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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - PHC6761

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-10-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: Change
Course Change Information (for course changes only): Remove PHC 6000 and 6050 as co-requisite courses; add PHC 6000 and 6050 as pre-requisite courses with concurrence.
Comments: to GC 5/6/13 for MPH Conc Changes. Need text, concurrence. Faculty emailed 5/9/13. Concr. Rcd. From Anthro. To chair 7/17/13. GC apprd 8/5/13. to USF Sys. To SCNS 8/23/13. Apprd eff 10/1/14


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    3112 2013-03-01
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Global Health PH 640800
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Kate Wolfe-Quintero 8139745241 kwolfequ@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    PHC 6761 Global Health Assessment Strategies

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Global Health Assessment Strat
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    PHC 6764

    Corequisites

    PHC 6000, PHC 6050

    Course Description

    This course provides a systematic approach for the assessment of public health interventions in low resource countries by providing tools and skills to collect, retrieve, manage, assemble, analyze and communicate information at the community level.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Global Health Assessment Strategies is the second in a series of four foundation courses for the Concentration in Global Health Practice. This course will provide a systematic approach for the assessment of public health interventions in low resource countries. Therefore, the course intends to provide technical tools and skills to collect, retrieve, manage, assemble, analyze and communicate information at the community level. It will include statistics on health status, community health needs, epidemiological profiles, and existing health interventions. This course will provide a hands-on approach to a key element of global health practice – assessment strategies.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    A doctorate in global health or related field.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Define a public health problem and then select relevant variables to assess the needs of a community in a low resource country

    2. Apply ethical principles to the collection, maintenance, use, and dissemination of data and information

    3. Carry out a preliminary needs assessment

    4. Elaborate questionnaires

    5. Design electronic forms

    6. Store information in an electronic table

    7. Export/Import data

    8. Perform a preliminary analysis of data

    9. Determine appropriate uses and limitations of both quantitative and qualitative data

    10. Diagnose and analyze a public health problem using available data

    11. Perform data entry and management and ensure quality assurance with Epi-InfoTM

    12. Perform basic data analysis with Epi-InfoTM

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1) Be able to design a needs assessment for health interventions in low resource countries

    2) Be able to make a plan for field operations in low resource countries

    3) Perform basic analysis of data in settings with restricted technology

    4) Be able to make sample calculations for the assessment of health interventions

    5) Be able to define outcome measurements to assess the impact of a health intervention in the incidence, prevalence and severity of main diseases in low resource countries

    6) Acquire general knowledge in the collection, handling, and storage of data and laboratory samples in the field

    C. Major Topics

    Week 1 – Introduction to Needs Assessment

    Week 2 – Needs Assessment Strategies in Low Resource Countries

    Week 3 – The Process of Needs Assessments

    Weeks 4 – Data Sources for Global Health Needs Assessments

    Week 5 – Developing a Work Plan & Survey Development

    Week 6 – Quantitative Data Management and Collection

    Week 7 – Qualitative Data in the Assessment of Global Health

    Week 8 – Communicating Needs for Community Action

    Week 11 – Community Assessment Project Workshop

    Week 14 – Determining and Developing Solutions

    D. Textbooks

    Petersen, D. & Alexander, G. (2001). Needs Assessment in Public Health: A practical guide for students and professionals. New York: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.

    Jacobsen, K. (2011). Introduction to Health Research Methods: A Practical Guide. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning ISBN: 9780763783341

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Epi Info Manual - available: http://www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/Epi6/EI6dnjp.htm

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    There will be assignments related to each key skill taught in this course (either team and individual). Your grade will, therefore, reflect both your work as an individual and as a team. There will be many writing assignments and much class discussion. You will be expected to participate and to complete all reading and assignments prior to attending class.

    Additional information on the individual assignments will be presented in the class covering the skillset.

    Additional Expectations:

    Deadlines: Each week‟s assignment, unless otherwise stated, is due no later than 2:00 pm or the start of class. Late assignments will affect your grade. Assignments should be submitted through Canvas (by 2:00 pm) and a hard copy should be brought to class. For each day an assignment is late, the grade will go down one letter. All assignments must be completed to pass the course.

    Attendance: This is a skill based course. Therefore, you must attend class to understand the work and assignments. If you must miss a class, it is your responsibility to get the lecture notes and the assignment from a teammate. You will not be permitted to make up any in class assignments.Students who anticipate being absent from class due to the observation of a major religious observance must provide notice of the dates to the instructor, in writing, on the second day of classes.

    Teamwork: Teams will be divided by interest area. Working on a team can be difficult but is imperative to public health work. As a member of a team, you are expected to pull your own weight and attendance at all team related activities, meetings, etc. is required and a log of participation will be turned in as part of your final project. You are expected to act as a professional and work through team related problems. If there are problems, this is the perfect time to practice problem-solving. (You will have similar experiences in the “real world”). However, if the problem gets to the point that project work is disrupted, please bring it to my attention.

    Readings: It is expected that you complete readings prior to the session they are being covered to allow for discussion. Textbook readings have been assigned in the schedule. However, students may be given additional materials and readings at the end of each class for the next session.

    Students will be graded on:

    1. Exam 1 – 25 points (25% of your final grade)

    2. Checkpoint Assignments: You will be given a series of assignments leading up to your culminating project, the Community Assessment Project. Each of these assignments will cover a valuable skillset discussed in class and imperative for conducting a community assessment project. Checkpoint assignments will be worth 35 total points (35% of your final grade), as outlined below.

    a. Critical Review of the Literature (Individual Assignment)– 10 pts

    b. Field Observations and Reflection (Individual Assignment) - 10 pts

    c. Workplan (Group Assignment)- 5 pts

    d. IRB Application (Group Assignment) and CITI (Individual Assignment) - 5 pts

    e. Survey Development/Epi Info Assignment (Group Assignment)- 5 pts

    3. Community Assessment Project and Presentation - 30 points (30% of your final grade) This is a group assignment and is the culmination of our work this semester. However, your final grade will be based on the overall group project and presentation as well as your individual performance. You will also be graded by each of your team members. More information will be presented in class.

    4. In Class Assignments and Participation- 10 points (10% of your final grade)

    Periodically, there will be in class assignments, quizzes and other activities. These assignments may be unannounced (i.e. quizzes). There will be no make up for missed, in class assignments.

    A+ = 97-100

    A = 93-96.9

    A- = 90-92.9

    B+ = 87-89.9

    B = 83-86.9

    B- = 80-82.9

    C+ = 77-79.9

    C = 73-76.9

    C- = 70-72.9

    D+ = 67-69.9

    D = 60-66.9

    F =

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Students will be graded on:

    1. Exam 1 – 25 points (25% of your final grade)

    2. Checkpoint Assignments: You will be given a series of assignments leading up to your culminating project, the Community Assessment Project. Each of these assignments will cover a valuable skillset discussed in class and imperative for conducting a community assessment project. Checkpoint assignments will be worth 35 total points (35% of your final grade), as outlined below.

    a. Critical Review of the Literature (Individual Assignment)– 10 pts

    b. Field Observations and Reflection (Individual Assignment) - 10 pts

    c. Workplan (Group Assignment)- 5 pts

    d. IRB Application (Group Assignment) and CITI (Individual Assignment) - 5 pts

    e. Survey Development/Epi Info Assignment (Group Assignment)- 5 pts

    3. Community Assessment Project and Presentation - 30 points (30% of your final grade) This is a group assignment and is the culmination of our work this semester. However, your final grade will be based on the overall group project and presentation as well as your individual performance. You will also be graded by each of your team members. More information will be presented in class.

    4. In Class Assignments and Participation- 10 points (10% of your final grade)

    Periodically, there will be in class assignments, quizzes and other activities. These assignments may be unannounced (i.e. quizzes). There will be no make up for missed, in class assignments.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Attendance: This is a skill based course. Therefore, you must attend class to understand the work and assignments. If you must miss a class, it is your responsibility to get the lecture notes and the assignment from a teammate. You will not be permitted to make up any in class assignments.Students who anticipate being absent from class due to the observation of a major religious observance must provide notice of the dates to the instructor, in writing, on the second day of classes.

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    • All your work must be submitted on time; no late work will be accepted.

    • All your work must be submitted through the course site (not emailed or otherwise sent to the instructor) and turned in as a hard copy before class on the day that it is due. No late assignments will be accepted.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    The Master of Public Health in Global Health Practice


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    Dual Masters degree in Global Health and Anthropology.



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.