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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - HUM6814

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2012-08-29
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC chair 5/4/12. for Am Studies Prog. GC Appd 5/7/12. to USF 5/15/12. to SCNS 5/23/12. Appd effective 8/1/12. Number 6805 chnaged to 6814


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2656 2011-11-03
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Humanities and Cultural Studies AS 1237
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Daniel Belgrad 8139749388 dbelgrad@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    HUM 6814 Introduction to Graduate Study

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Intro to Graduate Study
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    none.

    Corequisites

    none.

    Course Description

    An introduction to graduate study in humanities and cultural studies. This course introduces incoming graduate students to the research interests of the departmental faculty and the program emphases, including textual analysis and analytical writing.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course will be required for all first semester graduate students in the three Master's degree programs in the department of Humanities and Cultural Studies: MLA-FLM, MLA-HTS, and MA AMS. It will introduce incoming students to the research interests of the department faculty and jump-start their own research work.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 1 time

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    PhD required to teach course.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    (1) To begin developing graduate-level skills in textual analysis and analytical writing

    (2)To produce several short pieces of analytical writing

    (3) To familiarize students with the nature of graduate work, USF as a graduate research university, and the specifics of the department's programs.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Students completing this course will demonstrate :

    (1) an ability to analyze cultural texts at an acceptable level of complexity for graduate study

    (2) an ability to produce short analytical essays using interdisciplinary humanities and cultural studies methodology

    (3) familiarity with the research agendas of the graduate faculty in the department of Humanities and Cultural Studies

    C. Major Topics

    textual analysis, analytical writing, research methodology

    D. Textbooks

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    (1) George Lipsitz, Listening to Learn and Learning to Listen: Popular Culture, Cultural Theory, and American Studies, American Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1990), pp. 615-636;

    (2) Simon During excerpts from Cultural Studies

    (3) Ernest Sanders, Form and Content in the Finale of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, The Musical Quarterly 50, No. 1 (Jan., 1964): 59-76 .

    (4) Maynard Solomon, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: A Search for Order, 19th-Century Music 10, no. 1 (Summer, 1986): 3-23.

    (5) Caryl Clark, Forging Identity: Beethoven's "Ode" as European Anthem, Critical Inquiry 23, No. 4 (Summer, 1997): 789-807.

    (6) Galia Hanoch-Roe, “Beethoven's "Ninth": An 'Ode to Choice' as Presented in Stanley Kubrick's "A Clockwork Orange" International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music 33, No. 2 (Dec., 2002), 171-179.

    (7) Arthur Danto, “The Artworld,” The Journal of Philosophy 61, no. 19 (1964): 571-584.

    (8) Jennifer Dyer, The Metaphysics of the Mundane: Understanding Andy Warhol's Serial Imagery, Artibus et Historiae Vol. 25, No. 49 (2004): 33-47.

    (9) David Cowart and Bradford R. Collins, “Through the Looking-Glass: Reading Warhol's Superman” American Imago, 53, no. 2 (Summer 1996): 107-137.

    (10) Marc Siegel, Doing It for Andy, Art Journal, Vol. 62, No. 1 (Spring, 2003): 6-13.

    (11) Roberta Pearson and Robert Stam, "Hitchcock'sRear Window: Reflexivity and the

    Critique of Voyeurism," Enclitic, no. 7 (Spring, 1983): 136-45.

    (12) Toles, George. Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window as Critical Allegory, boundary 2, Vol. 16, No. 2/3 (Winter - Spring, 1989), 225-245.

    (13) Lawrence Howe, “Through the Looking Glass: Reflexivity, Reciprocality, and Defenestration in Hitchcock's Rear Window,” College Literature 35, no. 1 (Winter 2008): 16-37.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Description of Assignments:

    Participation/Attendance (10%): Includes On-line Postings and class attendance/discussion.

    Regular Online Postings (calculated with Participation/Attendance): Five times during the semester (due dates are marked on the schedule below) you will post short responses to class readings and materials on Blackboard. I will set up folders in the “Discussion” section of the website. I will provide a prompt question for the first few postings but after that you are responsible for generating the topic of your post. Postings are short and informal, between 200 and 400 words.

    In-class Presentation of Readings (10%)

    4 Research and Writing Assignments (including revisions) (20% each):

    Assignment 1: The first essay is a literature review. First, choose one of the artistic texts covered in class: Beethoven’s 9th, Warhol’s paintings (choose a single image or “series”), or the film Rear Window. Research as thoroughly as you can all the academic literature on the topic. Write a synthetic account of your research that critically appraises the extant writing on your artifact/text. Try to extract from your research the primary themes, topic, and scholarly preoccupations of the literature. What do scholars focus on when writing about this artifact/object? What ideas or aspects seem to most preoccupy or trouble or fascinate researchers? This is not a blow-by-blow summary of each account you find but a synthesis that reflects your own knowledge and critical engagement.

    Assignment 2: Consider again the artifact/object from Essay 1. Construct a preliminary thesis that offers a new interpretation. Use that thesis to build a 200-250 word abstract that summarizes the specific details of your “project.”

    Assignment 3: Drawing on the analytical tools discussed in Writing Analytically, write a 1200-1500 word essay that provides a new interpretation on your artifact or object.

    Assignment 4: A revision, based on workshop comments, of your analytical essay (Assignment 3).

    Grading Policies

    Course assignments and the final grade will be given as a +/- or straight letter grade. College policy states that the S/U option must be agreed to during the first three weeks of the semester. Incomplete grades should only be granted when, due to circumstances beyond the student’s control, only a small portion of the required work remains undone and the student is otherwise passing the course.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Topics: nature and practice of analysis, research resources, abstracts & bibliographies, literature reviews, methodology statements, thesis statements, essay writing.

    Class 1 (Wed., August 24): Intro

    Class 2 (August 31): What Is Cultural Studies?; Online Posting

    (1) George Lipsitz, Listening to Learn and Learning to Listen: Popular Culture, Cultural Theory, and American Studies, American Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1990), pp. 615-636;

    (2) Simon During excerpts from Cultural Studies

    Class 3 (Sept. 7): Prof. Amy Rust; The Analytical Object – Beethoven’s 9th Symphony; Online Posting

    (1) Writing Analytically, Chapters 1-4

    (2) Beethoven’s 9th Symphony – listen with online and print guides; begin (and bring to class) a preliminary analysis using one methods from the “analytical toolkit.”

    Class 4 (Sept. 14): Prof. David Underwood; The Analytical Object – Beethoven’s 9th Symphony; Online Posting

    (1) Writing Analytically, Chapters 5-7

    (2) Ernest Sanders, Form and Content in the Finale of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, The Musical Quarterly 50, No. 1 (Jan., 1964): 59-76 .

    (3) Maynard Solomon, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony: A Search for Order, 19th-Century Music 10, no. 1 (Summer, 1986): 3-23.

    Class 5 (Sept. 21): Prof. Sara Dykins Callahan; Assignment 1 Due

    (1) Writing Analytically, Chapter 8-11

    (2) Caryl Clark, Forging Identity: Beethoven's "Ode" as European Anthem, Critical Inquiry 23, No. 4 (Summer, 1997): 789-807.

    (3) Galia Hanoch-Roe, “Beethoven's "Ninth": An 'Ode to Choice' as Presented in Stanley Kubrick's "A Clockwork Orange" International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music 33, No. 2 (Dec., 2002), 171-179.

    Class 6 (Sept. 28): Prof. Dan Belgrad; Workshopping Literature Reviews (Assignment 1)

    The class will exchange their lit. reviews with one another. In class you will offer your critiques of each other’s work.

    Class 7 (Oct. 5): Annette Cozzi; The Analytical Object – Andy Warhol; Online Posting

    (1) Arthur Danto, “The Artworld,” The Journal of Philosophy 61, no. 19 (1964): 571-584.

    (2) Jennifer Dyer, The Metaphysics of the Mundane: Understanding Andy Warhol's Serial Imagery, Artibus et Historiae Vol. 25, No. 49 (2004): 33-47.

    Class 8 (Oct. 12): Rachel Dubrofsky; Warhol cont.; Assignment 2 Due

    (1) David Cowart and Bradford R. Collins, “Through the Looking-Glass: Reading Warhol's Superman” American Imago, 53, no. 2 (Summer 1996): 107-137.

    (2) Marc Siegel, Doing It for Andy, Art Journal, Vol. 62, No. 1 (Spring, 2003): 6-13.

    Class 9 (Oct. 19): Workshopping Theses and Abstracts (Assignment 2)

    The class will exchange their abstracts with one another. In class you will offer your critiques of each other’s work.

    Class 10 (Oct. 26): Garnet Butchart; film: Rear Window, dir. Hitchcock

    (1) Writing Analytically, 9-12

    Class 11 (Nov. 2): Michael LeVan; Online Posting

    (1) Writing Analytically, 13-16

    (2) Roberta Pearson and Robert Stam, "Hitchcock'sRear Window: Reflexivity and the

    Critique of Voyeurism," Enclitic, no. 7 (Spring, 1983): 136-45.

    Class 12 (Nov. 9): Rear Window (cont.) Assignment 3 Due

    (1) Writing Analytically, 17-19

    (2) Toles, George. Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window as Critical Allegory, boundary 2, Vol. 16, No. 2/3 (Winter - Spring, 1989), 225-245.

    (3) Lawrence Howe, “Through the Looking Glass: Reflexivity, Reciprocality, and Defenestration in Hitchcock's Rear Window,” College Literature 35, no. 1 (Winter 2008): 16-37.

    Class 13 (Nov. 16): Workshopping Assignments: Analytical Essay

    The class will exchange their analytical essays with one another. In class you will offer your critiques of each other’s work.

    Class 14 (Nov. 23): Workshopping Assignments: Analytical Essay (cont.)

    Class 15 (Nov. 30) Wrap-up and Conclusion; Assignment 4 Due

    Finals Week (Dec. 7)

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Late assignments will be lowered by one full letter grade for every day late. There are only a few exceptions to this rule:

    Reasonable accommodations will be made for students with disabilities, provided a current Memorandum of Accommodations, from the Office of Student Disability Services, is brought to the instructor by the end of the second week of classes.

    Reasonable accommodations will be made in the case of religious holidays. Students who anticipate the necessity of being absent from class due to the observation of a major religious observance must provide notice of the date(s) to the instructor, in writing, by the second class meeting.

    In the case of serious outside medical or personal problems, I will try to make accommodations. However, the evaluation of general medical and personal excuses is at my discretion. Please note: If you foresee that you will have difficulty attending class, meeting any of the deadlines, or taking any of the exams because of other time commitments (job, family, etc.), I strongly suggest you reconsider enrolling in the class.

    Academic Integrity and Dishonesty

    To avoid the appearance of plagiarism you must consistently use a recognized citation system (MLS, Chicago, etc.) Direct quotations from sources must be identified by quotation marks and properly cited. Failure to do this constitutes academic dishonesty and may result in a FF grade for the course. For more information please consult: . An online tutorial on plagiarism is available at .

    The University of South Florida has an account with an automated plagiarism detection service that allows instructors to submit student assignments to be checked for plagiarism. I reserve the right to submit assignments to this detection system. Assignments are compared automatically with a huge database of journal articles, web articles, and previously submitted papers. The instructor receives a report showing exactly how a student’s paper was plagiarized. The instructor, not the computer, makes the final determination as to plagiarism.

    It is not permissible to sell either written or audiotape notes for this course.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Master of Liberal Arts -- Humanities concentration


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    MLA-FLM and AMS (both are within the department of HCS)



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.