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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EEX7425

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2012-06-15
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 4/2/12; Learning outcomes need write; faculty emailed 4/11/12. upd 5/4/12. Appd 5/7/12. to USF 5/15/12; to SCNS 5/23/12. Appd eff 6/1/12


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2679 2011-11-22
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Special Education ED 172800
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Jeannie Kleinhammer-Tramill 8139743410 pjkleinhamme@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EEX 7425 Special Education Leadership Studies

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? Y
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    1-2 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    SPED Leadership Studies
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    Introduction to doctoral studies in the Department of Special Education. Discussion forum for new students, mentoring and support.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to doctoral studies in the Department of Special Education. The course will serve as a forum for discussions of the roles and responsibilities of doctoral students and will provide students with mentoring and support as they plan their required Program of Study. Presently, there is no other course that would meet this particular curricular need in the Ph.D. Special Educaton program. Lastly, this course reflects our new C & I concentration.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 3 or more times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Doctorate


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Students will monitor their developmental progress as doctoral students.

    2. Students will identify key milestones in their doctoral program and complete all planning activities and tasks necessary to complete these milestones.

    3. Students will describe resources available for personal and scholarly support at the University of South Florida including the USF Libraries, USF student mental health services, USF health services, USF Student Support Services, USF Diversity Services, and the College of Education’s resources for instructional technology.

    4. Students will engage in scholarly discussions of current research issues.

    5. Students will describe current research and program development efforts within the Department of Special Education and the College of Education at USF.

    6. Students will engage in Communities of Practice to provide mutual and reciprocal support to cohort members in developing skills of inquiry, critical analysis and critical theorizing, and methodological fluency, as well as in fulfilling applied, experiential requirements of the doctoral program.

    7. Students will demonstrate dispositions (attitudes, approaches to problem-solving, respect for the perspectives of others) necessary to engage in collaborative research, supervision of other professionals, and preparation of new generations of educators.

    1. Students will examine trends, issues, and controversies in the field of special education and articulate the added value of special education services for students with disabilities.

    2. Students will engage examine and document their developmental progress in formulating a scholarly identity and document their progress as future scholars who will contribute to improvement of special education services.

    3. Students review literature related to their area(s) of concentration in preparation for qualifying examinations.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Evaluation of Student Outcomes

    Semester 1

    1. Class Participation

    Participation as a scholar: 20% of grade

    Students should be prepared to participate in class discussions (online and/or face-to-face) and to engage in relevant discussions of course topics and readings. Consistent with expectations for doctoral students, class participation should consist of comments that are grounded in source material that can be shared with the class. Individual student comments should be limited to 2-3 minutes to ensure time for coverage of core content and should have demonstrated relevance to the topic at hand.

    Students are expected to demonstrate interpersonal and communication skills that are appropriate for professional leadership personnel. Conversations that are not directly related to course content and that are not directed to the entire group should be carried out outside of the classroom. Students who engage in unrelated or private conversations during class time or whose cell phones ring during class time will be asked to leave the room.

    2. Personal Change Blog

    By applying for the USF Special Education doctoral program, you have made a commitment toward personal and professional change. For this assignment, you will maintain a blog in which you record your aspirations, long-term goals, and short term objectives related to your own professional growth. You should enter your reflections on your progress at least weekly throughout the course. Your reflections can consist of internal evidence (e.g., internal evidence might range from feelings of increased comfort or confidence when you carry out particularly difficult tasks, feelings of success or discouragement, insights as to what you might do differently in particular situations, new things you have learned, and/or plans for steps you think might lead to one of your personal objectives.) When appropriate, you may also wish to describe external evidence of your progress, whether positive or negative (e.g., external evidence might consist of criticism from the parent of one of your students, a commendation from your supervisor or professor, and/or feedback on papers or other class products.) This will be an open blog, so that you can read and respond to what others have posted.

    3. Readings:

    Guest speakers will provide readings and/or products that reflect their research and work. These will be available online, the week before class. Each student is expected to complete all of the readings or products provided by the guest speaker and to discuss the readings in class interactions, as appropriate, or in the personal blog.

    Semester 2

    1. Use the Discussion board section of Blackboard to identify current trends, issues, challenges, and ideas about the future of special education. You should each initiate a new forum at least weekly focused on one trend/issue in special education that is of national or at least statewide concern. You should respond to each new post from your classmates and instructor, and respond to at least three posts from your classmates. Your posts should provide substantive information on each topic rather than your opinions on the topic. (You may express opinions, but support them with information from the scholarly literature or other credible sources.)

    2. Use the Blog section of Blackboard to post weekly updates on your reflections about your experiences in the doctoral program as well as specific steps you are taking to prepare for qualifying exams.

    3. Develop a Curriculum Vitae that lists your personal information, professional experience, courses taught, publications, grants, presentations, participation and leadership roles in professional organizations. Post your Curriculum Vitae under assignments. (If you have already developed a Vita, this is a good time to update it!)

    4. Identify three current (2008 or more recent) articles each week from the scholarly literature. You should select the articles based on relevance to your likely qualifying exam topics. Provide a brief (paragraph) synopsis of each article and submit on the Assignments section of Blackboard.

    5. Develop a self-evaluation portfolio that provides a synthesis of self-evaluative information about you. Provide evidence of your progress in the areas of teaching, research, and service (if applicable). You may use student evaluations from courses that you have taught or co-taught, and you may include exemplary papers that you have written, including any papers that you have published. You may want to consider the following questions in developing your self-evaluation:

    (1) Who are you as a professional? What are your beliefs, interests, convictions, areas of knowledge and areas of need for growth? What is your epistemological position, and what is your philosophy regarding disability and marginalized students?

    (2) What prior experiences do you bring to your doctoral work, and how do they contribute to who you are?

    (3) What do you hope to contribute to the field when you complete your doctorate? How do you see yourself contributing to the growth of knowledge in the field and providing leadership in the preparation of new generations of educators?

    (4) What is your program of study and who is on your committee? How does your selection of a committee reflect your aspirations for growth as a scholar? How does your program of study reflect your aspirations for growth as a scholar, and how do you feel that it will inform your future role as a scholar and leader in the field?

    (5) What scholarship, teaching, and service to the community, the University, or the field can you document? What papers have you published/written/presented at professional conferences? What grants have you submitted?

    (6) How do you envision your research, teaching, and service to be related? How do each of these activities inform the other?

    (7) How do you evaluate your work to date in the areas of teaching, research, and service?

    (8) How do you evaluate your work to date in terms of your overall vision/aspirations for your contributions to the field as a scholar?

    C. Major Topics

    Course Topics:

    A. Planning your doctoral program.

    1. Advisement and selection of the committee

    2. Program overview and planning

    B. Required activities for doctoral students.

    1. Special Education Doctoral Program Requirements Checklist

    2. Documentation of progress in the doctoral program

    C. University resources to support doctoral study

    1. USF Libraries

    2. Writing Lab

    3. Mental health and health services

    4. Student support services

    D. Faculty research interests and opportunities for involvement

    1. Special Education faculty research

    2. Grants and other ongoing research projects

    E. Student scholarship

    1. Developing identity as a scholar

    2. Mentored and independent student scholarship

    3. Internship opportunities

    F. Identify current trends, issues, challenges, and ideas about the future of special education.

    D. Textbooks

    None. Online readings are used.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Grading Criteria:

    Semester 1

    1. Participation – 50% of possible grade

    2. Personal change blog – 20% of possible grade

    3. Readings – 30% of possible grade

    Semester 2

    1. Synthesis of trends and issues in special education and literature relevant to Individual qualifying examinations –30% of grade

    2. Development and presentation of final portfolio – 50% of grade

    3. Weekly blog and participation in critical analyses of all presentations – 20% of grade

    Grading scale:

    A – 90% or above

    B - 80% - 89%

    C - 70%-79%

    Because of the participatory nature of this class, incompletes will not be given.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Content Outline:

    A. Planning your doctoral program.

    1. Advisement and selection of the committee

    2. Program overview and planning

    B. Required activities for doctoral students.

    1. Special Education Doctoral Program Requirements Checklist

    2. Documentation of progress in the doctoral program

    C. University resources to support doctoral study

    1. USF Libraries

    2. Writing Lab

    3. Mental health and health services

    4. Student support services

    D. Faculty research interests and opportunities for involvement

    1. Special Education faculty research

    2. Grants and other ongoing research projects

    E. Student scholarship

    1. Developing identity as a scholar

    2. Mentored and independent student scholarship

    3. Internship opportunities

    F. Identify current trends, issues, challenges, and ideas about the future of special education.

    Tentative Weekly Schedule

    Semester 1

    Class 1: Choosing an Advisor, Selecting a Committee, Planning Your Program

    Class 2-3: Expectations of Doctoral Students: Program Requirements Checklist, Involvement in Research and Teaching

    Class 4: USF Libraries

    Class 5-13: Faculty Research Interests

    Class 14: Developing your Identity as a Scholar

    Class 15: Documenting your progress

    Semester 2

    Class 1: Current trends and issues in the field of special education.

    Class 2: What’s special about special education? What value does it add for individuals with disabilities and others? How do you position yourself as a critical scholar within a conservative, changing, and/or contested field?

    Class 3: Who are you as a professional? Expressing your scholarly identity in relationship to teaching, research, and service.

    Class 4: Reflections on your preparation as a scholar and preparing for the qualifying examination.

    Class 5: Accountability for documenting progress in teaching, research, and service.

    Class 6: Individual presentations on literature relevant to individual qualifying exams and critiques

    Class 7: Individual presentations on literature relevant to individual qualifying exams and critiques

    Class 8: Individual presentations on literature relevant to individual qualifying exams and critiques

    Class 9: Individual presentations of documentation related to teaching, research, and service and critiques

    Class 10: Individual presentations of documentation related to teaching, research, and service and critiques

    Class 11: Individual presentations of documentation related to teaching, research, and service and critiques

    Class 12: Individual presentations of documentation related to teaching, research, and service and critiques

    Class 13: Individual presentations of documentation related to teaching, research, and service and critiques

    Class 14: Developmental progress toward a scholarly identity in professional roles

    Class 15: Responsibilities and expectations of leaders in the field

    Semester 1

    1. Participation – 50% of possible grade

    2. Personal change blog – 20% of possible grade

    3. Readings – 30% of possible grade

    Semester 2

    1. Synthesis of trends and issues in special education and literature relevant to

    Individual qualifying examinations – 30% of grade

    2. Development and presentation of final portfolio – 50% of grade

    3. Weekly blog and participation in critical analyses of all presentations – 20% of grade

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    All assignments are expected to be completed by the assigned due date. In cases of emergency, it is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to see if alternative arrangements may be made. Academic Dishonesty: Plagiarism is defined as "literary theft" and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public-at-large, must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as ones own, segments or the total of another persons work. Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the "F" shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student a grade of "F" of "FF" (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course. Detection of plagiarism: It is very important to state in your syllabus that you plan to submit student assignments to SafeAssignment.com in order to detect plagiarism. This will give you the legal right to submit student assignments to SafeAssignment.com. If you plan to submit to Safe Assignment, use the statement below: The University of South Florida has an account with an automated plagiarism detection service which allows instructors to submit student assignments to be checked for plagiarism. I reserve the right to 1) request that assignments be submitted to me as electronic files and 2) electronically submit to SafeAssignment.com, or 3) ask students to submit their assignments to SafeAssignment.com through myUSF. Assignments are compared automatically with a database of journal articles, web articles, and previously submitted papers. The instructor receives a report showing exactly how a student’s paper was plagiarized.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    PH.D. Program Curriculum and Instruction-Special Education


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    None



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.