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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - LAE6427

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2013-07-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 3/4/13 for MAT in Elem Ed Changes; GC apprvd 3/4/13. to USF Sys 3/5/13. to SCNS 4/22/13. Apprd eff 6/1/13. Nmbr 6420 apprd 6427


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2967 2012-10-11
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Childhood Education & Literacy Studies ED 1721
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Audra Parker 9743460 akparker@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    LAE 6427 Children's Literature: Teaching Literature Appreciation

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Children's Literature
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    Building on an appreciation for children’s literature students learn how to select quality literature for children and demonstrate instructional strategies for developing children’s engagement with literary texts, etc.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    25 student per semester

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Degree with an emphasis in Literacy Education with specific coursework in children’s literature. Adjunct faculty and doctoral students are required to have a Masters Degree with an emphasis in Literacy Education with knowledge of the field of children’s literature.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Identify and analyze text structures of children’s literature (e.g. narrative, information, fables, folktales, poetry, drama, media, etc.)

    • (CF 2: FLCS 2.1, 2,2, 6.1: IRA 2.2, 2.3: FRC, 1A3, 1A6)

    2. Identify and analyze literary elements across genres of children’s literature (e.g. narrative, information, fables, folktales, poetry, drama, media, etc.)

    • (CF 2: FLCS 2.1, 2.2: FRC 1A6)

    3. Identify and describe the elements of design that contribute to the art of the picture book.

    • (CF 2: FLCS 2.1, 2.2, 6.1: IRA 2.3: FRC 1A6)

    4. Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).

    • (CF 2: FLCS 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 6.1: IRA 2.3: FRC 1A4, 1A6)

    5. Identify and evaluate language use and vocabulary in children’s literature.

    • (CF 2: FLCS 2.2IRA 2.2: FRC 2F4)

    6. Identify and evaluate literature that represents diverse cultural, racial, social, religious, economic, and sexual identities and facilitate a learning environment in which differences and commonalities are valued.

    • (FEAP 2d: FLCS 2.3: CF 5: IRA 2.3, 4.1: FRC 1A4, 4.8)

    7. Compare and contrast the contributions and the compositional techniques of various authors, illustrators, poets, and playwrights.

    • (IRA 2.3 FLCS 2.1, 2.2, 2.3)

    8. Compare and contrast key details, content, and literary elements presented in history/social studies, science, and technical texts that vary in text complexity.

    • (FEAP 3b: FLCS 2.1, 2.2, 2.3: CF 2: IRA 2.3)

    9. Demonstrate effective read-aloud techniques (e.g., using words and phrases to supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song, speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud, highlighting illustrations as part of the meaning-making process).

    • (FEAP 2e: FLCS 2.4: IRA 2.2: ACEI 1: FRC 1E1, 1E2)

    10. Demonstrate effective read-aloud techniques for reading various text structures (e.g., picture books, chapter books, information texts, big books, and multimedia texts).

    • (FEAP 2e: IRA 2.2: FLCS 2.4, 6.1; ACEI 1: FRC 1E1)

    11. Demonstrate various practices to differentiate literature instruction (e.g., book talks, literature circles, partner work, and research/investigation groups).

    • (FEAP 1f: IRA 2.2: FLCS 2.4: ACEI 1)

    12. Demonstrate the ability to engage children in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners to explore literary content, elements, and personal responses.

    • (FEAP 3f: IRA 5.1, 5.4: FLCS 2.4: FRC 2A4, 2B2: ACEI 1, 2.1)

    13. Demonstrate differentiated literature instruction that reveals an understanding of the relationship between first- and second-language acquisition and literacy development.

    • (FEAP 2d: CF 5, 6: IRA 1.1, 2.2, 4.1: FLCS 2.4: FRC 1B5, 4.8: ACEI 1, 2.1, 3.2)

    14. Guided by evidence-based rationale, select and use quality traditional print, digital, and online resources to build an accessible, multilevel, and diverse classroom library that contains traditional print, digital, and online classroom materials.

    • (FEAP 2a: CF 2: IRA 2.2, 2.3, 4.1: FLCS 2.1, 2.4, 6.1, 6.3: FRC 1A6, 2G3: ACEI 2.1)

    B. Learning Outcomes

    a) Literary Analysis* (25%) (Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6: FEAP 2d: CF 2, 5: IRA 2.2, 2.3, 4.1: FLCS 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 6.1: FRC 1A3, 1A4,1A6, 2F4, 4.8)

    b) Classroom Library (5%) (Objectives 6, 7, 8, 14: FEAP 2a, 2d, 2e, 3b: CF 2, 5: IRA 2.2, 2.3, 4.1: FLCS 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 6.1, 6.3: FRC 2F4, 2G3: ACEI 1)

    c) Response Repository (10%) (Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 12: FEAP 3f: CF 2: IRA 2.2, 2.3, 5.1, 5.4:FLCS 2.4: ACEI 1, 2.1, 3.5: ESOL 11.1, 11.2, 17.1: FRC)

    d) Author/Illustrator/Poet Project (Optional) (10%) (Objectives 7, 11: FEAP 1f: IRA 2.2, 2.3: FLCS: 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4:ACEI 1, 2.1)

    e) Traditional Literature Text Comparison (20% option 1) (Objectives 1, 2, 6, 7, 11: FEAP 1f, 2d: CF 2. 5: IRA 2.2, 2.3, 3.3, 4.1: ACEI 1: FLCS 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4: FRC 1A3, 1A6)

    f) Diverse Portrayals in Children’s Literature (20% option 2) (Objectives 1, 2, 6, 7, 11: FEAP 1f, 2d: CF 2. 5: IRA 2.2, 2.3, 3.3, 4.1: ACEI 1: FLCS 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4: FRC 1A3, 1A6, 2B2)

    g) Read Alouds* (10%) (Objectives 9, 10, 13: FEAP 2e: IRA 2.2: FLCS: 2.1, 2.4, 6.1: ACEI 1: FRC 1E1, 1E2)

    h) Book Talks* (5%) (Objectives 11, 13: FEAP 1f, 2d: CF 5, 6: IRA 1.1, 2.2, 4.1: FLCS 2.4: ACEI 1, 2.1, 3.2: FRC 1B5, 2B3, 4.8)

    i) Literature Discussion Groups* (5%) (Objectives 11, 12: FEAP 1f, 3f: IRA 2.2, 5.1, 5.4: FLCS: 2.4: ACEI 1, 2.1: FRC 1A6, 2G3)

    C. Major Topics

    Week 1 Introduction

    • Overview of the Genres of Children’s Literature

    • Developing Appreciation of Children’s Literature

    o Read-aloud techniques

    o Designing effective classroom spaces

    o Developing a classroom library

    o Modeling a literate life

    o Fostering multimodality in response to literature

    o Promoting family literacyo

    Week 2 Libraries, Librarians, & Information Literacy

    o Learning about the library

    o Finding children’s literature

    o Working with librarians

    o Locating library resources

    o Joining library & literature organizations

    • Selecting and Evaluating Children’s Literature

    o Identifying literary elements

    o Determining basic text structures across genres

    o Identifying and evaluating authorial devices

    • Meeting Authors and Illustrators

    o Newbery Award Winners

    o Caldecott Award Winners

    o Coretta Scott King Award Winners

    o Pura Belpre Award Winners

    o Best sellers

    o Sunshine State Young Readers

    Week 3 • Reading and Responding to Literature

    o Demonstrating effective read-aloud techniques

    o Demonstrating Picture Walks

    o Creating and modeling Book Talks

    o Organizing Book Clubs

    o Leading Book Discussions

    o Engaging students’ responses to texts through Multimodal Activities

    o Using Media tools to encourage response

    Week 4 Picture Books

    o Identifying elements and structures of simple Informational Texts

     Beginning Books

     Concept Books

     Predictable Stories

    o Modeling strategies for reading simple informational texts

     Demonstrating effective read-aloud techniques

     Demonstrating Picture Walks

     Demonstrating simple content reading strategies

    Week 5 Picture Books

    o Identifying elements and structures of Narrative Stories

     Identifying simple plot structures

     Understanding character development through images and text

    o Modeling strategies for reading and responding to Narrative Stories

     Building children’s concept of story through read-alouds

     Demonstrating how to retell stories using text details

     Scaffolding children’s ability to fluently read increasingly complex texts through dramatic activities

     Encouraging students to read widely by creating and modeling Book Talks

    Week 6 Picture Books

    o Identifying elements and structures of more complex Narrative Stories

     Identifying complex plot structures

     Understanding character development through dialogue and plot

     Identifying elements of visual images

    o Modeling strategies for reading and responding to Narrative Stories

     Scaffolding children’s ability to read with prosody

     Demonstrating strategies for reading multimedia texts

     Developing response activities that encourage multimodality through drama

    Week 7 Poetry

    o Identifying elements and structures of Poetry

     Identifying forms of poetry

     Identifying literary devices

    o Modeling strategies for reading and responding to Poetry

     Demonstrating effective read-aloud techniques

     Engaging students’ responses to poetry through Multimodal Activities

     Using Media tools to encourage response

     Develop lessons that explore language and vocabulary through word play

     Demonstrating strategies for fostering oral language development through choral reading

    Week 8 Traditional Literature

    o Identifying elements and structures of Traditional Literature

     Fairy Tales

     Folktales

     Drama

     Identifying linguistic differences across global children’s literature texts

    o Modeling strategies for reading and responding to Traditional Literature

     Demonstrate effective oral storytelling techniques

     Fostering oral language development through book clubs

     Demonstrate strategies for comparing and contrasting stories

    Week 9 Fantasy

    o Identifying elements and structures of Fantasy Chapter Books

     Identifying complex plot structures

     Understanding complicated character development

     Summarizing and citing text sources

    o Modeling strategies for reading and responding to Fantasy

     Develop methods for organizing Book Clubs

     Demonstrate the ability to lead a Book Discussion

     Demonstrate strategies for analyzing plot structures

     Develop lessons that engage students’ responses to texts through Multimodal Activities

    Week 10 Historical Fiction

    o Identifying elements and structures of Historical Fiction

     Identifying complex plot structures

     Understanding complicated character development

     Summarizing text and citing text sources

    o Modeling strategies for reading and responding to Historical Fiction

     Develop methods for organizing Book Clubs

     Demonstrate the ability to lead a Book Discussion

     Demonstrate strategies for analyzing historical text structures

     Develop lessons that develop students’ Global Perspectives

     Demonstrating strategies for comparing and contrasting key details, content, and literary elements in texts

    Week 11 Contemporary Realistic Fiction

    o Identifying elements and structures of Contemporary Fiction

     Identifying Complex Plot Structures

     Understanding Character Development

     Developing Global Perspectives

     Understanding Censorship

    o Modeling strategies for reading and responding to Biographies

     Develop methods for organizing Book Clubs

     Demonstrate the ability to lead a Book Discussion

     Demonstrate strategies for analyzing text structures

     Demonstrating strategies for comparing and contrasting key details, content, and literary elements in texts

    Week 12 Biography/Autobiography

    o Identifying elements and structures of Biographies

     Identifying Complex Plot Structures

     Understanding Character Development

    o Modeling strategies for reading and responding to Contemporary Realistic Fiction

     Develop methods for organizing Book Clubs

     Demonstrate the ability to lead a Book Discussion

     Demonstrate strategies for analyzing narrative text structures

     Demonstrate strategies for reading multimodal texts (e.g., graphic novels, fanfiction)

     Develop lessons that develop students’ Global Perspectives

     Demonstrating strategies for comparing and contrasting key details, content, and literary elements in texts

     Engaging students’ responses to texts through Multimodal Activities

     Using Media tools to encourage response

    Week 13 Picture Books (Information/Non-fiction/Increasing Complexity)

    o Identifying elements and structures of more complex Informational Texts

     Identifying Elements of Non-fiction

     Identifying Elements of Visual Design

     Identifying Curricular concepts

    o Modeling strategies for reading simple informational texts

     Demonstrating effective read-aloud techniques

     Demonstrating Picture/Text Walks

     Demonstrating content area reading strategies

     Demonstrating strategies for Reading Multimedia Texts

     Demonstrate strategies for searching for information

    Week 14 Picture Books (Information/Non-fiction/Increasing Complexity)

    o Identifying elements and structures of more complex Informational Texts

     Identifying Elements of Non-fiction

     Identifying Elements of Visual Design

     Identifying Curricular concepts

    o Modeling strategies for reading simple informational texts

     Demonstrating effective read-aloud techniques

     Demonstrating Picture/Text Walks

     Demonstrating content area reading strategies

     Demonstrating strategies for Reading Multimedia Texts

     Demonstrate strategies for searching for information

    Week 15 Planning a Literature Program

    o Evaluating a Classroom Library

    o Evaluating Classic texts

    o Learning from Authors/Illustrators/Poets

    o Demonstrating how to lead Authors’ Craft Discussions

    Week 16 Final exam

    D. Textbooks

    Kiefer, B.Z. (2010). Charlotte Huck’s children’s literature (10th Ed.). Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill. ISBN-10: 0073378569 | ISBN-13: 978-0073378565

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Optional Readings

    Al-Hazza, T. C. and Bucher, K. T. (2008), Building Arab Americans' Cultural Identity and Acceptance With Children's Literature. The Reading Teacher, 62: 210–219. doi: 10.1598/RT.62.3.3

    Block, C. C. and Israel, S. E. (2004), The ABFLCS of Performing Highly Effective Think-Alouds. The Reading Teacher, 58: 154–167. doi: 10.1598/RT.58.2.4

    Mills, H. and Jennings, L. (2011), Talking About Talk: Recaiming the Value and Power of Literature Circles. The Reading Teacher, 64: 590–598. doi: 10.1598/RT.64.8.4

    O'Neil, K. E. (2011), Reading Pictures: Developing Visual Literacy for Greater Comprehension. The Reading Teacher, 65: 214–223. doi: 10.1002/TRTR.01026

    Risko, V. J., Walker-Dalhouse, D., Bridges, E. S. and Wilson, A. (2011), Drawing on Text Features for Reading Comprehension and Composing. The Reading Teacher, 64: 376–378. doi: 10.1598/RT.64.5.12

    Serafini, F. (2011), Creating Space for Children's Literature. The Reading Teacher, 65: 30–34. doi: 10.1598/RT.65.1.4

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    a)Literary Analysis (25%) (Critical Task)

    b)Classroom Library Wish List (5%)

    c)Response Repository (10%)

    d)Author/Illustrator/Poet Project (Optional Assignment)

    e)Traditional Literature Text Comparison

    f)Read Alouds (Modeling Reading Strategies) (10%)

    g)Books Talks (5%)

    i)Literature Discussion Groups/Book Clubs (5%)

    Final Exam (10%) This is a comprehensive exam that covers the information from class lectures, presentations, and demonstrations.

    Plus/Minus Grading: A minimum grade of C- is required.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    A+ = 98-100 B+ = 90-91 C+ = 80-81

    A = 95-97 B = 85-89 C = 75-79

    A- = 92-94 B- = 82-84 C- = 72-74

    D = 65-69 D+ = 70-71 D- = 62-64

    F = 0-61

    H. Attendance Policy

    ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY. PROMPTNESS IS EXPECTED AND REQUIRED. ACTIVE PARTICIPATION AND PREPARATION FOR CLASS ARE ESSENTIAL. ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE TURNED IN ON TIME. There are many legitimate reasons for absences, tardies, and late work (e.g., family emergencies, illness, car trouble, etc.). If you miss class, arrive late, or leave early, I will assume that your reasons are legitimate. Therefore, I do not “excuse” or accept doctor’s notes for absences, tardies, or late work for any reason.

    Consistent and complete attendance is necessary to learn all of the information covered in the course and to observe modeled instructional strategies. More than one absence or two tardies (for any reason) will lower your participation grade according to the following breakdown.

    •EACH ABSENCE (for any reason) will lower your course grade by 10% because you will miss literature activities and modeled instructional strategies (see weekly schedule). If you miss class during any scheduled field experience, your grade will be lowered by 20%.

    •EACH TARDY/LEAVE EARLY (for any reason) will lower your course grade by 5% because you will miss demonstrations, class activities, or reading strategies. Any tardy or early departure over 30 minutes is considered an absence.

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    • All of your work, including online assignments, must be submitted by the due date. Any late work for any reason will have a reduced grade. There are no “free” late work credits.

    • EACH LATE ASSIGNMENT (for any reason) will lower your GRADE ON THE ASSIGNMENT by a letter grade for each day that it is late. IF you must turn in a late assignment, I will not accept it more than one week past its original due date.

    • EACH TIME YOU DEMONSTRATE A LACK OF PARTICIPATION IN CLASS OR LACK OF PREPARATION FOR CLASS (for any reason) your grade will be lowered by 5%. This includes, but is not limited to, checking email, texting, searching the Internet, talking phone calls, etc.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MAT Elementary Education


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    None



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.