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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EME6209

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Current Status: Approved by SCNS - 2012-04-09
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 1/13/12. approved 1/19/12 for 1/23/12 mtg. to USF System 1/24/12; to SCNS 2/1/12. Appd eff 3/15/12


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2604 2011-08-29
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Secondary Education ED 172400
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Dr. Steve Downey 8139747952 downey@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EME 6209 Digital Video

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Digital Video
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    This course addresses concepts issues and practices associated with creating effective instructional DVD videos Included in the course topics are production mgmt storyboarding camera lighting techniques editing graphics hardware systems


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Offered as enrichment course (not part of program/concentration/certificate)

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course has been offered as EME 6936 Digital Video for 7 years For each offering enrollment routinely reaches 15 18 students with the figure growing in recent years This growing enrollment is reflective of the fact that more and more frequently employers with open instructional technology positions are seeking individuals with video and graphical production capabilities Also informal feedback from current students as well as recent graduates has told us program administrators that video production skills are one of the key elements in students job portfolios

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 3 or more times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    * A completed Ph.D. degree -- preferably in Instructional Technology or Mass Communication (Television/Video Production)

    * Prior video production experience

    * Experience using Adobe Premiere software is preferred

    (Pro version is preferred, but Elements version is workable)


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    Upon completion of this course a student is expect to be able to 1 Develop a storyboard reflecting the action appearing in a video 2 Describe the implications and barriers associated with intellectual property use in videos 3 Set up and use lighting effectively for shooting a digital video 4 Select and set up appropriate microphones for recording high quality audio tracks with video 5 Effectively use digital video cameras for shooting footage 6 Create graphics logos for use in digital videos 7 Edit sound tracks for incorporation into a digital video 8 Incorporate the use of effective editing techniques for content and story 9 Edit multiple two minute digital videos featuring interview and documentary techniques 10 Produce a 5 7 minute digital video including storyboarding scripting lighting shooting editing and rendering for an educational project

    B. Learning Outcomes

    It should be noted that this course supports instructional programs that do not lead to FL DOE certification i e M Ed Ed S and Ph D in Instructional Technology As such the student learning outcomes for this course map to standard industry practices and to the Adobe Certified Associate standards The Adobe Certified Associate certification is recognized by industry as a standard of excellence in multimedia production For the following the course objective is listed first followed by learning outcomes associated with that course objective 1 Develop a storyboard reflecting the action appearing in a video Identify elements of storyboards for video film production Properly label elements e g medium shot vs close up vs extreme close up on a storyboard using existing video footage for the storyboards Properly label elements e g medium shot vs close up vs extreme close up on a storyboard building your storyboards from scratch 2 Describe the implications and barriers associated with intellectual property use in videos Differentiate types of intellectual property copyright patent trade mark and trade secret Describe how copyright and trade mark laws affect video production especially when shooting on location outdoors Describe how Fair Use laws do and do not apply to instructional videos 3 Set up and use lighting effectively for shooting a digital video Identify causes of common lighting problems Arrange lighting systems to solve lighting problems 4 Select and set up appropriate microphones for recording high quality audio tracks with video Differentiate types of microphones based upon their uses and characteristics headsets lapel area table hand mic and shotgun mic Select microphones appropriate for the setting and action to be recorded in a video 5 Effectively use digital video cameras for shooting footage Identify different shot types based upon their characteristics and uses long full medium close up and extreme close up Demonstrate proper technique for executing different shot types Demonstrate proper technique for executing different camera movements pan tilt truck push pull zoom rack and compound Demonstrate proper technique for framing composing elements within a shot 6 Create graphics logos for use with digital videos Describe resolution levels e g on screen for computers vs TV standard definition vs TV high definition for use with videos Identify core elements appearing on DVD labels and jackets e g disc type DVD vs CD vs VCD vs other DVD region run time year produced copyrighted Produce in video graphical overlays and title screens appropriate to your videos resolution level Produce DVD labels and jacket covers fitting standard DVD discs and jackets cases Student Learning Objectives continued 7 Edit sound tracks for incorporation into a digital video Record voiceover audio track for use in a video Capture audio track from music source Edit multitrack audio recording using effects such as amplify noise removal fade in out etc Export multitrack sequence as an MP3 audio file 8 Incorporate the use of effective editing techniques for content and story Capture digitize video from in camera media to computer hard drive Sequence camera shots on editing time line Apply transitions appropriately to facilitate storytelling Apply advanced editing features e g color balancing incorporating in video graphics etc 9 Produce multiple two minute digital videos featuring interview and demonstration techniques rendered as small MPEG 2 files vs full scale DVDs Conduct pre production operations e g conceptualizing a video idea scouting locations casting roles acquiring equipment etc necessary to produce a professional quality instructional video file Direct production operations e g lighting setup audio engineering camera operation directing actors etc necessary to produce a professional quality instructional video file Conduct post production operations e g digitizing video sequencing editing transitions audio mixing creating graphics etc necessary to produce a professional quality instructional file 10 Produce a 5 7 minute digital video including storyboarding scripting lighting shooting editing and rendering for an educational project Conduct pre production operations e g conceptualizing a video idea drafting a treatment produce storyboards scouting locations casting roles acquiring equipment etc necessary to produce a professional quality instructional DVD Direct production operations e g lighting setup audio engineering camera operation directing actors etc necessary to produce a professional quality instructional DVD Conduct post production operations e g digitizing video sequencing editing transitions audio mixing creating graphics burning DVDs etc necessary to produce a professional quality instructional DVD

    C. Major Topics

    Week 1 1 12 Course Overview Behind the Scenes Production of Star Wars III Acquire necessary supplies to begin shooting next week 2 1 19 Camera Work Shot Types Camera Usage Framing Composing Elements in a Shot Field Work Show What U Shot Activity Reading Composing Shots 3 1 26 Lighting Techniques Equipment Review work in Show What U Shot Shooting Dialogue Sequences Field shoot Dialogue Seq Activity Read Sequencing Shots 4 2 2 Project Planning Locations Personnel Equipment Audio Review Dialogue Videos Begin DVA1 Field Show What U Shot II Read Interview Sequences 5 2 9 Shooting Interviews Angles Lighting Audio Basic Video Editing Capture Sequencing Rendering Read Chapters 2 5 in Premiere Books 6 2 16 Intermediate Video Editing Multitrack Editing Titles Transitions Graphic Overlays Begin DVA2 Read Chp 6 7 Pro book or Chp 7 8 Elements book 7 2 23 Audio Systems Mic Types Uses Multitrack Audio Editing Producing Voiceovers Begin DVA4 More Intermediate Editing Keyframes Motion Editing DVA1 Due Read Selecting a Mic Chp 9 Elements or Chp 12 Pro book 8 3 1 Storyboards Treatments Storyboard Elements Script Types Treatment Writing Begin DVA3 Read Writing a Treatment Storyline Development 9 3 8 Advanced Video Editing Split Screen Chroma Key Compound Effects Visit FCIT Video Studio DVA2 Due Read Chp 6 Elements Chp 9 11 Pro 3 15 Spring Break No Class This Week 10 3 22 Graphics In video graphics DVD Labels Jacket More Editing student requests Begin DVA5 DVA3 Due DVA4 Treatments Due 11 3 29 Animated Films History Machinema Production with Fraps Second Life DVA4 Project Plans Due Read Animated Films 12 4 5 Distribution Methods Indie YouTube DVD Burning System Hardware Buying Cams Editing PCs Players Read Just Sell It Yourself 13 4 12 History of TV and Film Hollywood until 1920s Lost History of the Invention of Television Project Work DVA4 Storyboards Due Read Hollywood as History 14 4 19 Intellectual Property Fair Use Laws Copyright Law IP Laws and Film landmark cases Project Work DVA5 Due Read IP Law Overview 15 4 26 Project Work lab time for editing fixing problems 16 5 3 Presentation of Final Videos DVA4 Final Video Due

    D. Textbooks

    Depending on the software students will be using to produce their instructional DVD videos Adobe Premiere Pro or Adobe Premiere Elements they will use one of the two follow texts to correspond to the software they own Premiere Pro is preferred but Premiere Elements is acceptable The reading list below supports both text formats Adobe Software 2010 Adobe Premiere Pro Classroom in a Book Current Version CS5 Berkeley CA Adobe Press or Adobe Software 2010 Adobe Premiere Elements Classroom in a Book Current Version 8 Berkeley CA Adobe Press

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Week 2 Katz S 1991 Composing Shots Film Directing Shot by Shot Ann Arbor MI Braun Brumfield See Discussion Board for PDF Week 3 Katz S 1991 Sequencing Shots Film Directing Shot by Shot Ann Arbor MI Braun Brumfield See Discussion Board for PDF Week 4 Katz S 1991 Interview Sequences Film Directing Shot by Shot Ann Arbor MI Braun Brumfield See Discussion Board for PDF Week 5 Read chapters 2 and 5 in either Adobe 2010 Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 Classroom in a Book Berkeley CA Adobe Press or Adobe 2010 Adobe Premiere Elements 8 Classroom in a Book Berkeley CA Adobe Press Week 6 Read chapters 6 and 7 in Adobe 2010 Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 Classroom in a Book Berkeley CA Adobe Press or Read chapters 7 and 8 in Adobe 2010 Adobe Premiere Elements 8 Classroom in a Book Berkeley CA Adobe Press Week 7 Utz P 1992 Selecting a Microphone Todays Video Equipment Setup and Production Englewood Cliffs NJ Prentice Hall PTR See Discussion Board for PDF and Read chapter 12 in Adobe 2010 Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 Classroom in a Book Berkeley CA Adobe Press or Read chapter 9 in Adobe 2010 Adobe Premiere Elements 8 Classroom in a Book Berkeley CA Adobe Press Week 8 Matrazzo D 1985 Writing a Treatment Corporate Scriptwriting Book Portland and Communication Publishing Field S 1984 Storyline Development Screenwriters Workbook New York Dell Publishing Week 9 Read chapter 9 11 in Adobe 2010 Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 Classroom in a Book Berkeley CA Adobe Press or Read chapter 6 in Adobe 2010 Adobe Premiere Elements 8 Classroom in a Book Berkeley CA Adobe Press Week 10 No Readings Assigned Week 11 Filmsite 2011 Animated Films American Movie Classic FilmSite Accessed online at http www filmsite org animatedfilms html Week 12 Dargis M January 14 2010 Declaration of Indies Just Sell It Yourself New York Times accessed online at http www nytimes com 2010 01 17 movies 17dargis html Week 13 Mintz S 2007 Hollywood as History Digital History Retrieved online at http www digitalhistory uh edu historyonline hollywood history cfm Week 14 VLAA 2009 For Indepedent Filmmakers Intellectual Property Law Overview Volunteer Lawyers and Accountants for the Arts Accessed online at http www vlaa org view Film Intellectual Property Weeks 15 and 16 No readings are assigned NOTE PDFs are provided via the Discussion Board for readings in weeks 2 4 7 and 8

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    There are five assignments and one participation requirement for the course A total of 200 points are possible for the course DVA1 Interview Video 15 of course grade 30 points Shoot and edit a two minute video in which you interview one or more subjects about a given topic DVA2 Demonstration Video 15 Shoot and edit a two minute instructional video in which you demonstrate how to cook a dish of your choosing DVA3 Storyboarding 10 Given a completed video scene breakdown the scene and storyboard the camera shots necessary to render the final scene as it was presented to you DVA4 Video Production 40 Storyboard script light shoot edit and render a 5 7 minute video for an educational lesson or project You will create this project while working for a client from the College of Education or an outside organization Your grade will be based upon the quality of the video and the production portfolio treatment production plan storyboards DVA5 Graphic Creation Use 10 Using Photoshop create graphics for use with your DVA4 video DVD jacket insert disc label logos etc DVA0 Course Participation 10 You are expected to come to class prepared each week This includes having your readings completed sharing ideas participating in practice exercises answering other students questions and doing so in a manner that advances a class discussion or aids others in advancing their pursuits Grading Criteria Final grades for the course will conform to a traditional scale breakdown 90 80 70 etc I reserve the right to assign and designations for those instances where exceptional or variant performances were demonstrated Please note USF will not accept any coursework with a C grade or below towards a graduate degree In short a C or below equals an F in that you may be required to retake the course without grade forgiveness for the previous course grade

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    The information for this field Course Outline including topics assignments exams and tests is provided in 4 C dates topics readings etc and 4 F assignments There are no exams and tests for this course as all of the assessments are project based

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting Policy for Graduate Students For structured courses 6000 and above the College Campus Dean will set the first day class attendance requirement Check with the College for specific information This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories Educational Outreach Open University TV FEEDS Program Community Experiential Learning CEL Cooperative Education Training and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days times such as directed reading research or study individual research thesis dissertation internship practica etc Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty See USF Regulation Registration 4 0101 http usfweb2 usf edu usfgc ogc 20web currentreg htm Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students In accordance with Sections 1006 53 and 1001 74 10 g Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C 6 0115 the University of South Florida University USF has established the following policy regarding religious observances http usfweb2 usf edu usfgc gc pp acadaf gc10 045 htm In the event of an emergency it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations During this time USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to Blackboard Elluminate Skype and email messaging and or an alternate schedule It s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication and the main USF College and department websites emails and MoBull messages for important general information

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Late Assignments Except for the most extreme of circumstances e g hospitalization assignments completed late will be reduced one letter grade for each week they are late An assignments is considered late if it is submitted after the start of class on its respective due date Assignments not completed at the end of the semester will be given a zero Because technical problems arise in even the best of circumstances you should plan enough time to allow for completion and submission of your work Do NOT wait until the final day to complete and turn in assignments Technical problems and other issues that can be mitigated are not acceptable reasons for late completion of work Academic Integrity USF Review Committees please note the narrative appearing in the course syllabus shown below extends the scope of standard verbiage for academic integrity to include video and graphical works This was done because students submit primarily video and graphical products for their grades and very few written narratives It also includes a statement regarding plagiarism detection The USF Student Handbook defines plagiarism is defined as literary theft and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text For videos and texts in which a student employs information gathered from books articles video film graphical images e g logos photographs music or sound recordings or oral sources each direct quotation or usage as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public at large must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure i e listing them in the video credits Also for those cases where a student shoots photos and videos containing the image or likeness of other individuals Model Releases from those recorded individuals should be acquired Examples of plagiarism and or inappropriate academic behavior consists of passing off as ones own segments or the total of another persons work submission of work completed for another course or task and presented as an original product created solely for a course assignment and violation of intellectual property laws outside of Fair Use statutes in producing and or distributing products associated with course assignments To detect plagiarism I reserve the right to 1 request that assignments be submitted to me as electronic files and 2 electronically submit to SafeAssignment com or 3 ask students to submit their assignments to SafeAssignment com through myUSF Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an F with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted and the F shall be used to determine the final course grade It is the option of the instructor to assign the student a grade of F of FF the latter indicating dishonesty in the course For more information on USF Academic Policies please read the USF Graduate Catalog Sect 7 http www grad usf edu inc linked files Catalog 20and 20Policies 2010 2011 Section 207 revision73010 pdf

    J. Program This Course Supports

    M.Ed., Instructional Technology [CCO & CES] -- elective; Ed.S., Instructional Technology [SIT] -- elective; Ph.D., Instructional Technology [DIT] -- elective; Ph.D. Second Language Acquisition / Instructional Technology [DLT] -- elective


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    As this course is an elective and does not impose any course pre-requisites, it could serve any program in which a student has a free 6000-level elective.



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.