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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - SCE7895

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-02-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/6/13 for Science Ed Conc. Changes. Desc too long. Fac emailed 5/10/13. Updated; GC apprd 10/28/13; to USF Sys 11/21/13; to SCNS 12/3/13. Sub 7090, apprvd as 7895 effective 2/1/14


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2995 2012-11-04
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Secondary Education ED 172400
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Herman bcherman@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    SCE 7895 Philosophy and Nature of Science

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Philosophy & Nature of Science
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    focuses on the philosophy and nature of science, including how science and scientists function, the ontological and epistemological foundations of science, and the reciprocal role between science and society.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Required course for Science Education PhD program

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 1 time

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    PhD. in Science Education or related field


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The students in this course will learn:

    1.The history, philosophy, and nature of science and its relevance for K-post-secondary science education.

    2. Rationales and guidance for accurately portraying the history, philosophy and nature of science in everyday instruction.

    3.The history, philosophy and nature of science as portrayed in formal (school science) and informal (television media) learning environments.

    4. How developmentally appropriate explicit history, philosophy and nature of science instruction should occur through content, materials, and activities in various contexts (within and outside the context of science)

    5. How to evaluate and modify existing science education curriculum to better portray the history, philosophy and nature of science.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1.The students will develop and demonstrate a deep understanding of the history, philosophy, and nature of science.

    2.The students will develop and articulate a well-informed and compelling rationale for accurately portraying the nature of science in everyday instruction.

    3.The students will develop and articulate a set of developmentally appropriate student actions consistent with an understanding of the nature of science.

    4. The students will describe and construct effective explicit history, philosophy, and nature of science content, materials, and activities in varied contexts.

    5. The students will evaluate how the history, philosophy, and nature of science is presented in varied learning environments-formal and informal.

    6. The students will articulate how developmentally explicit history, philosophy and nature of science instruction should occur through content, materials, and activities in science classrooms.

    7 The students will understand how to modify existing curriculum and materials so they effectively convey the history, philosophy, and nature of science.

    C. Major Topics

    This course focuses on the history, philosophy and nature of science – particularly as it relates to learning science. Those that study the philosophy and nature of science occupy themselves with issues including the characteristics of science, how science and scientists function, the ontological and epistemological foundations of science, and the reciprocal role between science and society.

    D. Textbooks

    •Matthews, M.R.: 1994, Science Teaching: The Role of History and Philosophy of Science, New York, Routledge.

    •Hodson, D. (2008) Toward Scientific Literacy: A Teachers’ Guide to the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science. Rotterdam, Sense

    Note: Texts are seminal works in the field.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    The Philosophy and Nature of Science Readings List

    Fall 2011

    Rationales for Accurately Portraying the Nature of Science

    The Role and Character of the Nature of Science in Science Education by William F. McComas, Michael P. Clough and Hiya Almazroa. Chapter 1 in William F. McComas (Ed.) The Nature of Science in Science Education: Rationales and Strategies, Kluwer: The Netherlands.

    In Pursuit of Scientific Literacy: The Case for History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science. Chap 1 in Derek Hodson (ED) A Teacher’s Guide to The History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science.

    The Rapprochment Between History, Philosophy and Science Education Chap 1 in Micheal Matthews (ED) Science Teaching, The Role of History and Philosophy of Science.

    Why Compulsory Science Education Should Not Include Philosophy of Science. Davson-Galle. P. (2008) in Science & Education pp. 677-716

    What is Philosophy of Science? by E.D. Klemke, Robert Hollinger and A. David Kline. In E.D. Klemke, Robert Hollinger and A. David Kline (Eds.) Philosophy of Science, Prometheus: Buffalo, pp. 1-5))

    Philosophy of Science: Implications for Teacher Education by James T. Robinson, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 6(1):99-104.

    The Nature of Science by Shamos, M. (1995), The Myth of Scientific Literacy, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, Chapter 3, p. 45.

    The Nature of Science by National Research Council (1996). National Science Education Standards. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, pp. 6 and 21.

    NSTA Position Statement by McComas, W.F., Clough, M.P., Smith, M.U., Lederman, N.G., and Scott, E. (2000).

    Nature of Science NSTA Position Statement Adopted by the NSTA Board of Directors. http://www.nsta.org/handbook/ natureofscience.asp

    Research Supported Statements: The Nature of Science and Science Education collected by professor and students.

    Evolution, Education, and the Nature of Science and Scientific Inquiry

    by John Moore. In Zetterberg, J.P. (Ed.) (1983) Evolution Versus Creationism, Oryx Press: Phoenix, p. 3.

    Students’ Preconceptions About the Epistemology of Science by Alan G. Ryan and Glen S. Aikenhead (1992). Science Education, 76(6):559-580.

    Exploring Nature of Science Issues : Students’ Views and Curriculum Images Chap2 in Derek Hodson (ED) A Teacher’s Guide to The History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science.

    Longitudinal Understanding of the Nature of Science as Facilitated by an Introductory High School Biology Course by Michael P. Clough (1995). Proceedings of the Third International History, Philosophy, and Science Teaching Conference, pp. 212-221. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

    What is Science?

    The Principle Elements of the Nature of Science: Dispelling the Myths by William F. McComas (1998). Chapter 3 in William F. McComas (Ed.) The Nature of Science in Science Education: Rationales and Strategies, Kluwer: The Netherlands.

    The Traditional View Of Science: Recognizing The Myths, Chap 3 in Derek Hodson (ED) A

    Teacher’s Guide to The History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science.

    Constructivism and Science Education Chap 7 in Micheal Matthews (ED) Science

    Teaching, The Role of History and Philosophy of Science.

    An Essay for Educators: Epistemological Realism Really is Common Sense. Coburn, W. & Loving, C. (2008) Science & Education 17:425-447.

    Science and Its Origins by David C. Lindberg (1992). The Beginnings of Western Science, University of Chicago Press: Chicago, pp. 1-4.

    Sociocultural Approaches to Learning and Development: A Vygotskyian Framework, John-Stiener, V. & Mahn, H. Educational Psychologist, 31(3/4), 191-206.

    What Is Science? by Richard P. Feynman (1966). A speech to the National Science Teachers Association. Printed in The Physics Teacher, 7(6):313-320.

    Definitions of Science and Other Statements About Its Nature collected by George Cossman, William F. McComas and Michael P. Clough

    The Nature of Science: Understanding how the “game” of science is played by Michael P. Clough (2000). The Clearinghouse, 74(1):13-17.

    Science as a Human Enterprise by Van Allen, J.A. (1964). Current Science, February 3-7.

    Propositions Concerning the Nature of Science Relevant to Science Education Set 1 by Derek Hodson (1985).

    Philosophy of Science, Science and Science Education. Studies in Science Education, 12:25-57.

    Set 2 by Robert H. Ennis (1979). Research in Philosophy of Science Bearing on Science Education. In Asquith, P.D. & Kyburg, H.E. (1979) Current Research in Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Science Association: East Lansing.

    The Nature of Science: A Perspective from the Philosophy of Science. by Eflin, J.T., S. Glennan and G. Reisch (1999). Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 36(1):107-117.

    Science and Pseudoscience By Lakatos, Imir in Mc Grew, T; Alspector-Kelly, M.; & Allhoff, F. (EDS) Philosophy of Science An Historical Anthology (2009)

    Historically Profound Views about the Nature of Science Exploring Alternative Views of Science:The Ideas of Popper, Lakatos, and Kuhn Chap 3 in Derek Hodson (ED) A

    Teacher’s Guide to The History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science.

    Establishing Clarity in Defining Science

    Defining Science in a Multicultural World by William W. Cobern and Cathleen C. Loving,

    http://www.wmich.edu/slcsp/theoretical.htm

    Multicultural Perspectives in Science Education: One Prescription for Failure by Irving M. Clotz (1993). Phi Delta Kappan, 75(3):266-69.

    Science in Contrast to Traditional Belief Systems by Michael Matthews (1994). Science teaching; The role of history and philosophy of science. New York:Routledge, Chap 8

    Scientific Thinking Often Departs From Everyday Thinking: Implications For Teaching Science by Michael P. Clough

    Where Would You Direct Research Funds? by Michael P. Clough

    Two Aspects of Science by Norman Campbell (1953). What is Science? New York: Dover. Excerpts from pp. 1-29 The Value of Science by Richard P. Feynman. In Feynman’s What Do You Care What Other People Think? Norton: New York.

    The Cost Benefit Analysis of Pure Research by Medawar, P.B. (1973). Chapter 15 in Medawar, P.B. (1990) The Threat and the Glory: Reflections on Science and Scientists, HarperCollins, New York.

    The Pure Science by Medawar, P.B. (1973). Chapter 16 in Medawar, P.B. (1990) The Threat and the Glory: Reflections on Science and Scientists, HarperCollins, New York.

    Why Do Basic Research by National Institutes of Health (1984). NIH Publication Number 84-660, Author,

    Bethesda, Maryland Friction: Heat-Loving Bacterium Roils Two Worlds. Business, academia spar when product of basic research proves Practical by David I. Bednarek (1993). The Milwaukee Journal, May 9.

    Don't Tread on my Lab by Elmer-Dewitt, P. (1994). Time, 143(4), 44-45.

    Computers Go Bio by Levy, S. (1995) Newsweek, May 1, p. 63.

    Federal Support For Research in 1999 by R.M. Jones Basic Science, Applied Science and Technology: Similarities and Differences by Michael P. Clough

    New Technique For Discovering Medicines Takes Hold by Robert Langreth, Staff Reporter, The Wall Street Journal

    Some Ideas Worth Teaching About the Nature of Science

    No Universal Ahistorical Scientific Method Exists Science Processes by Fred N. Finley (1983). Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 20(1):47-54

    Beyond the Scientific Method by Michael H. Klapper (1995). The Science Teacher, 62(6):36-40

    Why is Science So Successful? by Michael P. Clough

    Experiment vs. Comparison by Mayr, E. (1982) In The Growth of Biological Thought. pp. 30-32.

    Scientists’ Different Ways of Knowing and Thinking The Position of Biology Within the Sciences by Mayr, E. (1982) In The Growth of Biological Thought. pp. 32-82..

    Scientific Knowledge Reveals Both a Sense of Discovery and Invention

    Orderliness in Nature by EmersonW. Shideler (1966). Believing and knowing: the meaning of truth in Biblical religion and in science, Iowa State University Press: Ames, p .

    Idealizations in Science and the Learning of Science by Matthews, M. (1994). Science teaching; The role of history and philosophy of science. Routledge: New York, NY, pp. 211-213

    Unnatural Thoughts by Lewis Wolpert (1992). The Unnatural Nature of Science. Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA, pp. 1-5, 16.

    Galileo’s Account of Pendulum Motion: An historical example of how scientific laws are idealizations of nature.by Matthews, M. (1994). Science teaching; The role of history and philosophy of science. Routledge: New York, NY, pp. 112-113, 116-118.

    The Unnatural Nature of Science: Implications for Science Education by Michael P. Clough (2000). Paper presented at the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science International Conference, Akron, Ohio, January 6-9.

    Public Science Differs From Private Science

    Is There Such A Thing as Scientific Objectivity? By Cole, K.C. (1985) Discover, September, pp. 98-99.

    Is the Scientific Paper a Fraud? by Medawar, P.B. (1963). Chapter 17 in Medawar, P.B. (1990) The Threat and the Glory: Reflections on Science and Scientists, HarperCollins, New York.

    In Defense of Robert Andrews Millikan by David Goodstein (2001). American Scientist, 89(1):54-60.

    The Practice of Science at the Edge of Knowledge

    By Grinnell, F. (2000). Electronic Chronicle of Higher Education, March 24.

    Laws Are Not Mature Theories

    The Laws of Science by Norman Campbell (1953). What is Science? New York: Dover. Excerpts from pp. 37-73

    The Explanation of Laws by Norman Campbell (1953). What is Science? New York: Dover. Excerpts from pp. 77-108

    Explanation by Bridgman, P.W. (1960). In The Logic of Modern Physics, Macmillan, New York, pp. 37-39.

    Types of Scientific Knowledge provided by Thomas Greenbowe Evidence of “top quark” would support basic picture of universe from News Services

    Disputed Comet Theory Shakes Scientific Foundationsby Aziz G@okdemir, The Daily Iowan

    Absolute Truth is Elusive

    Thoughts Regarding the Elusive Nature of Scientific Truth collected by professor

    For the First Time, You Can See Atoms by Hoffmann, R. (1993). American Scientist, January-February, p. 11-12.

    Realism or Instrumentalism: What Position for School Science? Chap 6 in Derek Hodson (ED) A

    Teacher’s Guide to The History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science.

    Causal Inference and the Language of Experimentation by Cook, T.D. and Campbell, T. (1979) in Quasi-

    Experimentation: Design & Analysis Issues for Field Settings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin

    Science is But One Way of Knowing

    Who's Afraid of The Big Bad Bang? by Overbye, D. (1993). Time, April 26, p. 74.

    The Science and Religion Wars by Singham, Mano (2000). Phi Delta Kappan, 81(6)425-32 February.

    Thoughts Regarding Science and Other Ways of Knowing collected by professor

    Diminish Students' Resistance to Evolution Education by Clough, M.P. (1994). The American Biology

    Teacher, 56(7), 409-415

    Scientists’ Different Ways of Knowing and Thinking

    The Position of Biology Within the Sciences by Mayr, E. (1982) In The Growth of Biological Thought. pp. 32-82..

    Effectively Teaching Students About The Nature of Science

    What Should a Curriculum that Promotes Scientific Literacy Look Like?

    Looking for a Balance in the Curriculum: Essential Elements in a Curriculum for Critical Scientific Literacy Chap 9 in Derek Hodson (ED) A Teacher’s Guide to The History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science.

    Assessing Students’ Ideas About the Nature of Science

    The Card Exchange: Introducing the Philosophy of Science by Cobern, W.W. and C.C. Loving (1998). Chapter 4 in W.F. McComas (Ed.) 1998 The Nature of Science in Science Education: Rationales and Strategies. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    The Development of a New Instrument: Views on Science-Technology-Society (VOSTS)

    by Aikenhead, G.S. and Ryan, A.G. (1992). Science Education, 76(5), 477-491.

    Decontextualized and Contextualized Nature of Science Instruction

    Avoiding De-Natured Science: Activities that Promote Under-standings of the Nature of Science

    by Lederman, N. and F. Abd-El-Khalick (1998). Chapter 5 in W.F. McComas (Ed.) 1998 The Nature of Science in Science Education: Rationales and Strategies. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    Science and Puzzle Solving by Michael P. Clough Strategies and Activities for Initiating and Maintaining Pressure on Students' Naive Views Concerning the Nature of Science. by Clough, M.P. (1997). Interchange 28(2-3):191-204.

    Integrating the Nature of Science with Student Teaching: Rationales and Strategies. by Clough, M.P. (1998). Chapter 11 in W.F. McComas (Ed.) 1998 The Nature of Science in Science Education: Rationales and Strategies. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    To Accurately Convey the Nature of Scientific Truth Means . . . compiled from several sources

    The Nature of Science: Understanding How the Game is Played by Clough, M. P. (2004) In Weld, J. (ED) The Game of Science Education. Pearson Education. Boston

    Effects of Contextualized & Decontextualized Nature of Science Instruction on Teachers’ Practices.

    by Clough, Michael P. and Olson, Joanne K. (2001). Paper presented at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) Conference, St. Louis, MO, March 25-28.

    The Importance of Language

    Some Implications of Language in Science Education by Munby, H. (1976). Science Education, 60(1), 115-124

    The Effects of Teachers' Language on Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science

    by Zeidler, D.L. & Lederman, N.G. (1989). Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 26(9), 771-783.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Participation (30 points) SOCS (15 points) Critical Analysis of a Historical Science Example. (Paper 20 points, presentation 5 points)Case Study of a Philosophical Argument about how Science Works (Paper 20 points, presentation 5 points)Case Study of NOSProject Activity Revision/Lesson Development (30 points) Research Areas (Paper 20 points, presentation 5 points)

    Grades will be assigned as follows:

    A 94-100

    A- 90-93

    B+ 87-89

    B 83-86

    B- 80-82

    C+ 77-79

    C 73-76

    C- 70-72

    D+ 67-69

    D 63-66

    D- 60-62

    Failing below 60

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    First Half:

    Week 1

    Rationales for Accurately Portraying the History, Philosophy and Nature of Science

    Week 2

    What is Science? Accurate and Inaccurate Representations in Varied Contexts

    Week 3 & 4

    Establishing Clarity in Defining Science

    Some Ideas Worth Teaching About the Nature of Science

    Public Science Differs From Private Science

    Laws Are Not Mature Theories

    Week 5&6

    Due: Case Study of a Philosophical Argument about how Science Works (Paper 20 points, presentation 5 points)

    Absolute Truth is Elusive

    Science is But One Way of Knowing

    Scientists’ Different Ways of Knowing and Thinking

    Second Half:

    Week 7 & 8

    Critical Analysis of a Historical Science Example. (Paper 20 points, presentation 5 points)

    Effectively Teaching Students About The Nature of Science

    Decontextualized and Contextualized Nature of Science Instruction

    Week 9

    Assessing Students’ Ideas About the Nature of Science

    Week 10

    Due: Case Study of NOS Research Areas (Paper 20 points, presentation 5 points) and Discussion

    Week 11 & 12

    The Importance of Language in Conveying the History, Philosophy and Nature of Science

    Week 13 - End of Course

    Due: Activity Revision/Lesson Development (30 points)

    Discuss and present Activity and Lesson Revision

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    this course follows all USF policies:

    (www.ugs.usf.edu/ugc/standard_policies.htm)

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Science Education


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.