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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - MAN6140

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-04-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: Change
Course Change Information (for course changes only): Change from 2 credits to 3 credits. This will make it consistent with other electives in the college, thus making the course more attractive to other majors.
Comments: Required for MS in Mgmt; update credits; to GC. Apprd 12/10/13; To USF Sys 2/4/14, to SCNS 2/12/14. approved eff 4/1/14


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    4761 2013-07-05
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Management BA 140500
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Dr. Sally Riggs Fuller 8139741766 sfuller@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    MAN 6140 Decision Making & Problem Solving

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times?

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    2 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Decision Making & Prob. Solv.
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    Course explores organization decision making from a variety of perspectives: inquiry on how decisions happen in organizations, recent developments from prospect theory, the role of evidence-based management, and dealing with the unexpected.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    40 - 50 students per semester

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Doctorate and experience and/or research in the area of decision making and problem solving


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    • Provide research and other knowledge about the decision-making processes of individuals and organizations.

    • Describe evidence-based management.

    • Apply knowledge to organizational decisions.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    • Demonstrate acquired knowledge concerning methods by which individuals and organizations make decisions.

    • Identify barriers to evidence-based management.

    • Understand decision processes under conditions of uncertainty.

    • Apply knowledge to real-world situations.

    C. Major Topics

    decision making,problem solving, uncertainty, evidence-based management

    D. Textbooks

    1. March, J.G. (1994). A Primer on Decision Making: How Decisions Happen. New York: The Free Press.

    2. Pfeffer, J. & Sutton, R.I. (2006). Hard Facts Dangerous Half-Truths & Total Nonsense: Profiting From Evidence-Based Management. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Additional readings posted on Blackboard/Canvas

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    25% - participation, contributions to class learning

    25% - application essay

    50% - final essay exam

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    March 6th

    Introduction & Get Acquainted

    CLASS

    1. Orientation and Get Acquainted Exercise

    2. Film:

    Decision Analysis: Why Don’t We Naturally Make Good Decisions?

    March 13th - - SPRING BREAK

    March 20th

    READINGS

    1. Buchanan, L. & O’Connell, A. (2006). A Brief History of Decision Making. Harvard Business Review, 83(1), 32-41. [Blackboard]

    2. March, J.G. (2006). Ideas as Art. Harvard Business Review, 83(10), 83-89. [Blackboard]

    3. March, J.G. (1994). A Primer on Decision Making: How Decisions Happen. New York: The Free Press. Preface (pp. vii-ix) & Chapter 1 (pp. 1-23).

    CLASS

    1. Search and Tell

    2. Lecture

    3. Discussion

    March 27th

    READINGS

    1. March, J.G. (1994). A Primer on Decision Making: How Decisions Happen. New York: The Free Press. Chapter 1 (pp. 23-55) & Chapter 2 (pp.37-102).

    2. Mintzberg, H. (1971). Managerial Work: Analysis from Observation. Management Science, 18(2), B-97—B-110. [Blackboard]

    CLASS

    1. Search and Tell

    2. Lecture

    3. Discussion

    April 3rd

    READINGS

    1. March, J.G. (1994). A Primer on Decision Making: How Decisions Happen. New York: The Free Press. Chapter 5 (pp. 175-219).

    2. Kahneman, D. (2003). A Psychological Perspective on Economics. American Economic Review, 53(2), 162-168. [Blackboard]

    3. Lovallo, D. & Kahneman, D. (2003). Delusions of Success: How Optimism Undermines Executives’ Decisions. Harvard Business Review, 81(7), 56-63. [Blackboard]

    CLASS

    1. Search and Tell

    2. Lecture

    3. Discussion

    4. Film:

    a. Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense: Profiting from Evidence-Based Managemen7

    April 10th

    READINGS

    1. Campbell, D.T. & Stanley, J.C. (1963). Experimental and Quasi-Experimental. [Packet]

    2. Pfeffer, J. & Sutton, R.I. (2006). Hard Facts Dangerous Half-Truths & Total Nonsense: Profiting From Evidence-Based Management. Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Preface (pp. ix-x), Part I (pp. 3-53), and Chapters 3-5.

    CLASS

    1. Search and Tell

    2. Lecture

    3. Discussion

    April 17th

    APPLICATION ESSAY DUE

    READINGS

    1. Pfeffer, J. & Sutton, R.I. (2006). Hard Facts Dangerous Half-Truths & Total Nonsense: Profiting From Evidence-Based Management. Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Chapters 6-8.

    2. Lawler III, E.E. (2007). Why HR Practices Are Not Evidence-Based. Academy of Management Journal, 50(5), 1033-1036. [Blackboard]

    3. Rynes, S.L. (2007). Let’s Create a Tipping Point: What Academics and Practitioners Can Do, Alone and Together. Academy of Management Journal, 50(5), 1046-1054. [Blackboard]

    CLASS

    1. Application Essay Oral Reports

    2. Lecture: Essence of Decision: Cuban Missile Crisis

    3. Discussion: Barriers to EMB

    April 24th

    READINGS

    1. Weick, K.E. & Sutcliff, K.M. (2001). Managing the Unexpected. [Packet] This is a short assignment to allow you time to do the take-home final exam.

    CLASS

    1. Application Essay Oral Reports

    2. Lecture

    3. Discussion

    FINAL EXAM DUE

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Make-up work will only be given in case of documented emergencies. The University’s policies on academic dishonesty and disruption of the academic process are clearly set forth in the USF Graduate Catalog. These policies will be strictly enforced. Please be advised that punishment for academic dishonesty, including plagiarism, includes an automatic “F” (or “FF”) in the course, and action that may result in suspension or expulsion.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MS in Management (required) and MBA (elective)


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    MS in Management, MBA



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