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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - ANG6585

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2014-10-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/6/13; pending revision to objectives. Faculty emailed 5/10/13; course put in queue for revision. Ready to review. GC apprd 8/5/13. to USF Sys. To SCNS 8/23/13. Apprd Effective 10/1/14


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2631 2011-10-04
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Anthropology AS 120500000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Heide Castaneda 8130742138 hcastaneda@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    ANG 6585 Theories In Applied Bioanthropology

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable? N
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) -
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Theories in bioanthro
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    none

    Corequisites

    none

    Course Description

    A survey of the major theoretical frameworks and quantitative and qualitative methodologies commonly used in biological anthropology research.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Replacing Selected Topics with Permanent number; already listed in program

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course is an elective for students in anthropology (both MA and PhD), as well as an elective for students in Public Health and other health related fields at both the Masters and doctorate level

    Average student enrollment in past semesters has been 12.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 3 or more times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Extensive theoretical and methodological knowledge in applied biological anthropology.

    The instructor teaching the course needs a PhD degree.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    ● To examine the major theories, ideas, and knowledge in biological anthropology

    ● To examine the biocultural synthesis

    ● To apply this information to contemporary problems and issues (e.g., health, forensics, human variation and race)

    ● To complete a draft proposal that addresses an applied biocultural problem or issue

    B. Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the course, the student should have a good understanding of the following:

    1. major theories in biological anthropology (i.e., evolutionary, ecological, human adaptability, biomedical, political-economy , political ecology, life history)

    2. bio-cultural perspective or synthesis

    3. methods and techniques used in various specialty areas (e.g., nutritional anthropology, human genetics, and demography)

    4. application of theories and methods to contemporary problems and issues (e.g., health and disease, race)

    5. importance of theory and mixed methods in the carrying out of biocultural research projects.

    C. Major Topics

    The theory of evolution; Evolution and Intelligent Design; History of human biology; Evolutionary Theory in Public Health; Biocultural synthesis;Political Economy and Political Ecology; Critical look at Race and racism; Allostatic load; Globalization, nutrition, and health; Life history and fetal origins; the history of Applied Biological anthropology; selected bioanthro methods; research proposals in bioanthropology

    D. Textbooks

    Alan H. Goodman and Thomas L. Leatherman (eds.). Building a New Biocultural Synthesis: Political-Economic Perspectives on Human Biology, 1998. Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Additional set of 43 articles

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    10 article critiques (15% total)

    take home essay exam (25%)

    3 in class presentations (15%)

    Written proposal (25%)

    Oral presentation of proposal (10%)

    Class participation and attendance (10%)

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    A. Article critiques:

    Students are required to write critiques for any 10 articles from the reading list not including the ones that they present on in class. The critiques should be 1 page (single spaced, one inch margins, 11 or 12 font) and should include the following items: 1) a description of the goals, methods, theory, and main findings (if applicable), 2) a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the article, 3) a discussion of the contribution that the author(s) make(s) to applied bioanthropology, and 4) when appropriate, a description of the ways in which the ideas and/or findings from this article could be strengthened. The critiques should be submitted electronically to the instructor by no later than Wednesday at mid-night prior to the class meeting Wednesday.

    A. Article critiques:

    Students are required to write critiques for any 10 articles from the reading list not including the ones that they present on in class. The critiques should be 1 page (single spaced, one inch margins, 11 or 12 font) and should include the following items: 1) a description of the goals, methods, theory, and main findings (if applicable), 2) a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the article, 3) a discussion of the contribution that the author(s) make(s) to applied bioanthropology, and 4) when appropriate, a description of the ways in which the ideas and/or findings from this article could be strengthened. The critiques should be submitted electronically to the instructor by no later than Wednesday at mid-night prior to the class meeting Wednesday.

    . Presentations on readings

    Each student is required to lead the discussion on three of the required readings during the semester. A sign-up sheet with list of readings will be posted on Blackboard. After reviewing the list students will sign-up for presentations on a first come first served basis. Please note that students will not be permitted to present on any of the readings that they have written critiques for.

    Like the article critiques, the presentation should include a the following information: 1) a description of the goals, methods, theory, and main findings (if applicable), 2) a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the article, 3) a discussion of the contribution that the author(s) make(s) to anthropology, and 4) when appropriate, a description of the ways in which the ideas and/or findings from this article could be strengthened. Students are required to prepare a handout to be given out during their presentation. These handouts can be used in preparation for the take-home exam.

    Applied biocultural proposal

    Grant writing skills are essential for the successful development and implementation of research projects and service programs. With increasing specialization within and across disciplines, more researchers are collaborating on grant proposals in order to develop the expertise to answer complex questions. Each student will use the guidelines from the National Science Foundation and write a proposal that includes the following: 1) the project summary (1 page), 2) project description (10 pages), 3) budget and budget description, 4) biosketch (up to 2 pages), and 5) reference list. The proposal will focus on a topic in applied bioanthropology. It must include at least one theory discussed in class and incorporate mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative). The proposal should conform to NSF guidelines (single-spaced, 11-12 font, one inch margins).

    At the end of the semester (see schedule), each student will present their proposal to the class for discussion. Students should use PowerPoint and the presentation should last for 15 minutes and will be followed by Q & A. The proposal will be evaluated using NSF criteria- 1) the intellectual merit of the proposed activity and 2) the broader impact of the proposed activity.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. Its the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Make up work will only be available in cases of justified, documented absences

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MA, PhD, and Dual degree programs in Applied Anthropology


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.