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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - GMS6055

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-11-02
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/6/13 for MSMS Program. Approved. Cleared Syst Concurrence 7/31/13. to SCNS 8/5/13. 6055 discont 2008 - reactive or new? Pending faculty response. Appd eff 11/2/14


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    4733 2013-04-15
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Deans Office MD 6108-000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Michael J. Barber, D.Phil. 8139749908 mbarber@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    GMS 6055 Case Studies in Cancer Therapy

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Case Studies in Case Therapy
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    GMS 6053 and GMS 6054

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    This course provides an in-depth discussion of selected patient case studies in integrative oncology and is designed to assist integration of the study of the basic principles and applications of integrative oncology to patient care.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Replacing Selected Topics with Permanent number; already listed in program

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    The current Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine concentration has an enrollment of over 120 participants in the program. The current level of enrollment is anticipated to remain unchanged. This is the final course required for completion of the Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine concentration in the M.S. in Medical Sciences with a focus on cancer. The course is not part of any other programs.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 1 time

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Ph.D., M.D. or equivalent doctoral degree in the medical sciences


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The course objectives include:

    Discussing integrative therapies directed against specific cancer disorders and oncologic diseases.

    Exploring advanced clinical approaches to structural imbalances in cancer.

    Describing the use of diverse laboratory test results in integrative oncology diagnosis.

    Discussing the integration of intermediary metabolism and the treatment of diverse cancer disorders as changes in cell metabolism.

    Integrating the evaluation of a patient’s level of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients with other diagnostic test results.

    Implementing treatment plans for cancer from an integrative oncology approach.

    Exploring how to develop treatment protocols for various forms of cancer.

    Discussing innovative approaches to the clinical management of cancer patients.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    At the completion of this course, the students will be able to:

    •Identify and discuss nutrients that can prevent radiation induced diarrhea

    •Review cases showing that proteolytic enzymes can reduce adverse effects caused by radiation and chemotherapy

    •Discuss treatments for side effects of chemotherapy such as nausea, food aversions, sore mouth and throat, mouth ulcers, dry mouth, hair loss, decrease production of blood forming cells

    •Examine methods to help prevent cardiac toxicity caused by chemotherapeutic agents

    •Identify nutrients through case histories that can protect against busulfan toxicity

    •Understand how to prevent complications of chemotherapy such as leaky gut syndrome, yeast overgrowth, malabsorption, loss of digestive enzymes, and low stomach acid

    •Identify nutrients that help prevent kidney damage caused by chemotherapeutic agents

    •Understand nutrients that can be used in conjunction with radiation and chemotherapeutic agents that do not decrease the efficacy of the radiation or chemotherapy

    •Describe nutrients that help protect the nervous system

    •Recognize neurological complications of chemotherapeutic agents

    •Comprehend lymphedema treatments

    •Discuss nutrients that protect against radiation necrosis

    •Identify and discuss nutrients that can increase the effectiveness of radiation

    •Discuss integrative therapies for many forms of cancer

    •Understand the role of antioxidant use with chemotherapy and radiation

    •Discuss how to assess cancer-related infections

    •Examine how to recognize paraneoplastic syndromes

    •Discuss the treatment of hematological complications in cancer

    C. Major Topics

    Major course topics include:

    Glioblastoma

    Hyperthermia & Cancer

    Cancer Case Histories & Discussion

    Case Histories – Prostate Cancer

    Case Outcomes based on Matzinger’s Danger Model

    Finding “Danger” in Historical Best Cases

    A Case Based Illustration of Fever Therapy

    Management of Ascites

    Curative Management of Rare Malignancies

    Curative Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Curative Management of Rarely Curable Inflammatory Breast Cancers

    Cytometric Profiling in the Management of Incurable Cancer

    How to Perform a Nutrition Consultation with Cancer Patients

    D. Textbooks

    Owing to the diverse nature of the clinical subject material, no specific texts are required or available. Appropriate readings from the primary literature will be identified. Current information from cancer patients will be provided for analysis and review.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Additional and appropriate course readings will be identified and posted on Blackboard or Canvas.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Course participants are required to submit an extensive case report, or monograph, that describes an example of clinical assessments drawn from the course presentations, their own medical practice or from the primary literature and which are directly relevant to the material covered in the course and corresponds to 80% of the course grade.

    Course participants are required to attend and participate in five (5) web broadcasts that are linked to the course didactic lecture presentations and corresponds to 20% of the course grade.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Course participants are required to submit an extensive case report, or monograph, that describes an example of clinical assessments drawn from the course presentations, their own medical practice or from the primary literature and which are directly relevant to the material covered in the course and corresponds to 80% of the course grade.

    Course participants are required to attend and participate in five (5) web broadcasts that are linked to the course didactic lecture presentations and corresponds to 20% of the course grade.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    For documented student absences, such as for illness, students will be allowed to make up any missing reports. Students will be required to abide by USF policy on academic integrity described in course syllabus.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    M.S. in Medical Sciences: Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine concentration


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    None



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.