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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - MHS6066

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2013-10-11
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/6/13 - for new Child Bev Health Prog. Approved. Cleared Syst Concurrence 7/31/13. to SCNS 8/5/13. approved eff 9/1/13


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    3149 2013-04-03
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Child and Family Studies BC TPA, 583001, 10000, 000000, 0000000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Donald Kincaid 8139747684 kincaid@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    MHS 6066 Sys., Serv. and Supports for Children and Adolescents with DD

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Serv for Child& Adoles with DD
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    O - Online (100% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    NA

    Corequisites

    NA

    Course Description

    This course provides students with the tools and understanding needed to evaluate service systems for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities. Lessons address services, systems of care, and policies affecting services.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    A specific focus on Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health is in demand as evidenced by surveys with undergraduate and graduate students at USF conducted in Fall of 2012. In addition, a survey of the local community identified a specific need for a concentration that addresses the needs of children and adolescents with developmental disabilities and behavioral health needs. A review of existing courses does not show offerings similar to this course.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    In addition to a doctorate, substantial knowledge of Behavioral Health/Developmental Disabilities.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    This course will provide students with opportunities to understand:

    1. A four-step problem-solving process to address issues and gaps in systems, supports and services for families and children with developmental disabilities;

    2. How to identify and analyze issues and gaps in the systems, supports and services for children with developmental disabilities.

    3. How to identify and develop effective interventions or strategies to address issues or gaps in the systems, supports and services for children with developmental disabilities.

    4. How to manage a project effectively and efficiently including planning, implementation, delegating and sharing responsibility, staffing, and evaluation.

    5. How to identify and develop culturally responsive supports systems.

    6. How to develop proposals for funding systems, supports or services for children with developmental disabilities and their families.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Students will use the 4-step problem-solving process to:

    1. Analyze the impact of public policies on services and systems for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities and their families, discriminating those that enhance from those that lead to problems and gaps in services.

    2. Identify and evaluate issues with, and gaps in, services, systems and supports for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities.

    3. Use data (e.g., research, program evaluation) to identify effective strategies to address targeted system and service gaps for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities

    4. Understand and apply strategies to effectively and efficiently manage a project/program including planning, funding, budgeting, staffing, managing and evaluating a project to enhance systems and services for children and adolescents with developmental disabilities.

    5. Determine goals and objectives for a new or continuing program, list factors that facilitate or impede implementation, develop priorities, and establish a timeline for implementation

    C. Major Topics

    1. Overview of syllabus and problem-solving process

    2. Overview of children and family services systems and supports

    3. Policies impacting children and family services systems and supports

    4. Clarifying the goal or vision for families and children with developmental disabilities.

    5. Analysis of issues or gaps in early childhood system, supports and services.

    6. Interventions and strategies to address issues and gaps in early childhood system, supports and services.

    7. Analysis of issues or gaps in education system, supports and services.

    8. Intervention and strategies to address issues or gaps in education system, supports and services.

    9. Analysis of issues or gaps in transition system, supports and services.

    10. Intervention and strategies to address issues or gaps in transition systems, supports and services.

    11. Analysis of issues or gaps in community inclusion of families and individuals with developmental disabilities in systems, supports and services.

    12. Intervention and strategies to address issues or gaps in community inclusion of families and individuals with developmental disabilities in systems, supports and services.

    13. Culturally responsive practices; begin work on grant application

    14. Informal review and feedback of grant project

    15. Informal review and feedback of grant project

    D. Textbooks

    Course readings include journal articles and chapters in the syllabus assignment list. There is no single textbook that was found to address current policies and effective service delivery in developmental disabilities.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Available at:https://usf.adobeconnect.com/dbps

    Module 1: Interpersonal Communication Skills: (currently available)

    Module 2: 8-Step Problem Solving Process

    Module 3: Giving and Receiving Feedback

    Module 4: Video of 8-step problem-solving

    Florida’s Agency for Persons with Disabilities: http://apd.myflorida.com/

    Florida’s Developmental Disabilities Council: http://www.fddc.org/places-to-find-help

    The Florida Center for Inclusive Communities: http://flfcic.fmhi.usf.edu/

    Mailman Center for Child Development: http://pediatrics.med.miami.edu/mailman-center

    Disability Right Florida:http://www.disabilityrightsflorida.org/

    Florida Bureau of Exceptional Education and Student Services: http://www.fldoe.org/ese/

    DD Act overview: http://www.md-council.org/about/dd_act.html

    Rising Expectations: The Developmental Disabilities Act Revisited

    http://www.ncd.gov/publications/2011/Feb142011

    Annual state of state report:

    http://sos.arielmis.net/documents/SOS%20FINAL%20REVISED%20EDITION2011.pdf

    State of the States site: http://www.stateofthestates.org/

    IDEA legislation. K-12 impact. Available online at: http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode20/usc_sup_01_20_10_33.html

    IDEA legislation. Early childhood impact. Available online at: http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode20/usc_sup_01_20_10_33.html

    The Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 (PL 101-336). http://www.dol.gov/oasam/programs/crc/

    Florida funding: http://www.flddresources.org/

    Walker, P., Hewitt, A., Bogenchutz, M., & Hall-Lande, J. (2009). Implementation of Consumer-Directed Services for Persons With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A National Study. Research and Training Center on Community Living, Institute on Community Integration (UCEDD), College of Education and Human Development, University of Minnesota Policy Research Brief, (20)1.

    Rizzolo, M., Hemp, R., Braddock, D., Schindler, A. (2009). Family Support Services in the United States: 2008. Research and Training Center at the Institute on Community Integration.

    Website for Advocating Change Together. Available online at:

    http://www.selfadvocacy.com

    Website for Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered. Available online at:

    http://www.sabeusa.org .

    Website for Self-Advocacy Online. Available at: http://www.selfadvocacyonline.org http://www.theriotrocks.org

    Integration. Policy Research Brief, 20(2).

    Mouth. An online magazine edited by people with physical disabilities. Available online at: http://www.mouthmag.com.

    The Riot! An online magazine edited by people with developmental disabilities. Available at: http://www.theriotrocks.org

    Pacer center website on self determination:

    http://www.pacer.org/tatra/resources/self.asp

    http://www.aucd.org/docs/SD-WhatDoWeKnow.pdf

    Early Childhood Development and Disability: A discussion paper

    http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/75355/1/9789241504065_eng.pdf

    Position statement: http://aaidd.org/content_146.cfm?navID=31

    http://suite101.com/article/advantages-of-early-intervention-a45296

    http://qrisnetwork.org/resource/2010/toward-identification-features-effective-professional-development-early-childhood-educ

    http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/index.php (provided as a resource through AUCD)

    http://www.issues.org/26.1/shonkoff.html This article talks about policy and suggests closing the gap through scientific evidence-based practices.

    IDEA legislation. K-12 impact. Available online at: http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/html/uscode20/usc_sup_01_20_10_33.html

    Ryndak, D. L., Jackson, L., & Billingsley, F. (2000). Defining School Inclusion for Students With Moderate to Severe Disabilities: What Do Experts Say?. Exceptionality, 8(2), 101-116.

    Laluvein, J. (2010). School inclusion and the ‘community of practice’. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 14(1), 35-48.

    U.S. Department of Education. (2010). Summary of Seclusion and Restraint Statutes, Regulations, Policies, and Guidance, by State and Territory: Information as Reported to the Regional Comprehensive Centers and Gathered From Other Sources. Washington, D.C.

    NAMI position statement on aversive procedures: http://www.nami.org/Content/ContentGroups/Policy/Issues_Spotlights/NAMIs_Position_on_Seclusion_and_Restraints.htm

    Twelve barriers to effective behavior support, Iovannone and Kincaid draft paper

    Preparing General Education Teachers to Improve Outcomes for Students with Disabilities: http://aacte.org/research-policy/recent-reports-on-educator-preparation/preparing-general-education-teachers-to-improve-outcomes-for-students-with-disabilities.html

    National Alliance for Secondary Education and Transition. (2005). National standards and quality indicators: Transition toolkit for systems improvement. Minneapolis:

    University of Minnesota, National Center on Secondary Education and Transition. Available online at: http://www.nasetalliance.org/docs/TransitionToolkit.pdf

    Gaylord, V., Johnson, D.R., Lehr, C.A., Bremer, C.D. & Hasazi, S. (Eds.). (2004). Impact: Feature Issue on Achieving Secondary Education and Transition Results for Students with Disabilities, 16(3). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Institute on Community Integration. Available online at: http://ici.umn.edu/products/impact/163.

    http://www.transition2012.org/ National Transition Conference Resources. I clicked on Program Policy/Partnerships in Employment – Transition Systems Change. It provides powerpoints from all the presenters (6 states – not Florida – and the Employment TA center

    Project 10 website: http://www.project10.info/Taxonomy.php

    National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center. (2010, October). Cross-referencing the Taxonomy for Transition Programming with the NASET National Standards and Quality Indicators and the [NCWD/Youth] Guideposts for Success for Transition-Age Youth. Charlotte, NC: University of North Carolina Charlotte. Available at http://www.nsttac.org/sites/default/files/assets/pdf/pdf/capacity_building/CrosswalkTaxonomy.pdf

    O’Brien, C. L., and O’Brien, J. (2000). The Origins of Person Centered Planning: A Community of Practice Perspective. Responsive Systems Associates, Inc. Available online at: http://thechp.syr.edu/rsapub.htm (Click on: “The Origins of Person Centered Planning: A Community of Practice Perspective”)

    Person-Centered Planning Education site at Cornell University. http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/edi/pcp/index.html

    Kincaid, D. & Fox, L. (2002). Person-centered planning and positive behavior support. In S.

    Holburn & Vietze, P. (Eds.), Research and practice in person-centered planning. Baltimore: Paul

    H. Brookes, 29-50.

    O'Brien, J. June, 2006 Reflecting on Social Roles: Identifying Opportunities to Support Personal Freedom & Social Integration http://rtc.umn.edu/docs/SocialRoleInventory.pdf

    Florida’s Problem Solving and Response to Intervention Project:

    http://www.floridarti.usf.edu/index.html

    Florida’s Positive Behavior Support Project: http://flpbs.fmhi.usf.edu/

    Universal Design for Learning: http://www.udlcenter.org/

    School inclusion and multicultural issues in special education:

    http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=e1ITbOA2jhQC&oi=fnd&pg=PA343&dq=school+inclusion+&ots=8xj2NtKVL4&sig=PzfjtZFt8KUEIUlr7xphi8ZwVN8#v=onepage&q=school%20inclusion&f=false

    http://extension.oregonstate.edu/metro4h/sites/default/files/how_to_be_cultural__responsiveness_.pdf

    www.cehd.umn.edu/ppg/partnerships/ccresources/gay.pdf

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    A+ 194 to 200

    A 186 to 193

    A- 180 to 185

    B+ 174 to 179

    B 166 to 173

    B- 160 to 165

    C+ 154 to 159

    C 146 to 153

    C- 140 to 145

    D+ 134 to 139

    D 126 to 133

    D- 120 to 125

    F 119 and lower

    Your grade will be based on the following:

    Resource sharing 15%

    Weekly writing assignment 37.5%

    Final grant proposal 32.5%

    Class Participation 15%

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    There will be no exams or quizzes in the course.

    It is important to realize that an on-line course requires the same amount of time as a course taken on campus. It is typically advised that a course should have 45 hours of work for each credit hour. This means that this coursework should take 13.5 hours of your time each week. Of course, the actual amount of time will vary depending on your learning style, previous knowledge, and the complexity of the topic.

    Assignments:

    1. Contributions to the shared file of resources (0-2 pts. per 15 classes, maximum of 30 points) 15%:

    Students will be required to submit 2 or more quality resources to the instructor each week for collection in a resource guide provided to all students at the end of class. The instructor will evaluate each submission and assign a “0” or “1” score to each item submitted. Materials may consist of documents, papers, websites, etc. that can be copied and stored. The contributions to the shared file are due to the instructor by Saturday at 11:59 PM US EST on the week that the module is scheduled for completion.

    2. Weekly written assignments (0-5 pts. per 15 classes, maximum of 75 total points) 37.5%:

    Students will be required to submit a two-page single spaced paper each week of the course. In weeks 1-12, students will produce a response paper related to a) their assigned readings, b) additional resources they have found related to the topic, or 3) responses to the questions posed or discussed on the discussion board. For weeks 13through 15, students will submit drafts of their proposed project/grant, questions related to their project, or responses to new materials related to their area of interest. The weekly written assignment is due Saturday at 11:59 PM US EST on the week that the module is scheduled for completion. All written assignments must be submitted via the Canvas system and NOT sent directly to my USF email account. If you click on the assignment link for the week, you can type in or copy and paste your assignment into the system.

    3. Grant application practice (65 pts.) 32.5%:

    Students must identify one area related to systems, services and supports in developmental disabilities and prepare a grant application according to the guidelines of a funding source (IES, NIH, OSEP, etc.). The narrative and a proposed budget for the grant must be provided as the final project. The Application Proposal is due the last week of class by 10:00 AM US EST on __________. This proposal must be submitted via the Canvas system and not sent directly to my USF email account. If you click on the link for the proposal in the assignment section, you can attach a file or copy and paste your proposal into the system.

    4. Credit for Class Participation (0-2 points per 15 weeks, maximum of 30 pts.) 15%:

    Credit for participation is awarded by the instructor based on a holistic judgment of the following:

    - Remaining up-to-date with required weekly activities;

    - Submitting at least one discussion question via the discussion board related to the material (readings, resources, other student’s questions, etc.) each week.

    - Responding to discussion threads begun by the students or other students.

    - All questions and responses must be completed by the Saturday at 11:59 PM US EST on the week that the module is scheduled for completion.

    - Questions and responses submitted before or after the scheduled week will not be credited.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Canvas, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Canvas site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    If you are unable to complete an assignment on time, you should notify the instructors as soon as possible. You must contact the instructor 24 hours before an assignment is due. Depending upon the circumstances, an extension may be granted. Disruption of the academic process and violations of the policies regarding academic integrity will not be tolerated.

    http://generalcounsel.usf.edu/regulations/pdfs/regulation-usf6.0021.pdf

    Review USF policies on Academic Integrity of Students at:

    http://www.grad.usf.edu/policies_Sect7_full.php.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Master of Science in Child and Adolescent Behavior Health


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.