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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - ATR5346C

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-04-30
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: GC approved; to USF Sys 10/22/13. to SCNS 10/30/13. Approved Effective 12/1/13. Nmbr 5350C apprd as 5346C


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    4780 2013-07-15
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Medicine MD HSC-10000-613900-000000-000000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Steven Zinder 8133969464 szinder@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    ATR 5346C Health and Wellness Promotion Across the Lifespan I

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Health and Wellness I
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    Integrates physiological, psychological, and social understanding of humans in relationship to physical activity as a lifelong pursuit. Includes physical fitness, nutrition, stress reduction, socialization, and individual differences in human behavior.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course is part of the core coursework for the proposed Master’s Degree in Athletic Training. The profession of Athletic Training is following other allied health professions and heading toward the entry point being at the graduate level. This is a proactive step in that direction, and will put USF at the forefront of Athletic Training education. There will be significant demand for the program, in that as of this point, there is no avenue for students that have obtained a bachelor’s degree in another discipline to challenge the National Board of Certification exam for Athletic Training. Presently, there is only one other institution in Florida (FIU) with an entry -level graduate Athletic Training Program.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Certified Athletic Trainer, MD, PhD, or equivalent.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Apply theoretical and conceptual models of health-related behavior, health promotion, and illness prevention to individuals, families, and groups for older adults

    2. Distinguish between behaviors that foster and those that hinder well-being in later years.

    3. Assess intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors that relate to health promotion and illness prevention.

    4. Develop health promotion and/or clinical preventive care programs for individuals and groups of older adults from diverse ethnic and sociocultural backgrounds.

    5. Examine empirical basis for selected complementary (non-pharmacological) therapeutics.

    6. Compare and contrast health status indices for cross cultural aging populations.

    7. Designate outcome measures appropriate for selected health promotion programs.

    8. To demonstrate an understanding of the effects of physical inactivity on mortality and aging.

    9. To demonstrate an understanding of the physiological benefits of physical activity and identify the major components of physical fitness.

    10. To demonstrate an understanding of the psychological dimensions of exercise and well being.

    11. To demonstrate an understanding of the process of anxiety & stress and how to elicit their reduction.

    12. To demonstrate an understanding of proper nutrition & diet and the negative consequences of an improper diet.

    13. Distinguish six classes of nutrients and describe their major functions.

    14. Explain the importance of good nutrition in enhancing performance and preventing injuries.

    15. Assess the advantages and disadvantages of dietary supplements.

    16. Discuss popular eating and drinking practices.

    17. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of consuming a pre-event meal

    18. Differentiate between body weight and body composition.

    19. Explain the principle of caloric balance and how to assess it.

    20. Assess body composition using skin fold calipers and bio-electrical impedance.

    21. Evaluate methods of losing and gaining weight.

    22. Recognize the signs of bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa.

    23. Understand and complete screening procedures for a health appraisal risk assessment.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1. Apply theoretical and conceptual models of health-related behavior, health promotion, and illness prevention to individuals, families, and groups for older adults

    2. Distinguish between behaviors that foster and those that hinder well-being in later years.

    3. Assess intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors that relate to health promotion and illness prevention.

    4. Develop health promotion and/or clinical preventive care programs for individuals and groups of older adults from diverse ethnic and sociocultural backgrounds.

    5. Examine empirical basis for selected complementary (non-pharmacological) therapeutics.

    6. Compare and contrast health status indices for cross cultural aging populations.

    7. Designate outcome measures appropriate for selected health promotion programs.

    8. To demonstrate an understanding of the effects of physical inactivity on mortality and aging.

    9. To demonstrate an understanding of the physiological benefits of physical activity and identify the major components of physical fitness.

    10. To demonstrate an understanding of the psychological dimensions of exercise and well being.

    11. To demonstrate an understanding of the process of anxiety & stress and how to elicit their reduction.

    12. To demonstrate an understanding of proper nutrition & diet and the negative consequences of an improper diet.

    13. Distinguish six classes of nutrients and describe their major functions.

    14. Explain the importance of good nutrition in enhancing performance and preventing injuries.

    15. Assess the advantages and disadvantages of dietary supplements.

    16. Discuss popular eating and drinking practices.

    17. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of consuming a pre-event meal

    18. Differentiate between body weight and body composition.

    19. Explain the principle of caloric balance and how to assess it.

    20. Assess body composition using skin fold calipers and bio-electrical impedance.

    21. Evaluate methods of losing and gaining weight.

    22. Recognize the signs of bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa.

    23. Understand and complete screening procedures for a health appraisal risk assessment.

    C. Major Topics

    Lifelong Wellness

    Health Promotion

    Illness Prevention

    Exercise and Well Being

    Nutrition

    D. Textbooks

    Hoeger & Hoeger (11th Ed., 2011) Lifetime Physical Fitness & Wellness – a personalized program. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth, Cengage learning

    Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning/National Strength and Conditioning Association, 3rd Edition (2008). Thomas R. Baechle & Roger w. Earle, Human Kinetics,

    ISBN # 13: 978-0-7360-5803-2

    Optional: NSCA’s Guide to Sport and Exercise Nutrition/National Strength and Conditioning Association, (2011). Bill J. Campbell & Marie A. Spano, Human Kinetics, ISBN #13: 0-7360-8349-2

    Optional: NSCA’s Guide to Program Design/National Strength a

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Weekly readings will be posted on Canvas as warranted

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Written Exams 30%

    Assignments/Quizzes 25%

    Presentation 15%

    Practical Examination 25%

    Professionalism 5%

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Assignments: Minimum of ten performance based field tests to be completed per protocol. Various other written assignments.

    Quizzes: Multiple choice and short answer.

    Class Participation/Professionalism: students are expected to participate in class discussion and lab activities.

    Written Paper: Needs Analysis based on results of field test and identified goals of athlete. Content, grammar and references will be evaluated.

    Practical Examination: The practical examination is designed to assess students recognition and understanding of lifting techniques, safety precautions, testing design as well as muscle involvement.

    Presentation: Student will select a topic related to exercise prescription and testing and make oral presentation to class.

    Written Examinations (3) & Comprehensive Final Exam: Written examinations are intended to assess the student’s awareness and understanding of the concepts covered by course content. Items on these examinations will be derived from the text and class discussion. The content of each examination will usually mirror the content of the unit most recently studied. Examination methodology may include multiple choice, true-false and short answer questions. The final examination will be cumulative.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Make up of missed work will be permitted, but points will be taken off for turning in work after the due date. No work will be accepted two weeks past its original due date and all course work must be turned in by the last day of class to receive credit.

    Academic Dishonesty:

    (USF POLICY)

    Each individual is expected to earn his/her degree on the basis of personal effort. Any form of cheating on examinations or plagiarism on assigned papers constitutes unacceptable deceit and dishonesty. Plagiarism is defined as “literary theft” and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text, or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally know to the public at large must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one's own, segments or the total of another person's work. Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an “F” with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the “F” shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student a grade of F or FF (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.

    Detection of Plagiarism:

    The University of South Florida has an account with an automated plagiarism detection service, which allows instructors to submit student assignments to be checked for plagiarism. I reserve the right to 1) request that assignments be submitted to me as electronic files and 2) electronically submit assignments to Turnitin.com. Assignments are compared automatically with a huge database of journal articles, web articles, and previously submitted papers. The instructor receives a report showing exactly how a student's paper was plagiarized.

    For more information about Academic Integrity of Graduate Students see http://www1.usfsp.edu/catalog-grad/academic-integrity-of-students.htm

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Masterof Science in Athletic Training


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    None



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