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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - MHS6068

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2013-10-24
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/6/13 - for new Child Bev Health Prog. Approved. Cleared Syst Concurrence 7/31/13. to SCNS 8/5/13. Nmbr 6093 apprd as 6068 eff 9/1/13


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    3147 2013-04-01
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Child and Family Studies BC TPA,583001, 10000, 000000, 0000000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Teresa M. Nesman 8139742763 nesman@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    MHS 6068 Community-Based Beh Health Interven for Cult Diverse Youth

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Comm Based BH Inter Div Youth
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    O - Online (100% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    NA

    Corequisites

    NA

    Course Description

    This course focuses on behavioral health issues and interventions for culturally diverse youth. Topics include youth and family strengths and needs, research and intervention approaches, and relevant policies at global, national, and local levels.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    A specific focus on Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health is in demand as evidenced by surveys with undergraduate and graduate students at USF conducted in Fall of 2012. A review of existing courses does not show offerings similar to this course. It would also service graduate programs in Social Work, Public Health, Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling, and Education.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    In addition to a doctoral degree, substantial knowledge of Behavioral Health/Development Disabilities is required.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Discuss the role of culture in behavioral health issues and interventions for culturally diverse youth, including individual, family, societal, and service system characteristics.

    2. Explore the role of race, ethnicity, language, acculturation, immigration, and cross-cultural interactions in the healthy development of diverse youth.

    3. Demonstrate the importance of cultural competence in developing, implementing, and evaluating the effectiveness of behavioral health interventions for diverse youth.

    4. Discuss various approaches to developing and implementing behavioral health interventions for youth with different levels of need.

    5. Outline steps to intervention development that incorporate youth, family, and community resources and strengths.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Students will:

    1. Describe the role of culture in behavioral health issues and interventions for youth, including definitions of culture and healthy development from a variety of perspectives.

    2. Give examples of disparities in behavioral health outcomes, including behavioral health challenges specific to culturally diverse youth, and understand the public health impact of lack of access to behavioral health interventions for diverse youth and their families.

    3. Understand cross-cultural interactions and describe specific challenges related to acculturation, discrimination, and migration between the US and nations of origin.

    4. Differentiate levels of behavioral health interventions, including prevention, early intervention, and treatment and specify culturally competent strategies for each level.

    5. Specify strategies for incorporating family and community strengths, resources, and perspectives and collaborating with community-based programs in meeting behavioral health needs of culturally diverse youth.

    6. Critically evaluate research related to best practices and apply research to planning and implementing community-based interventions for culturally diverse youth.

    C. Major Topics

    1. Introduction to the Class: Culture, Behavioral Health, and Youth Development

    2. Behavioral Health Challenges for Culturally Diverse Youth

    3. Impact of Acculturation and Discrimination

    4. Gaps in Behavioral Health Interventions for Culturally Diverse Youth

    5. Recognizing Behavioral Health Needs in Community and School Contexts

    6. Levels of Behavioral Health Interventions and Engagement of Culturally Diverse Youth

    7. Understanding the Linkage between Youth, Families, Schools, and Neighborhoods

    8. Culturally Competent Behavioral Health Interventions for Youth

    9. Models of Community-Based Behavioral Health Interventions

    10. Adapting Behavioral Health Interventions for Culturally Diverse Youth

    11. Collaboration between Community Stakeholders and Behavioral Health Professionals

    12. Capacity Building for Providers, Youth, and Families

    13. Policy Implications for Community-Based Behavioral Health Interventions

    14. Research to Inform the Development of Culturally Competent Community-Based Interventions

    D. Textbooks

    Required readings are accessible through Canvas:Peer reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and other readings are listed in the weekly assignments posted in the Lectures & Readings section of Canvas.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Week 1:

    Goldston, D.B., Molock, S.D., Whitbeck, L.B., Murakami, J.L., Zayas, L.H., & Nagayama Hall, G.C. (2008). Cultural considerations in adolescent suicide prevention and psychological treatment. American Psychologist, 63, 1: 14-31. doi: 10.1037/0003-066X.63.1.14

    Orellana, M.F., Thoren, B., Chee, A., & Lam, W.S.E. (2001). Transnational childhoods: The participation of children in processes of family migration. Social Problems, 48, 4: 572-591.

    Wittchen, H.U., Nelson, C. B., & Lachner, G. (1998). Prevalence of mental disorders and psychosocial impairments in adolescents and young adults. Psychological Medicine, 28, 1: 109-126.

    Week 2:

    Neal-Barnett, A., Crosby, L.E., & Salley, B.B. (2010). Anxiety. In R.L. Hampton, T.P. Gullotta, & R.L. Crowel (Eds.). Handbook of African-American health (pp. 345-374). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

    Whitbeck, L.B., Walls, M.L., Johnson, K.D., Morrisseau, A.D., & McDougall, C.M. (2009). Depressed affect and historical loss among North American indigenous adolescents. American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, 16, 3: 16-41. Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Colorado School of Public Health. Available: www.ucdenver.edu/caianh.

    Yeh, C.J. (2003). Age, acculturation, cultural adjustment, and behavioral health symptoms of Chinese, Korean, and Japanese immigrant youths. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 9, 1: 34-48. doi: 10.1037/1099-9809.9.1.34

    Optional Readings:

    Duval-Harvey, J. & Rogers, K.M. (2010). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In R.L. Hampton, T.P. Gullotta, & R.L. Crowel (Eds.). Handbook of African-American health (pp. 375-418). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

    Williams-Washington, K.N. (2010). Historical trauma. In R.L.Hampton, T.P. Gullotta, & R.L. Crowel (Eds.). Handbook of African-American health (pp. 31-50). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

    Video Clip:

    Go to the YouTube website and watch the video about Equine Therapy at He-He Butte Prevention Camp in Warm Springs, Oregon. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZNqAh7oRQk&feature=plcp

    Week 3:

    Fong, R. (2007). Immigrant and refugee youth: Migration journeys and cultural values. The Prevention Researcher, 14, 4: 3-5.

    Rosenbloom, S.R., & Way, N. (2004). Experiences of discrimination among African American, Asian American, and Latino adolescents in an urban high school. Youth & Society, 35, 4: 420-451.

    Springer, A., Kelder, S., Orpinas, P., and Baumler, E. (2007). A cross-national comparison of youth risk behaviors in Latino secondary school students living in El Salvador and the USA. Ethnicity & Health, 12, 1: 69-88. doi: 10.1080/13557850601002155

    Suárez-Orozco, C. and Suárez-Orozco, M. M. (2001). The psychosocial experience of immigration. In Suárez-Orozco, C. and Suárez-Orozco, M. M., Children of Immigration, pp. 66-86. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Optional Readings:

    Berry, J.W. (2005). Acculturation: Living successfully in two cultures. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 29: 697-712. doi: 10.101016/j.ijintrel.2005.07.013.

    Borrero, N.E., Yeh, C.J., Tito, P., and Luavasa, M. (2009). Alone and in between cultural and academic worlds: Voices of Samoan students. Journal of Education, 190, 3: 47-55.

    Video Clip:

    Go to the YouTube website and watch the video “Cultural Differences” from National Geographic http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BT0kzF4A-WQ

    Week 4:

    Belfer, M.K., and Rorde, L.A. (2005). Child and adolescent mental health in Latin America and the Caribbean: Problems, progress, and policy research. Pan American Journal of Public Health, 18, 4/5: 359-365.

    Borowsky, I.W., Resnick, M.D., Ireland, M., and Blum, R.W. (1999). Suicide attempts among American Indian and Alaska Native Youth. Archives of Pediatric Adolescent Medicine, 153: 573-580.

    Gudiño, O.G., Lau, A.S., and Hough, R.L. (2008). Immigrant status, mental health need, and mental

    health service utilization among high-risk Hispanic and Asian Pacific Islander youth. Child Youth Care Forum, 37: 139–152. doi 10.1007/s10566-008-9056-4

    World Health Organization (2003). Caring for children and adolescents with mental disorders: Setting WHO directions. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization.

    Optional Reading:

    Le, T.N., and Wallen, J. (2009). Risks of non-familial violent physical and emotional victimization in four Asian ethnic groups. Journal of Immigrant Minority Health, 11:174–187

    DOI 10.1007/s10903-007-9100-8

    Weaver, K., and Maddaleno, M. (1999). Youth violence in Latin America: Current situation and violence prevention strategies. Pan American Journal of Public Health, 5, 4: 338-343.

    Video Clip:

    Go to the YouTube website and watch the video “Immigrant Mental Health Services & The Church” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3ZL0HVUuuU

    Week 5:

    Garcia, C.M., and Saewyc, E.M. (2007). Perceptions of mental health among recently immigrated Mexican adolescents. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 28:37-54.

    Kendall-Taylor, N. (2012). Conflicting models of mind: Mapping the gaps between expert and public understandings of child mental health. Science Communication, 34, 6: 695-726.

    Williams, J.H., Horvath, V.E., Wei, H., Van Dorn, R.A., & Jonson-Reid, M. (2007). Teachers’ perspectives of children’s mental health needs in urban elementary schools. Children & Schools, 29, 2: 95-107.

    Optional Reading:

    Nesman, T.M. (2007). A participatory study of school dropout and behavioral health of Latino adolescents. Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 34, 4:414-430.

    Week 6:

    Keller, T.E., Bost, N.S., Lock, E.D., and Marcenko, M.O. (2005). Factors associated with participation of children with mental health problems in structured youth development programs. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 13, 3: 141-151.

    Kutash, K. Duchnowski, A.J., & Lynn, N. (2006). Prevention definitions. In K. Kutash, A.J. Duchnowski, & N. Lynn, School-based mental health: An empirical guide for decision-makers, (pp.7-11). The Research & Training Center for Children’s Mental Health, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, Department of Child & Family Studies, University of South Florida. Available from: http://rtckids.fmhi.usf.edu/rtcpubs/study04/default.cfm

    McNeely, C., Sprecher, K., and Bates, D. (2010). Comparative study of caring across communities: Identifying essential components of comprehensive school-linked mental health services for refugee and immigrant children. Center for the Study of Youth and Political Violence and Department of Public Health University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

    Optional Reading:

    Bernat, D.H., and Resnick, M.D. (2006). Healthy youth development: Science and strategies. Journal of Public Health Management Practice, November (Supplement), S10-S16.

    Bunch, W. (2011). Chapter Four: Caring across communities. In Isaacs, S.L., and Colby, D.C. (Eds.), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Anthology: To Improve Health and Health Care, Volume XIV. Jossey-Bass. Available: http://www.rwjf.org/en/research-publications/find-rwjf-research/2011/01/to-improve-health-and-health-care-volume-xiv/caring-across-communities.html.

    Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (n.d.). Research synthesis: Infant mental health and early care and education providers. The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning: Vanderbilt University. Available: vanderbilt.edu/csefel

    Garrison, E.G., Roy, I.S., & Azar, V. (1999). Responding to the mental health needs of Latino children and families through school-based services. Clinical Psychology Review, 19, 2: 199-219.

    Video Clip:

    Go to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s “Caring Across Communities” website and watch the video http://www.rwjf.org/content/rwjf/en/about-rwjf/newsroom/newsroom-content/2010/05/caring-across-communities.html

    Week 7:

    Briscoe, R. McClain, G. Nesman, T. Mazza, J. & Woodside, M. (2010). The strengths and challenges facing African-American families. In R.L. Hampton, T.P. Gullotta, and R.L. Crowel (Eds.), Handbook of African-American health (pp.3-30). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

    Delgado, M.Y., Updegraff, K.A., Roosa, M.W., & Umaña-Taylor, A.J.(2011). Discrimination and Mexican-origin adolescents’ adjustment: The moderating roles of adolescents’, mothers’, and fathers’ cultural orientations and values. Journal of Youth & Adolescence, 40:125–139. DOI 10.1007/s10964-009-9467-z.

    Stumblingbear-Riddle, G., & Romans, J.S.C. (2012). Resilience among urban American Indian adolescents: Exploration into the role of culture, self-esteem, subjective well-being, and social support. American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, 19, 2: 1-19. doi: 10.5820/aian.1902.2012.1

    Xue, Y., Leventhal, T., Brooks-Gunn, J. & Earls, F.J. (2005). Neighborhood residence and mental health problems of 5- to 11-year-olds. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62: 554-562.

    Optional Reading:

    Katz, D.M., and Fox, A.M. (2010). Risk and protective factors associated with gang-involved youth in Trinidad and Tobago. Pan American Journal of Public Health, 27, 3: 187-202.

    Zhou, Q., Tao, A., Chen, S.H., Main. A., Lee, E., Ly, J., Hua, M., and Li, X. (2012). Asset and protective factors for Asian American children’s mental health adjustment. Child Development Perspectives, 6, 3: 312-319.

    Week 8:

    Hernandez, M., Nesman, T., Mowery, D., Acevedo-Polakovich, I. D., & Callejas, L. M. (2009). Cultural competence: A review and conceptual model for psychiatric and mental health services. Psychiatric Services, 60, 8: 1046-1050.

    Mock, M. (2007). Cultural sensitivity, relevance, and competence in school mental health. In S.W. Evans, N.A. Lever, & M.D. Weist (Eds.), Handbook of School Mental Health: Advancing Practice and Research, pp. 349-362. New York: Springer.

    Nicolas, G., Arntz, D.L., Hirsch, B., & Schmeidigen, A. (2009). Cultural adaptation of a group treatment for Haitian American adolescents. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 40, 4: 378-384.

    Optional Reading:

    Liang, B., and West, J. (2007). Youth mentoring: Do race and ethnicity really matter? Research in Action, 9, 1-25. Available: www.mentoring.org

    Reese, L.E., and Vera, E.M. (2007). Culturally relevant prevention: The scientific and practical considerations of community-based programs. The Counseling Psychologist, 35: 763-778. DOI: 10.1177/0011000007304588.

    Week 9:

    Lowie, J.A., Lever, N., Ambrose, M. G., Tager, S., & Hill, S. (2007). Partnering with families in expanded school mental health programs. In S.W. Evans, N.A. Lever, & M.D. Weist (Eds.), Handbook of school mental health: Advancing practice and research, pp. 135-148. New York: Springer.

    Nastasi, B.K., Moore, R.B., & Varjas, K.M. (2004). Components of the participatory culture-specific intervention model: An illustration. In B. K. Nastasi, R. B. Moore, & K. M. Varjas, School-based mental health services: Creating comprehensive and culturally specific programs (pp. 53-72). Washington DC: American Psychological Association.

    Rhodes, J. (2005). Research corner: Mentoring immigrant youth. National Mentoring Partnership. Available: www.mentoring.org

    Optional Reading:

    Nation, M., Crusto, C., Wandersman, A., Kumpfer, K.L>, Seybolt, D., Morrissey-Kane, E. and Davino, K. (2003). What works in prevention: Principles of effective prevention programs. American Psychologist, 58, 449-456.

    World Health Organization. (2005). Atlas: child and adolescent mental health resources: Global concerns, implications for the future. Geneva, Switzerland: WHO.

    Week 10:

    Nastasi, B.K., Moore, R.B., & Varjas, K.M. (2004). Participatory culture-specific intervention: Formative (research) phases. In B. K. Nastasi, R. B. Moore, & K. M. Varjas, School-based mental health services: Creating comprehensive and culturally specific programs (pp. 79-107). Washington DC: American Psychological Association.

    Samuels, J., Schudrich, W., and Altschul, D. (2009). Toolkit for modifying evidence-based practices to increase cultural competence. Orangeburg, NY: Research Foundation for Mental Health. Available: http://ssrdqst.rfmh.org/cecc/

    Yeh, C.J., Ching, A.M., Okubo, Y. and Luthar, S.S. (2007). Development of a mentoring program for Chinese immigrant adolescents’ cultural adjustment. Adolescence, 42, 168: 733- 747.

    Optional Reading:

    Blanco-Vega, C.O., Castro-Olivo, S.M., Merrell, K.W. (2008). Social-emotional needs of Latino immigrant adolescents: A sociocultural model for development and implementation of culturally specific interventions. Journal of Latinos and Education, 7, 1:43-61.doi: 10.1080/1534843701693390

    Wandersman, A. (2003). Community science: Bridging the gap between science and practice with community-centered models. American Journal of Community Psychology, 31, ¾: 227-242.

    Week 11:

    Atkins, M., Frazier, S. Abdul Adil, J., Talbott, E. (2007). School-based mental health services in urban communities. In Steven W. Evans, N.A. Lever, & M.D. Weist, Handbook of school mental health: Advancing practice and research (pp. 165-178). New York: Springer.

    Buchanan, C.L., Daly, B.P., Taylor, L.K., Weist, M.D., & Wandersman, A. (2011). Expanding interdisciplinary collaboration in school mental health: The role of graduate programs. Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Youth, 11, 3: 67-73.

    Center of Excellence in Culturally Competent Mental Health (N.D.). Cultural elements in community-defined evidence-based mental health programs. New York: Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research. Available: http://ssrdqst.rfmh.org/cecc/sites/ssrdqst.rfmh.org.cecc/UserFiles/DOCUMENTING%20CC%20IN%203%20PROMISING%20PRACTICES.pdf

    Optional Reading:

    Kataoka, S.H., Stein, B.D., Jaycox, L.H., Wong, M., Escudero, P., Tu, W., Zaragoza, C., & Fink, A. (2003). A school-based mental health program for traumatized Latino immigrant children. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 42, 3: 311-318.

    Week 12:

    Keller, T.E. (2007). Program staff in youth mentoring programs: Qualifications, training, and retention. Research in Action, 3, 1-20. Available: www.mentoring.org

    Power, T., Manz, P., & Left, S. (2007). Training for effective practice in the schools. In S.W. Evans, N.A. Lever, & M.D. Weist (Eds.), Handbook of school mental health: Advancing practice and research, pp. 257-274. New York: Springer.

    Webster-Stratton, C., Reinke, W.M., Herman, K.C., and Newcomer, L.L. (2011). The Incredible Years teacher classroom management training: The methods and principles that support fidelity of training delivery. School Psychology Review, 40, 4: 509–529.

    Optional Reading:

    Oppenheim, J. & Evert, R.J. (2002). An elementary school mental health program serving immigrant and minority children. In Ghuman, H.S., Weist, M.D., and Sarles, R.M. Providing mental health services to youth where they are: School and community-based approaches (pp.39-56). New York: Brunner-Routledge.

    Week 13:

    Dettlaff, A.J., and Rycraft, J.R. (2010). Adapting systems of care for child welfare practice with immigrant Latino children and families. Evaluation and Program Planning, 33:303-310.

    Periago, M.R. (2005). Mental health: A public health priority in the Americas. Pan American Journal of Public Health, 18, 4/5: 226-228.

    Weist, M.D., Burke, R.W., Paternite, D.E., Grumet, J.G., & Flaspohler, P. (2010). School mental health. In Levin, B.L., Hennesy, K.D., & Petrila, J. Mental Health Services: A Public Health Perspective (pp. 401-420). Oxford: Oxford University press.

    Week 14:

    Chinman, M., Hannah, G., Wandersman, A., Ebener, P., Hunter, S. B., Imm, P., and Sheldon, J. (2005). Developing a community science research agenda for building community capacity for effective preventive interventions. American Journal of Community Psychology, 35, 3/4: 143-157. doi: 10.1007/s10464-005-3390-6.

    Flaspohler, P.D., Anderson-Butcher, D., Paternite, C.E., Weist, M., & Wandersman, A. (2006). Community science and expanded school mental health: Bridging the research-to-practice gap to promote child well-being and academic success. Educational & Child Psychology, 23, 1: 27-39.

    Swanson, D.P., Spencer, M.B., Harpalani, V., Dupree, D., Noll, E., Ginzburg, S. & Seaton, G. (2003). Psychosocial development in racially and ethnically diverse youth: Conceptual and methodological challenges in the 21st century. Development and Psychopathology, 15:743-771. DOI: 10.1017.S0954579403000361

    Trickett, E.J., Beehler, S., Deutsch, C., Green, L.W., Hawe, P., McLeroy, K., Miller, R.L., Rapkin, B.D., Schensul, J.J., Schulz, A.J., and Trimble, J.E. (2011). Advancing the science of community-level interventions. American Journal of Public Health, 101, 8: 1410-1419.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    1. Weekly Course Participation - Discussion Board Posts (35%- 35 points out of 100) Narrated PowerPoint presentations and other information and activities will be posted on Canvas along with readings for each week. These will be the basis for required posts to the online Discussion Board.

    2. Activity Assignments (20%- 20 points out of 100)

    Students will be given an activity to carry out every two weeks during the first part of the course. The write-up of each activity is to be submitted through Canvas by the due date given. Activity Assignments are designed to guide students in developing and completing their Final Paper.

    3. Mid-term Paper (10% - 10 points out of 100)

    Conduct two interviews with a provider and/or community member and submit a summary description of the interview process.

    Grading for Discussion Board posts and Activity Assignments will be based on the following criteria:

    •Submitted on time. Since this is a course that provides weekly assignments, which is equivalent to participating in an in-person class, your submissions must be made during the assigned week or you will forfeit the points for the assignment.

    •Of graduate level quality

    •Containing appropriate content, including discussion related to lectures and readings as well as responses to the assigned questions or instructions.

    •Meeting the minimum word or page count

    •Free of typographic errors

    4. Final Paper (35% - 35 points out of 100)

    The Final paper is a written proposal for a culturally competent neighborhood or school related behavioral health intervention for a specific community context. The proposal must include a description of the school and/or neighborhood population, and the major behavioral health, learning, and social issues faced by youth. It must also describe existing services in the school and/or neighborhood that address behavioral health issues, identify gaps in services, and provide a plan for developing a culturally competent behavioral health intervention that fills in gaps in services for youth in that school/neighborhood. Students must incorporate throughout the paper at least three topics that have been covered in the course. The proposal must be supported by data from two interviews conducted with a service provider who works for a school or neighborhood program and a community member. Each should have some knowledge of the youth behavrioal health issues in that community. The final paper must also incorporate assigned course readings and additional readings related to proposal topics. The paper must include information from academic (i.e. peer reviewed) journal articles and books that support the proposed plan (with citations and references). Citations cannot be from newspaper articles or other non peer-reviewed media such as Wikipedia.

    Course Grades will be based upon the following categories:

    Discussion Board - 35% (35 points out of 100)

    Activity write-ups - 20% (20 points out of 100)

    Mid-Term Activity write-up - 10% (10 points out of 100)

    Final Paper 35% - (35 points out of 100)

    Final grades will be assigned according to the following scale:

    A+ 97 up to 100

    A 93 up to

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Week 1:

    Introduction to the Class: Culture, Behavioral Health, and Youth Development

    Note: ___is the last day for Drop/Add.

    Overview: This class will discuss definitions of culture, behavioral health and healthy development from a variety of perspectives. It will also introduce the concept of cultural competence.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday ______Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______Midnight.

    Week 2:

    Behavioral Health Challenges for Culturally Diverse Youth

    Overview: This lecture will examine specific behavioral health challenges of culturally diverse youth. Students will also consider child and adolescent development, school success, and behavioral health. Issues and challenges related to meeting the needs of diverse children/adolescents will also be considered.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Activity A:

    Identify two people to interview and set a tentative date for the interviews. One must be completed before ___________, 2014. The second interview must be completed before __________, 2014. At least one interviewee work in a school or neighborhood program that serves diverse children and/or adolescents. The other interview must be with a community member who is a leader or parent and who knows the culture of the community. Consider people who can contribute to your knowledge about developmental, social, and cultural issues of the youth served, and can provide useful information and perspectives on needed behavioral health interventions. You will be using information from the interviews in your Midterm and Final Paper. Submit potential interviewee names, organization names, job descriptions, and reasons for choosing each interviewee to the instructor through Canvas, due by _________11:59pm EST.

    Week 3:

    Impact of Acculturation and Discrimination

    Overview: This lecture addresses cross-cultural interactions that occur as children and adolescents from different backgrounds interact in schools and neighborhoods. We will discuss some specific impacts of discrimination, acculturation, and migration between the US and nations of origin.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday _____ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, _____ Midnight.

    Activity B:

    Develop a set of at least 10 questions to use in your two interviews. Include questions about beliefs and understanding of behavioral health, the major developmental, social, cultural, and mental health issues of diverse youth in their community/school, what they think is missing in services, and their perspectives on how to work effectively with diverse youth in their community or school. Use class readings and other books and articles to develop the questions and list these in a “References” section at the end of your assignment. Submit the questions and citations to the instructor through Canvas, due by _______, 11:59pm EST. You must have the questions approved by the instructor prior to conducting the interviews.

    Week 4:

    Gaps in Behavioral Health Interventions for Culturally Diverse Youth

    Overview: This lecture will look at services and supports offered in schools and communities in the US and in nations of origin. It will also examine gaps in services for culturally diverse youth.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Week 5:

    Recognizing Behavioral Health Needs in Community and School Contexts

    Overview: This week we will examine how behavioral health needs are identified by various community stakeholders.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Midterm (Activity C):

    Conduct your first interview with a provider or community member and submit a summary description of the interview process: Any problems in scheduling, communication/trust building issues, where the interviews were conducted, how well your questions were understood and the quality of answers given, ways you asked the questions or followed up to get more information, how you recorded or wrote down responses, how you felt about the interviews, a few things you learned that surprised you, what additional information you need to understand the program/school and the population it serves, and how you might go about getting missing information. Submit to the instructor through Canvas by _______, 11:59pm EST.

    Week 6:

    Levels of Behavioral Health Interventions and Engagement of Culturally Diverse Youth

    Overview: This lecture will discuss different levels of need that have been documented in the design of behavioral health interventions. It will also bring out the importance of paying attention to influences of culture and experiences in countries of origin in developing and implementing such interventions in order to ensure engagement of youth.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday, ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Week 7:

    Understanding the Linkage between Youth, Families, Schools, and Neighborhoods

    Overview: This lecture will present the important factors that youth workers, behavioral health providers, and educators must consider if they want to incorporate family and community perspectives in their work. Examples of approaches that pay attention to family and community strengths, resources, and perspectives on behavioral health and appropriate interventions for youth will be presented.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday, February, Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Activity D:

    Conduct your second interview with a provider or community stakeholder. Write a summary of BOTH interviews covering each question and each interviewee’s response. Submit your summary to the instructor through Canvas by _______, 2014, 11:59pm EST.

    Week 8:

    Culturally Competent Behavioral Health Interventions for Youth

    Overview: In this lecture we will explore definitions and concepts related to cultural competence in working with diverse children/adolescents and their families.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Week 9:

    Models of Community-Based Behavioral Health Interventions

    Overview: In this lecture, examples of community-based behavioral health interventions will be presented and discussed to illustrate the process of model development for specific school/neighborhood contexts.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday, ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Week 10:

    Adapting Behavioral Health Interventions for Culturally Diverse Youth

    Note: ____, 2014 is last day to drop with a “W” grade.

    Overview: This lecture examines culturally competent approaches to intervention development, including planning and evaluation processes.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday, ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Activity E:

    Develop a title and detailed outline for your Final Paper. Also include a short description of the school or community/neighborhood context and population of youth you will be writing about. Submit to the instructor through Canvas, due by ______, 11:59pm EST.

    Week 11:

    Collaboration between Community Stakeholders and Behavioral Health Professionals

    Overview: This class will consider issues related to collaboration between behavioral health providers and community-based program personnel in meeting the needs of culturally diverse youth.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday, ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Week 12:

    Capacity Building for Providers, Youth, and Families

    Overview: In this class we will consider the types of capacity building and infrastructure supports that might be needed while developing and implementing a community-based behavioral health intervention with/ for culturally diverse youth.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday, ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Activity E (revisions)

    If requested by the Instructor, make revisions to the outline, and description of population of youth for your Final Paper. Submit to the instructor by the due date you are given.

    Reminder: Final Paper is due by ______, 11:59pm EST

    Week 13:

    Policy Implications for Community-Based Behavioral Health Interventions

    Overview: This lecture will discuss adaptations that might need to occur at the policy level in order to develop and implement culturally relevant behavioral health services in collaboration with communities and schools.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday, ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Week 14:

    Research to Inform the Development of Culturally Competent Community-Based Interventions

    Reminder: Final Paper is due by ______, 11:59pm EST

    Overview: This class will examine future directions and recommendations for research and development of intervention models for specific community contexts and diverse youth populations.

    Discussion Board:

    Response to posted question due by Thursday, ______ Midnight.

    Responses to two classmates’ posts due by Saturday, ______ Midnight.

    Week 15:– Individual consultation with instructor and work on final paper

    ______ Final Paper Due by 11:59pm EST

    H. Attendance Policy

    Required Weekly Classes:

    This course is conducted entirely through Canvas. It is divided into weekly lectures and reading assignments that must be completed before the due date each week. Weekly assignments are 35% of your grade. You are required to write and post responses to questions on the Discussion Board in Canvas each week and then participate in the discussion by posting responses to two other students. Each assignment must be completed within the week for which it is scheduled in order to receive credit for the assignment. Your weekly grade will be posted on Canvas for you to track your progress throughout the course.

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Due to the distance-learning format of this course, traditional attendance policies will not apply. If a student is unable to complete an assignment on time, he/she should notify the instructor as soon as possible and provide written documentation of an extended illness or other extenuating circumstances. Any Discussion Board responses that are posted after the due date will not receive credit unless there is prior notification to the instructor. Students should contact the instructor in advance if they know (because of travel, etc.) they will miss an assignment and make arrangements with the instructor for assignment completion.

    Academic Integrity of Students: The USF expects students to maintain academic honesty in all courses. If cheating in any form (academic dishonesty) is detected, appropriate action will be taken. Review USF policies on Academic Integrity of Students at:

    http://www.grad.usf.edu/policies_Sect7_full.php.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MS in Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.