Apply to USF Now | Graduate Admissions | Events & Workshops | Giving to the Office of Graduate Studies

Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - MHS6069

Edit function not enabled for this course.


Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-10-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/6/13; pending revision desc - too long. Faculty emailed 5/10/13. fixed. To chair. GC apprd 8/5/13. to USF Sys. To SCNS 8/23/13. MHS 6074 apprd as MHS 6069 Effective 10/1/14


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    3148 2013-04-02
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Child and Family Studies BC TPA, 583001, 10000, 00000, 000000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Carol MacKinnon-Lewis 8139742075 lewiscm@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    MHS 6069 Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Child & Adolescent Behavioral
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 100

    Prerequisites

    NA

    Corequisites

    NA

    Course Description

    Provides an introduction to a variety of topics relevant to child and adolescent behavioral health, including its history, settings for service provision, and various factors that shape best practice approaches to meet the needs of youth and families.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    A specific focus on Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health is in demand as evidenced by surveys with undergraduate and graduate students at USF conducted in Fall of 2012. A review of existing courses does not show offerings similar to this course.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    In addition to a Doctoral Degree, substantial knowledge of child and adolescent behavioral Health/Developmental Disabilities


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Provide an overview of the historical and environmental conditions pertinent to child and

    adolescent behavioral health.

    2. Present the epidemiology of child and adolescent behavioral health and how it informs service development and practice.

    3. Provide a theoretical framework for the factors that shape child and adolescent development and the onset of behavioral health problems.

    4. Discuss the evidence base for best practice approaches for children and adolescents with behavioral health issues and their families.

    5. Present ethical issues in the design and delivery of child and adolescent behavioral health services.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1. Understand the historical underpinnings of the behavioral health field, and children’s behavioral health services specifically, including key issues around financing, policy, and access to services.

    2. Specify the epidemiology of behavioral health issues, and the application of epidemiological research to inform behavioral health service development and practice.

    3. Describe various contexts for behavioral health service delivery and the diversity of populations served, including the implications of culture, race, ethnicity, and other demographic factors for service delivery.

    4. Identify ethical issues involved in the delivery of child and adolescent behavioral health services.

    5. Apply evidence-based and best practice principles related to the assessment, treatment planning, and coordination of child/adolescent behavioral health services, including case management skills, working in interdisciplinary teams, and working with families.

    C. Major Topics

    1. Historical underpinnings of the behavioral health field

    2. Epidemiology & Co-Occurring Disorders

    3. Contexts for delivery of behavioral health services

    4. Person-in-environment framework

    5. Pschopathology

    6. Assessment, Traetment Planning, Coordination

    7. Working with Families

    8. Mental health issues

    9. Substance Use Issues

    10. Developmental disabilities

    11. Case Management Skills, Interdisciplinary Teams, & Interagency Collaboration

    12. Cultural and other Demographic issues

    13. Prevention, Resiliency and recovery-oriented treatment

    14. Consumer/Advocacy Issues/Application of ethics/values in the delivery of services

    15. Translation of Research into Practice/Measurement of Program Outcomes

    D. Textbooks

    Course readings include articles and book chapters listed in assignments; readings are not located in a single textbook.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Libby, R., & Comm Child Hlth Financing. (2010). Policy statement-principles of health care financing. Pediatrics, 126(5), pg. 1018-1021.

    Lightburn, a. & Sessions, P. (2010). Chapter 15: Pathways to Reforming Children’s Mental Health Service Systems. In Handbook of Community Based Clinical Practice. Oxford University Press.

    Petrila, J. & Levin, B. L. (2010). Chapter 3: Law, Services Delivery, and Policy. In Mental Health Services: A Public Health Perspective. Levin, B. L., Hennessy, K. D., & Petrila, J. (eds.) New York: Oxford University Press. Pg. 43-66.

    Roberts, M. C. & James, R. L. (2008). Chapter 2: Empirically Supported Treatments and Evidence-Based Practice for Children and Adolescents. In Handbook of Evidence-Based Therapies for Children and Adolescents: Bridging Science and Practice. Steele, R. G., Elkin, T. D., & Roberts, M. C. (eds.) New York: Springer Press. 9-24.

    Russ, S., Garro, N., & Halfon, N. (2010). Meeting children's basic health needs: From patchwork to tapestry. Children and Youth Services Review, 32(9), 1149-1164.

    Sterling, S., Weisner, C., Hinman, A., & Parthasarathy, S. (2010). Access to treatment for adolescents with substance use and co-occurring disorders: Challenges and opportunities. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 49(7), 637-646.

    Bernard, S. H. (2009). Mental health and behavioral problems in children and adolescents with learning disabilities. Psychiatry, 8(10), pg. 387-390.

    Blackman, J. A., Gurka, M. J., Gurka, K. K., & Oliver, M. N. (2011) Emotional, developmental, and behavioural co-morbidities of children with chronic health conditions. Journal of Pediatrics and Child Health, 47, pg. 742-747.

    Costello, E. J., Egger, H., & Angold, A. (2005) 10-Year Research Update Review: The Epidemiology of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Disorders: I. Methods and Public Health Burden. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 44(10), pg. 972-986.

    Ford, T. (2008). Practitioner Review: How Can Epidemiology Help Us Plan and Deliver Effective Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49(9), pg. 900-914.

    O’Connell, M. E., Boat, T., & Warner, K. E. (2009). Chapter 2: Nature and the Extent of the Problem. In Preventing Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People: Progress and Possibilities. National Academies Press. Pg. 35-58.

    Callejas, L. M., Hernandez, M., Nesman, T., Mowery, D. (2010). Creating a front porch in systems of care: Improving access to behavioral health services for diverse children and families. Evaluation and Program Planning, 33, pg. 32-35.

    Cook, J. R., & Kilmer, R. P. (2012). Systems of care: New partnerships for community psychology. American Journal of Community Psychology, 49(3-4), 393-403.

    Hodges, S., Ferreira, K., Israel, N., & Mazza, J. (2010). Systems of Care, Featherless Bipeds, and the Measure of All Things. Evaluation and Program Planning, 33, pg. 4-10.

    Kolko, D. J., Herschell, A. D., Costello, A. H., Kolko, R. P. (2009). Child Welfare Recommendations to Improve Mental Health Services for Children who have Experienced Abuse and Neglect: A National Perspective. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 36, pg. 50-62.

    Lightburn, A. & Sessions, P. (2010). Chapter 1: What is Community Based Clinical Practice? In Handbook of Community Based Clinical Practice. Oxford University Press. Online Access.

    O’Connell, M. E., Boat, T., & Warner, K. E. (2009). Chapter 6: Family, School, and Community Interventions. In Preventing Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People: Progress and Possibilities. National Academies Press. Pg. 157-190.

    Reback, R. (2010). Schools' mental health services and young children's emotions, behavior, and learning. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, 29(4), 698-U64.

    Antonishak, J. & Reppucci, N. D. (2008). Chapter 4: Ecological and Community Level Influences on Child Development. In Handbook of Childhood Behavioral Issues: Evidence-Based Approaches to Prevention and Treatment. Ramos, J. M., Blau, G. M., & Gullotta, T. P. (eds.) Pg. 69-86.

    Bush, K. R., & Peterson, G. W. (2008). Chapter 3: Family Influences on Child Development. In Handbook of Childhood Behavioral Issues: Evidence-Based Approaches to Prevention and Treatment. Ramos, J. M., Blau, G. M., & Gullotta, T. P. (eds.) Pg. 43-68.

    De Voursney, D., Mannix, D., Brounstein, P. J., & Blau, G. M. (2008). Chapter 2: Childhood Growth and Development. In Handbook of Childhood Behavioral Issues: Evidence-Based Approaches to Prevention and Treatment. Ramos, J. M., Blau, G. M., & Gullotta, T. P. (eds.) Pg. 19-39.

    Heflinger, C. A. & Christens, B. (2006). Rural Behavioral Health Services for Children and Adolescents: An Ecological and Community Psychology Analysis. Journal of Community Psychology, 34(4), pg. 379-400.

    Costello, E. J., Copeland, W., & Angold, A. (2011). Trends in Psychopathology Across the Adolescent Years: What Changes When Children Become Adolescents, and When Adolescents Become Adults? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 52(10), pg. 1051-1025.

    da Silva, D. R., Rijo, D., & Salekin, R. T. (2012). Child and adolescent psychopathy: A state-of-the-art reflection on the construct and etiological theories. Journal of Criminal Justice, 40(4), 269-277.

    Jewell, J. D., Hupp, S. D. A., Pomerantz, A. M. (2009). Chapter 2: Diagnostic Classification Systems. In Assessing Childhood Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities. Matson, J. L., Andrasik, F., & Matson, M. L. (eds.) New York: Springer Science. Pg. 31-53.

    Wilkins, J. & Matson, J. L. (2009). Chapter 1: History of Treatment in Children with Developmental Disabilities and Psychopathology. In Treating Childhood Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities. Matson, J. L., Andrasik, F., & Matson, M. L. (eds.) New York: Springer. Pg. 3-28.

    Bruns, E. J., Walker, J. S., Zabel, M., Matarese, M., Estep, K., Harburger, D., Mosby, M., Pires, S. A. (2010). Intervening in the lives of youth with complex behavioral health challenges and their families: The role of the wraparound process. American Journal of Community Psychology, 46, pg. 314-331.

    Cox, K. F. (2006). Investigating the Impact of Strength-Based Assessment on Youth with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 15(3), pg. 287-301.

    McCammon, S. L. (2012). Systems of Care as Asset-Building Communities: Implementing Strengths-Based Planning and Positive Youth Development. American Journal of Community Psychology, 49, pg. 556-565.

    Phares, V. & Curley, J. (2008) Evidence-Based Assessment for Children and Adolescents. . In Handbook of Evidence-Based Therapies for Children and Adolescents: Bridging Science and Practice. Steele, R. G., Elkin, T. D., & Roberts, M. C. (eds.) New York: Springer Press.

    Winters, N. C. & Metz, W. P. (2009). Psychiatric Clinics of North America. doi: 10.1016/j.psc.2008.11.007.

    Allen, R. I., & Petr, C. G. (1998). Rethinking Family Centered Practice. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 68(1), pg. 4-15.

    Baxter, B. (2010). For Families, Actions Speak Louder than Words. Evaluation and Program Planning, 33, pg. 39-40.

    Kilmer, R. P., Cook, J. R., & Munsell, E. P. (2010) Moving from Principles to Practice: Recommended Policy Changes to Promote Family-Centered Care. American Journal of Community Psychology, 46, pg. 332-341.

    Lightburn, A. & Sessions, P. (2010). Chapter 26: Creating a Community of Care for Seriously Emotionally Distressed Youth. In Handbook of Community Based Clinical Practice. Oxford University Press. Online Access.

    Slaton, A. E., Cecil, C. W., Lambert, L. E., King, T., & Pearson, M. M. (2012). What a Difference Family-Driven Makes: Stories of Success and Lessons Learned. American Journal of Community Psychology, 49, pg. 538-545.

    Dogra, N., Parkin, A., Gale, F., Frake, C. (2009). Chapter 8: Emotional Problems. In A Multidisciplinary Handbook of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Second Edition. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Pg. 127-142.

    Dogra, N., Parkin, A., Gale, F., Frake, C. (2009). Chapter 9: Behavioural Problems. In A Multidisciplinary Handbook of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Second Edition. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Pg. 143-160.

    Dogra, N., Parkin, A., Gale, F., Frake, C. (2009). Chapter 12: Major Mental Health Disorders. In A Multidisciplinary Handbook of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Second Edition. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Pg. 181-209.

    Steele, R. G. & Roberts, M. C. (2005). Chapter 1: Mental Health Services for Children, Adolescents, and their Families: Trends, Models, & Current Status. In The Handbook of Mental Health Services for Children, Adolescents, and Families. Steele, R. G. & Roberts, M. C. (eds.) Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers. Pg. 1-14.

    von Polier, G. G., Vloet, T. D., & Herpertz-Dahlmann, B. (2012). ADHD and delinquency - a developmental perspective. Behavioral Sciences & the Law, 30(2), 121-139.

    Walker, S. (2010). Chapter 3: Mental Health Problems. In The Social Worker’s Guide to Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Pg. 69-102.

    D'Amico, E. J., Tucker, J. S., Miles, J. N. V., Zhou, A. J., Shih, R. A., & Green, H. D., Jr. (2012). Preventing alcohol use with a voluntary after-school program for middle school students: Results from a cluster randomized controlled trial of CHOICE. Prevention Science, 13(4), 415-425.

    Griffin, K. W. & Botvin, G. J. (2010). Evidence-based interventions for preventing substance use disorders in adolescents. Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 19(3), pg. 505-526.

    Harris, N., Brazeau, J. N., Clarkson, A., Brownlee, K., & Rawana, E. P. (2012). Adolescents’ Experiences of a Strengths-Based Treatment Program for Substance Abuse. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 44(5), pg. 390-397.

    Pringle, B. & Flanzer, J. (2005). Chapter 12: Treatment Services for Adolescent Substance Abuse. In The Handbook of Mental Health Services for Children, Adolescents, and Families. Steele, R. G. & Roberts, M. C. (eds.) Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers. pg. 181-200.

    Tarter, R. E. (2002). Etiology of Adolescent Substance Abuse: A Developmental Perspective. American Journal on Addictions, 11, pg. 171-191.

    Tucker, J. S., Pollard, M. S., de la Haye, K., Kennedy, D. P., & Green, H. D., Jr. (2013). Neighborhood characteristics and the initiation of marijuana use and binge drinking. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 128(1-2), 83-89.

    Boyle, C. A., Boulet, S., Schieve, L. A., Cohen, R. A., Blumberg, S. J., Yeargin-Allsopp, M., Visser, S., & Kogan, M. D. (2011). Trends in the prevalence of developmental disabilities in US children, 1997-2008. Pediatrics, 127(6), pg. 1034-1042.

    Chiri, G. & Warfield, M. E. (2012). Unmet need and problems accessing core health care services for children with autism spectrum disorder. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 16(5), pg. 1081-1091.

    Dogra, N., Parkin, A., Gale, F., Frake, C. (2009). Chapter 11: Learning Disabilities and Developmental Disorders. In A Multidisciplinary Handbook of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Second Edition. Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Pg. 169-180.

    Houtrow, A. J., Okumura, M. J., Hilton, J. F., & Rehm, R. S. (2011). Profiling health and health-related services for children with special health care needs with and without disabilities. Academic Pediatrics, 11(6), 508-516.

    Mandell, D. S., Stahmer, A. C., & Brodkin, E. S. (2008) Chapter 16: Autism Spectrum Discorders in Childhood. In Handbook of Childhood Behavioral Issues: Evidence-Based Approaches to Prevention and Treatment. Ramos, J. M., Blau, G. M., & Gullotta, T. P. (eds.) Pg. 345-369.

    Chuang, E., & Wells, R. (2010). The role of inter-agency collaboration in facilitating receipt of behavioral health services for youth involved with child welfare and juvenile justice. Children and Youth Services Review, 32(12), 1814-1822.

    Pidano, A. E., Marcaly, K. H., Ihde, K. M., Kurowski, E. C., & Whitcomb, J. M. (2011). Connecticut's enhanced care clinic initiative: Early returns from pediatric-behavioral health partnerships. Families Systems & Health, 29(2), 138-143.

    Walker, S. (2010). Chapter 4: Social Work Skills and Methods. In The Social Worker’s Guide to Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Pg. 105-134.

    Walker, S. (2010). Chapter 5: Multi-disciplinary and Interprofessional Working. In The Social Worker’s Guide to Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Pg. 135-157.

    Alegria, M., Vallas, M., & Pumariega, A. (2010). Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Pediatric Mental Health. Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 19(4), 759-774.

    Cross, T., Bartgis, J., & Fox, K. (2010). Rethinking the Systems of Care Definition: An Indigenous Perspective. Evaluation and Program Planning, 33, pg. 28-31.

    Walker, S. (2010). Chapter 8: Culture, Ethnicity, and Diversity. In The Social Worker’s Guide to Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Pg. 205-229.

    Yoshikawa, H., Aber, J. L., Beardslee, W. R. (2012). The effects of poverty on the Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Health of Children and Youth: Implications for Prevention. American Psychologist, 67(4), pg. 272-284.

    Bloom, M. (2008). Chapter 6: Principles and Approaches to Primary Prevention. In Handbook of Childhood Behavioral Issues: Evidence-Based Approaches to Prevention and Treatment. Ramos, J. M., Blau, G. M., & Gullotta, T. P. (eds.) Pg. 107-122.

    Holden, E. W. & Holden, E. A. (2008). Chapter 5: The evidence base for treating children’s mental health disorders. In Handbook of Childhood Behavioral Issues: Evidence-Based Approaches to Prevention and Treatment. Ramos, J. M., Blau, G. M., & Gullotta, T. P. (eds.) Pg. 87-105.

    Leve, L. D., Harold, G. T., Chamberlain, P., Landsverk, J. A., Fisher, P. A., & Vostanis, P. (2012). Practitioner review: Children in foster care - vulnerabilities and evidence-based interventions that promote resilience processes. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 53(12), 1197-1211.

    Madrid, P. A. (2011). Resilience Challenged: Thoughts on Children’s Mental Health in the Gulf Coast 5 Years After Katrina. American Academy of Pediatrics. www.pediatrics.org/cgidoi/10.1542/peds.2010-3724K

    O’Connell, M. E., Boat, T., & Warner, K. E. (2009). Chapter 4: Using a Developmental Framework to Guide Prevention and Promotion. In Preventing Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People: Progress and Possibilities. National Academies Press.

    Sowers, W. E. (2012). Recovery and Person-Centered Care: Empowerment, Collaboration and Integration. In Handbook of Community Psychiatry. McQuistion, H. L., et al. (eds.) Springer Science. Pg. 79-89.

    Celano, M. (2012). The Ethics of Working with Families: A Behavioral Health Workforce Perspective. Research and Practice, 43(4), pg. 325-327.

    Davis, T. S., Scheer, S. D., Gavazzi, S. M., Uppal, R. (2010). Parent Advocates in Children’s Mental Health: Program Implementation Processes and Considerations. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 37, pg. 468-483.

    Heflinger, C. A. & Hinshaw, S. P. (2010) Stigma in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services Research: Undertsanding Professional and Institutional Stigmatization of Youth with Mental Health Problems and Their Families. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 37, 61-70.

    Olin, S. S., Hoagwood, K. E., Rodriguez, J., Ramos, B., Burton, G., Penn, M., Crowe, M., Radigan, M., & Jensen, P. S. (2010). The Application of Behavior Change Theory to Family-Based Services: Improving Parent Empowerment in Children’s Mental Health. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 19, pg. 462-470.

    Rae, W. A. & Fournier, C. J. (2008). Evidence-based Therapy and Ethical Practice. In Handbook of Evidence-Based Therapies for Children and Adolescents: Bridging Science and Practice. Steele, R. G., Elkin, T. D., & Roberts, M. C. (eds.) New York: Springer Press. Pg. 505-519.

    Williams, R. & Hazell, P. (2009). Implementing Guidance and Guidelines for Developing and Delivering Equitable Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 22(4), pg. 339-344.

    Garland, A. F., Haine-Schlagel, R., Brookman-Frazee, L., Baker-Ericzen, M., Trask, E., & Fawley-King, K. (2013). Improving community-based mental health care for children: Translating knowledge into action. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 40(1), 6-22.

    Garland, A. F., Bickman, L., & Chorpita, B. F. (2010). Change What? Identifying Quality Improvement Targets by Investigating Usual Mental Health Care. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 37, pg. 15-26.

    Riemer, M., Athany, M. M., Bickman, L., Breda, C., Kelley, S. D., Vides de Andrade, A. R. (2012). The Peabody Treatment Progress Battery: History and Methods for Developing a Comprehensive Measurement Battery for Youth Mental Health. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 39, pg. 3-12.

    Roberts, M. C. & Steele, R. G. (2005). Chapter 23: Program Evaluation Approaches to Service Delivery in Child and Family Mental Health. In The Handbook of Mental Health Services for Children, Adolescents, and Families. Steele, R. G. & Roberts, M. C. (eds.) Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers. Pg. 351-369.

    Smith-Boydston, J. M. & Nelson, T. D. (2008). Adoption of Evidence-Based Treatments in Community Settings: Obstacles and Opportunities. In Handbook of Evidence-Based Therapies for Children and Adolescents: Bridging Science and Practice. Steele, R. G., Elkin, T. D., & Roberts, M. C. (eds.) New York: Springer Press. Pg. 521-535.

    Southam-Gerow, M. A., Rodriguez, A., Chorpita, B. F., & Daleiden, E. L. (2012). Dissemination and implementation of evidence based treatments for youth: Challenges and recommendations. Professional Psychology-Research and Practice, 43(5), 527-534.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Grading Rubric for Class Participation (25 points):

    Regular attendance and participation is essential. Students are expected to show up on time and come prepared to participate in class discussions. You are expected to contribute ideas, comments, and discuss issues raised each week by the instructor or other students. If you are unable to make a class, you must notify the instructor in advance. More than one unexcused absence will result in a lower grade by one level, and more than 2 absences will result in an F or I for the course. .

    Grading Rubric for Mid-Term and Final Exams (50 points each):

    Work will be judged by clarity of expression and the degree to which you demonstrate an understanding of the course material. Your points should be well-documented. You should use citations, where appropriate. References must accompany citations and both must be in American Psychological Association (APA) style format.

    Depth and quality of responses – 25 points

    Organization, clarity of writing, documentation – 15points

    APA style format /writing style/grammar – 10 points

    Grading Rubric for Final Paper (50 points):

    Work will be judged by clarity of expression and the degree to which you demonstrate an understanding of the topic. Your paper should be well-organized and points should be documented.. You should use citations, where appropriate. References must accompany citations and both must be in American Psychological Association (APA) style format.

    Depth and quality of content – 25 points

    Organization, clarity of writing, documentation – 15points

    APA style format /writing style/grammar – 10 points

    Grading Rubric for Presentation (25 points):

    Understanding of topic (in presentation/response to questions) – 15 points

    Quality and style of presentation – 10 points

    Grading Scale:

    94-100%=A

    90-93% = A-

    87-89% = B+

    84-86% = B

    80-83% = B-

    77-79% = C+

    74-76% = C

    70-73% = C-

    67-69% = D+

    64-66% = D

    60-63% = D-

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Week 1: Historical underpinnings of the behavioral health field

    • Behavioral health law and policy

    • Financing structure

    • Overview of the evidence-based movement

    • Access to services

    Week 2: Epidemiology & Co-Occurring Disorders

    • What is epidemiology?

    • Applying epidemiology to child/adolescent behavioral health

    • Co-occurrence of behavioral and physical health conditions

    Week 3: Contexts for delivery of behavioral health services

    • Community-based care

    • Systems of Care

    • Family and School Contexts

    • Special populations (e.g. child welfare, juvenile justice)

    Week 4: Person-in-environment framework

    • Child growth and development in socio-ecological context

    • Understanding biological, psychological and social factors

    Week 5: Psychopathology

    • Overview of prevalence of behavioral health disorders

    • Diagnostic criteria

    • Historical review of treatment approaches

    Week 6: Assessment, Treatment Planning, Coordination

    • Evidence-based and strengths-based assessment

    • Wraparound process/approach

    Week 7: Working with Families

    • Historical overview of family-centered care

    • Core concepts and philosophies of family-driven care

    • Impact on effectiveness and sustainability of service systems

    Week 8: Mental health issues

    *Mid-term Exam Due -

    • Overview of trends and models in mental health services for children and adolescents

    • Common emotional, behavioral, and mental health problems in children/adolescents

    • Role of social workers in addressing child/adolescent mental health needs

    LAST DAY TO DROP WITH A “W,” NO REFUND AND NO ACADEMIC PENALTY: Insert Date

    Week 9: Substance Use Issues

    • Etiology of substance abuse in children/adolescents

    • Treatment services to address adolescent substance use issues

    • Evidence-based approaches to treatment and prevention of substance abuse

    Week 10: Developmental disabilities

    • Overview of developmental disorders and learning disabilities affecting children

    • Trends in prevalence and treatment

    • Addressing unmet needs of children with developmental disabilities

    Week 11: Case Management Skills, Interdisciplinary Teams, & Interagency Collaboration

    • Case management skills and methods in child/adolescent behavioral health

    • Working in a multi-disciplinary teams

    • Collaboration with external system partners

    Week 12: Cultural and other Demographic Issues – age, race, ethnicity, etc.

    • Impact of culture, race/ethnicity, and other demographic factors on mental/behavioral health and access to services

    • Culturally-competent practice and service delivery

    Week 13: Prevention, Resiliency and recovery-oriented treatment

    • Application of developmental framework to prevention

    • Evidence-based treatment approaches

    • Understanding the concepts of resiliency and recovery in the treatment of mental and behavioral health problems

    Week 14: Consumer/Advocacy Issues/Application of ethics/values in the delivery of services

    *Final Paper DUE

    *Class Presentations of Final Paper

    • Role of consumer advocacy in shaping/improving services

    • Ethical issues in treatment, service delivery, and working with children/families

    Week 15: Translation of Research into Practice/ Measurement of Program Outcomes

    *Final Exam

    *Class Presentations of Final Paper

    • Strategies for translating research into practice

    • Issues associated with translational research

    H. Attendance Policy

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Canvas, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Canvas site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    For absence due to medical reasons (yours or your immediate family's) on a test day or a day that an assignment is due, please provide a physician's note and notify to the instructor prior to class. In this event the student must work with the instructor to arrange a time to complete the assignment within an agreed upon time frame. For unexcused missing assignments the student will lose 10 pts each week. Please review USF policies on Academic Integrity of Students at: http://www.grad.usf.edu/policies_Sect7_full.php.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Master of Science in Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.