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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - MHS7749

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2013-10-24
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/6/13 - for new Child Bev Health Prog. Approved. Cleared Syst Concurrence 7/31/13. to SCNS 8/5/13. Nmbr 7741 apprd as 7749 eff 9/1/13


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    3146 2013-04-01
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Child and Family Studies BC TPA, 583001, 10000, 000000, 0000000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Tom Massey, PhD 9746403 massey@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    MHS 7749 Applications in Dissemination and Implementation Science

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Dissemination & Implementation
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 100

    Prerequisites

    MHS 7746; PHC 6728

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    This course covers competencies in the application of translational science necessary to understand, evaluate, and conduct your own dissemination and implementation research in child and adolescent behavioral health.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    A specific focus on Child & Adolescent Behavioral Health is in demand as evidenced by surveys with undergraduate and graduate students at USF conducted in fall of 2012. A review of existing courses does not show offerings similar to this course.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    In additional to a doctoral degree, instructor should have substantial knowledge in behavioral health.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The objective of this course is to cover competencies in the application of translational science necessary to understand, evaluate, and conduct dissemination and implementation research in child and adolescent behavioral health. This course will allow students to develop and understanding of the major theories and theoretical frameworks that contribute to the field of translational science, key concepts of implementation science as they relate to the adoption of new innovations and evidence-based practices, and the multiple risk factors that increase the incidence of drug abuse and mental, emotional and behavioral disorders in children and adolescents.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    At the end of this course, students will:

    1. Understand the importance and language of translational science and dissemination and implementation research.

    2. Understand the theories and frameworks that are commonly used in dissemination and implementation research and practice.

    3. Demonstrate knowledge of the critical issues in the ethical conduct of applied research and evaluation.

    4. Demonstrate knowledge of the application of study designs and methods that support the research of translational science across various settings and populations.

    C. Major Topics

    Background and History of Dissemination and Implementation Science

    History and Philosophy of Translational Research and Implementation Science

    The Role of Organizational Structure and Systems Processes in Dissemination and Implementation Research

    Theory, and Theoretical Models and Frameworks for Dissemination and Implementation Research

    Key Components of Implementation Science and the Adoption of New Innovations

    Dissemination and Implementation Research in Community Settings

    Implementation and Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practices

    Fidelity and Sustainability

    Evaluation of Implementation and Dissemination Research

    Challenges to Dissemination and Implementation

    Measurement Issues in Dissemination and Implementation Research

    Dissemination and Implementation Research: Research to Practice to Policy

    Dissemination and Implementation Research: Stakeholder Analysis

    D. Textbooks

    Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health, (2012). Brownson, Colditz & Proctor (Eds.) Oxford University Press, New York.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Rabin, B. A., Brownson, R. C., Haire-Joshu, D., Kreuter, M. W., & Weaver, N. L. (2008). A glossary for dissemination and implementation research in health. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 14(2), 117-123.

    Woolf, S. H. (2008). The meaning of translational research and why it matters. JAMA: the journal of the American Medical Association, 299(2), 211-213.

    Tabak, R. G., Khoong, E. C., Chambers, D. A., & Brownson, R. C. (2012). Bridging Research and Practice: Models for Dissemination and Implementation Research. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 43(3), 337-350.

    Glasgow, R. E., Green, L. W., Taylor, M. V., & Stange, K. C. (2012). An evidence integration triangle for aligning science with policy and practice. American journal of preventive medicine, 42(6), 646-654.

    Fixsen, D., Blase, K., Metz, A., & van Dyke, M. (2013). Statewide implementation of evidence-based programs. Exceptional Children, 79(2), 213-230.

    Kratochwill, T. R., Hoagwood, K. E., Kazak, A. E., Weisz, J. R., Hood, K., Vargas, L. A., & Banez, G. A. (2012). Practice-Based Evidence for Children and Adolescents: Advancing the Research Agenda in Schools. School Psychology Review, 41(2), 215-235.

    Torrey, W. C., Bond, G. R., McHugo, G. J., & Swain, K. (2012). Evidence-based practice implementation in community mental health settings: the relative importance of key domains of implementation activity. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 39, 353-364.

    Aarons, G. A., Hurlburt, M., & Horwitz, S. M. (2011). Advancing a conceptual model of evidence-based practice implementation in public service sectors. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 38(1), 4-23.

    Pas, E. T., & Bradshaw, C. P. (2012). Examining the Association Between Implementation and Outcomes. Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 417, 433.

    Fagan, A. A., Hanson, K., Hawkins, J. D., & Arthur, M. W. (2008). Bridging science to practice: Achieving prevention program implementation fidelity in the Community Youth Development Study. American Journal of Community Psychology, 41(3), 235-249.

    Trochim, W. M., Kane, C., Graham, M., & Pincus, H. A. (2011). Evaluating Translational Research. Clinical Translational Research, 4(3), 153-162.

    Proctor, E. K., Landsverk, J., Aarons, G., Chambers, D., Glisson, C., & Mittman, B. (2009). Implementation research in mental health services: An emerging science with conceptual, methodological, and training challenges. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 36(1), 24-34.

    Bertram, R., Blase, K., Shern, D., Shea, P., & Fixsen, D. (2011). Policy research brief: Implementation opportunities and challenges for prevention and promotion initiatives. Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

    Hoagwood, K. E., Green, E., Kelleher, K., Schoenwald, S., Rolls-Reutz, J., Landsverk, J., ... & Mayberg, S. (2008). Family advocacy, support and education in children’s mental health: Results of a national survey. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 35(1), 73-83.

    Arrington, B., Kimmey, J., Brewster, M., Bentley, J., Kane, M., Van Brunschot, C., ... & Brownson, R. C. (2008). Building a local agenda for dissemination of research into practice. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 14(2), 185-192.

    Aarons, G. A., Wells, R. S., Zagursky, K., Fettes, D. L., & Palinkas, L. A. (2009). Implementing evidence-based practice in community mental health agencies: A multiple stakeholder analysis. Journal Information, 99(11).

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    1) Class Presentation: 15 Percent

    2) Applications of Translational Science in Research, Method Paper and Abstract: 15/5 Percent (paper/abstract)

    3) Midterm Exam 30 Percent

    4) Final Exam 30 Percent

    5) Course Participation. 5 Percent

    Grading scale:

    94 – 100 = A

    90 – less than 94 = A-

    87 – less than 90 = B+

    84 – less than 87 = B

    80 – less than 84 = B-

    77 – less than 80 = C+

    73 – less than 77 = C

    70 – less than 74 = C-

    67 – less than 70 = D+

    64 – less than 67 = D

    60 – less than 64 = D-

    less than 60 = F

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    1) Class Presentation: 15 Percent

    Each week, a student (or team of students) will be assigned to present an example and illustrations of critical material related to the lecture. Each student will be graded for their effort independently. The group members may determine how the tasks are completed. Student(s) will creatively design an activity to enforce the key points of the previous week’s materials as it is relevant for their own professional interests and concentration. This activity should demonstrate the application of the principles, methodologies, etc., addressed in the lecture. This activity should take approximately 30 minutes and may include a review of exemplars in research, visual demonstrations, or real world examples, and should be designed to engage and illustrate the topics to maximize the understanding for their fellow students.

    2) Applications of Translational Science in Research, Method Paper and Abstract: 15/5 Percent (paper/abstract) This will be a short paper, with a maximum limit of 6 pages (single spaced) in which students will demonstrate their proficiency in designing methodologically sound research associated with translational science within their broad area of interest. The proposal must specify the research questions or hypotheses of interest, specific aims, background, relevance, and the plan of study. Students will describe sample, study design, and statistical analysis needed to address the specific aims. A paper abstract will be due prior to submission of the paper. See course calendar for due dates.

    Exams: There will be two examinations, a midterm and final. Material will be taken from the book, required readings, lectures, and discussions. The format of the test will be short essay answers. There will be no multiple choice, true/false, or fill in the blank questions. Examinations will be of a length to allow completion during the regular class period. Each test will cover only the material for that portion of the course. The final will not be cumulative.

    3) Midterm Exam 30 Percent

    The midterm exam will be a closed book, in-class exam and will consist of short answer and essay questions. The material covered will be taken from the textbook, lectures, assigned readings, and discussions. If you unable to take an exam, please contact Dr. Massey within 24 hours to make arrangements for rescheduling the exam. Please have adequate documentation available upon request.

    4) Final Exam 30 Percent

    The final exam will be a closed book, in-class exam and will consist of short answer and essay questions. The material covered will be taken from the textbook, lectures, assigned readings, and discussions. If you unable to take an exam, please contact Dr. Massey within 24 hours to make arrangements for rescheduling the exam. Please have adequate documentation available upon request.

    5) Course Participation. 5 Percent Participation includes class attendance, completing course readings prior to class, and participation in class discussions. Spot checks: During the semester students will also have opportunities to answer impromptu questions regarding the discussion and lecture for that class. The questions will come from the readings, lecture, student presentation, or discussion for that class.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Class attendance will be taken into consideration when evaluating students’ participation in the course. Students who miss more than one class session will, in general, have difficulty achieving the level of active participation expected on a consistent basis.

    Students who anticipate the necessity of being absent from class due to the observation of a major religious observance must provide notice of the date(s) to the instructor, in writing, by the second class meeting. Exceptions may be given for family emergencies, personal illness or other circumstances; however, any exceptions will be up to the discretion of the instructor.

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Canvas, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Canvas site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    If a student is unable to take an exam, please contact the instructor within 24 hours to make arrangements for rescheduling the exam. Please have adequate documentation available upon request.

    Disruption of the academic process and violations of the policies regarding academic integrity will not be tolerated.

    http://generalcounsel.usf.edu/regulations/pdfs/regulation-usf6.0021.pdf

    Review USF policies on Academic Integrity of Students at:

    http://www.grad.usf.edu/policies_Sect7_full.php.

    If a student is unable to take an exam, please contact Dr. Massey within 24 hours to make arrangements for rescheduling the exam. Please have adequate documentation available upon request.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MS in Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.