exercises used during the rehabilitation process.

    16. Understand the uses and limitations of isokinetics in rehabilitation.

    17. Understand and apply PNF and other soft-tissue mobilization techniques used in the rehabilitation process.

    18. Understand and apply therapeutic modalities as they relate to the rehabilitation process.

    19. Understand and apply the principles of aquatic therapy utilized during the rehabilitation process.

    20. Understand and apply the use of functional progressions and functional testing during the rehabilitation process.

    21. Understand and apply techniques, progressions, and structure of rehabilitation programs for injuries to the: shoulder; elbow; wrist, hand, and fingers; cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, and the sacroiliac joint; groin, hip, and thigh; knee; lower leg; and ankle and foot.

    C. Major Topics

    Performance Enhancing Substances

    Neuromuscular Control

    Cardiorespiratory Fitness During the Rehabilitation Process

    Core Stabilization

    Open versus Closed-Kinetic Chain Exercises

    PNF Techniques

    Isokinetics

    Aquatic Therapy

    Functional Testing During the Rehabilitation Process

    D. Textbooks

    1. Denegar CR. 2010. Therapeutic Modalities for Athletic Injuries, 3rd Ed . Human Kinetics

    2. Mangus BC, Miller MG, 2005. Pharmacology Application in Athletic Training, FA Davis, Co

    3. Prentice WE. Rehabilitation Techniques for Sports Medicine and Athletic Training. 2004; 5th ed. McGraw Hill, New York, NY.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Weekly readings will be posted on Canvas as warranted.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Exams (3) 35%

    Final Exam (written) 10%

    Lab Practical 10%

    Case Report

    - Written 15%

    - Oral 5%

    Journal Summary 5%

    Laboratory Participation 15%

    Professionalism 5%

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Examinations: Three examinations will be given during the course of the semester. These examinations are intended to assess the student's awareness and understanding of the concepts covered by the course content. Items on these examinations will be derived from the text, assigned readings and discussions. The content of each examination will usually mirror the content of the unit most recently studied. Examination methodology may include multiple choice, true-false questions, fill-ins, and short answer. There may also be a practical (hands-on) portion to these examinations.

    Students will not be allowed to leave the classroom at any time during an examination without permission of the professor. Any student who leaves the classroom during an examination will forfeit the exam score, with the exception of an immediate emergency circumstance.

    Laboratory Participation: Laboratory attendance and participation is mandatory; students are also required to complete the required lab assignments. Because there is no opportunity to make-up laboratory sessions held during the semester, it is best to avoid missing class on lab days. Also, because some clinical sites may not have the appropriate equipment to demonstrate and teach the competencies and to practice the related proficiencies, laboratory attendance will ensure that the student has received the initial information related to laboratory competencies and provides the student an opportunity to practice the requisite proficiencies. If conflicts exist due to clinical education travel or any other extenuating circumstance, it is the responsibility of the student to inform the professor of such circumstances beforehand. Labs should take priority over clinical education assignments, surgery observations, etc.

    Laboratory Attire: On days which class will be held in a laboratory setting students will be expected to wear attire appropriate for the application of each modality. Shorts, t-shirt, and sneakers are appropriate unless otherwise stated in lecture. Inappropriate attire will result in an incomplete laboratory experience and reduced grade for that lab.

    Case Study

    Written: The case study assignment entails a written and oral portion (see next section for details on oral portion). You will be required to present the findings of the case study to the class. You may also be selected by the USF ATEP to present at Student SEATA.

    a. The case study shall be based on an athlete’s case with which you are familiar (preferably one in which you have been or will be involved with the rehabilitation).

    b. The case study should include an emphasis on therapeutic exercise.

    c. Previous case studies may not be used for this assignment.

    d. Only a select number of case study abstracts will be approved by the ATEP at USF for submission to Student SEATA. If your case study is selected for submission and Student SEATA then selects your case study, you will be expected to attend the conference.

    e. Students are strongly encouraged to seek feedback from their ACI’s, professors, peers regarding their case study prior to the due date

    f. See Grading Rubric included and examples of previous case studies on Canvas.

    Oral: This presentation will be used to assess the student’s ability to effectively communicate with their professional colleagues, their ability to comprehend and synthesize rehabilitation concepts, their creativity, and ability to support their decision making process.

    a. The presentation will be between 5 to 8 minutes

    i. Present your case (focus on treatment) be sure to discuss uniqueness, keys to success, and final outcome of case—more than just reading your abstract.

    b. The content will be based on the injury used for the case study

    c. PowerPoint presentation is REQUIRED during the presentation

    d. Students will be evaluated via a grading rubric (which will be presented prior to presentation)

    e. Audience will include pre-athletic training students as well as other athletic trainers, athletic training faculty, and other athletic training students.

    f. Students are expected to be dressed professionally for the presentation

    Please include the following information in your case study:

    1. Must have a signed permission from athlete for access to their medical records (this form will be provided)

    2. You will be following the Student SEATA format for abstracts for clinical case reports.

    3. Student SEATA formatting and subject headings MUST be followed (these details will be provided).

    4. Focus again should be a STRONG treatment section.

    Each project must be approved in advance to assure that there are no duplicate injuries/individuals being presented. Projects not approved will receive a grade of “0” and no written papers will be accepted or oral presentations allowed for the individual. Projects approved later than one week prior to the date of the first presentation will receive a decreased full letter grade for each day not approved after the deadline.

    Journal Articles: Journal articles are designed to familiarize students with current peer-reviewed and published research regarding therapeutic modalities. Students will be expected to bring an appropriate research article from a peer-reviewed journal relating to the topic on the syllabus for that day. During the course of the semester, each student will be required to turn in one journal article review. Each review should include the student’s summary of the article and his/her perception of the results. A copy of the full text article including references is required with submission for a passing grade. There will be a sign up sheet with the due date for your article summary. Students should be prepared to discuss the article with the class, conveying the purpose and findings of the study. Grades will be based upon oral presentation and article summary (A grading rubric will be provided on Canvas). Changes to the assignments may be made at any time by the instructor (in advance) to suit class material to be covered. Please be sure that each article is found in a peer-reviewed journal. It is the student’s responsibility to locate acceptable journal articles, so if you are unsure of the manuscript’s quality, please consult with the professor ahead of time. Students who are late to class on their designated class will still be able to hand in the article but will be deducted 50 points (50%) from the final grade for a missed presentation.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Make up of missed work will be permitted, but points will be taken off for turning in work after the due date. No work will be accepted two weeks past its original due date and all course work must be turned in by the last day of class to receive credit.

    Academic Dishonesty:

    (USF POLICY)

    Each individual is expected to earn his/her degree on the basis of personal effort. Any form of cheating on examinations or plagiarism on assigned papers constitutes unacceptable deceit and dishonesty. Plagiarism is defined as “literary theft” and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text, or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally know to the public at large must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one's own, segments or the total of another person's work. Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an “F” with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the “F” shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student a grade of F or FF (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.

    Detection of Plagiarism:

    The University of South Florida has an account with an automated plagiarism detection service, which allows instructors to submit student assignments to be checked for plagiarism. I reserve the right to 1) request that assignments be submitted to me as electronic files and 2) electronically submit assignments to Turnitin.com. Assignments are compared automatically with a huge database of journal articles, web articles, and previously submitted papers. The instructor receives a report showing exactly how a student's paper was plagiarized.

    For more information about Academic Integrity of Graduate Students see http://www1.usfsp.edu/catalog-grad/academic-integrity-of-students.htm

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Masterof Science in Athletic Training


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    None



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.