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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EEC7416

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2011-08-30
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: Change
Course Change Information (for course changes only): Change in course title to Sociocultural Approaches to Working with Children and Families
Comments: To GC 5/10/11; reviewed 6/6/11. objetives need revision - emailed 6/29/11. cleared 6/30/11; GC approved 7/5/11. To USF Syst 7/5/11; to SCNS 7/13/11. Approved effective 8/1/11


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2550 2011-04-08
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Childhood Education & Literacy Studies ED 172100
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Ilene Berson 8139747698 iberson@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EEC 7416 Ecological Approaches to work with Children, Family Community

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Sociocul App to Work w Chi Fam
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 100

    Prerequisites

    Doctoral Standing

    Corequisites

    Doctoral Standing

    Course Description

    Focuses on issues relevant to young children within the context of their families and communities. Foundational and current research is examined in light of social policies. Open to all advanced graduate students and may not be repeated for credit.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Offered as enrichment course (not part of program/concentration/certificate)

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    We are proposing to change the title of this course as the previous title wasn't fully representing the course content.

    Doctoral students specializing in early childhood education are required to take the course as part of their program. Doctoral students in other related fields will benefit from this course as sociocultural approach is one of the contemporary trends in the field of early childhood education to understand and support children and familes with diverse backgrounds.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Graduate Faculty in Early Childhood Education program in the Department of Childhood Educatin and Literacy Studies


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Demonstrate understanding of the cultural nature of human development and situate evolving understandings of development within historical contexts.

    2. Identify underlying assumptions about families and communities that have informed early childhood programs and identify critical issues pertaining to home-school relationships.

    3. Demonstrate an understanding of ecological theoretical frameworks and constructs that inform research and practice in early childhood education.

    4. Analyze current and foundational research and scholarship related to culture and early schooling.

    5. Synthesize literature and draw from a cultural perspective of development to articulate implications for educational practice or educational research.

    6. Explore the nature of conducting scholarly work in early childhood education (e.g. identify key journals and other resources, writing processes, the peer-review process).

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1. Demonstrate understanding of the cultural nature of human development and situate evolving understandings of development within historical contexts.

    2. Identify underlying assumptions about families and communities that have informed early childhood programs and identify critical issues pertaining to home-school relationships.

    3. Demonstrate an understanding of ecological theoretical frameworks and constructs that inform research and practice in early childhood education.

    4. Analyze current and foundational research and scholarship related to culture and early schooling.

    5. Synthesize literature and draw from a cultural perspective of development to articulate implications for educational practice or educational research.

    6. Explore the nature of conducting scholarly work in early childhood education (e.g. identify key journals and other resources, writing processes, the peer-review process).

    C. Major Topics

    - Historical background of Sociocultural Approach

    - Understanding Vygotsky

    - Sociocultural Approach and Child Development/DAP

    - Sociocultural Approach and Community

    - Sociocultural Approach and Family Ethnotheories

    - Bridging Home and School Discourses

    - Cross-cultural research

    - Cultural Reciprocity

    - Implications for Practice

    D. Textbooks

    Rogoff, B. (2003). The cultural nature of human development. NY: Oxford University Press.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Supplementary readings:

    Becker, H. S. (1986). Freshman English for graduate students: A memoir and two theories. In H. S. Becker (author) Writing for social scientists: How to start and finish you thesis, book,or article (pp. 1-25). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    Bruner, J. (1996). Folk pedagogy. In J. Bruner (author) The culture of education (pp. 44-65).Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

    Cazden, C. B. (2001). Sharing time. In C. B. Cazden (author) Classroom discourse: The language of teaching and learning (2nd ed) (pp. 10-29). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

    Heath, S. B. (1982). Questioning at Home and at School: A comparative study. In G. Spindler (Ed.) Doing the Ethnography of Schooling (pp 102-131). New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston. pp.102-131.

    Kalyanpur, M. & Harry, B. (1999). Professionals’ perspectives on parenting styles. In M. Kaylanpur & B. Harry (authors) Culture in special education: Building reciprocal family professional relationships (pp 77-112). Baltimore: Paul H. Brooks.

    Kalyanpur, M. & Harry, B. (1999). The posture of cultural reciprocity. In M. Kaylanpur & B. Harry (authors) Culture in special education: Building reciprocal family-professional relationships (pp 113-131). Baltimore: Paul H. Brooks.

    Lubeck, S. (1998). Is developmentally appropriate practice for everyone? Childhood Education, 74(5), 283-293.

    Natriello, G. (2000). For the record: Reviewing books. Teachers College Record, 102 (2), 267-270. Retrieved from http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 10518

    Natriello, G. (2000). For the record: Preparing reviews. Teachers College Record, 102(1), 1-4. Retrieved from http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 10490.

    Natriello, G. (1996). Lessons for young scholars seeking to publish. Teachers College Record,97(4), 509-517. Retrieved from http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 1415

    O’Brien, L.M. (1996). Turning my world upside down: how I learned to question developmentally appropriate practice. Childhood Education, 73(2), 100-103.

    Roopnarine, J. L. & Metindogan, A. (2006). Early childhood education research in cross-national perspective. In B. Spodek & O. N. Saracho (Eds.) Handbook of research on the education of young children (2nd ed) (pp 555-571). New Jersey: Lawrence Earlbaum.

    Tobin, J. (1995). The irony of self-expression. American Journal of Education, 103(3), 233-258.Published by: The University of Chicago Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/108553

    Student-selected book:

    Barrera, I., Kramer, L., Andrews, L. (2009). Using skilled dialogue to transform challenging interactions: Honoring identity, voice, and connection. NY: Paul H. Brookes.

    Compton-Lilly, C. (2007). Re-reading families: The literate lives of urban children (four years later). NY: Teachers College Press.

    Delpit, L. (2006). Other people’s children: Cultural conflict in the classroom (anniversary edition). NY: The New Press.

    Genishi, C. & Dyson, A. H. (2009). Children, language, and literacy: Diverse learners in diverse times. NY: Teachers College Press.

    hooks, b (1994). Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. NY: Routledge.

    Ladson-Billings, G. (2009). The dreamkeepers: Successful teachers of African-American children (2nd ed). NY: Jossey-Bass.

    Lewis, C. C. (2004). Educating hearts and minds: Reflections on Japanese preschool and elementary education. NY: Cambridge University Press.

    Tobin, J., Hsueh, Y., & Karasawa, M. (2009). Preschool in three cultures revisited: China,

    Japan, and the United States. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Course Assignments (225 points total)

    (a) Participation: 25

    (b) Reading Responses: 30

    (c) Discussion Leading: 15

    (d) Article Review: 15

    (e) Essay Book Review: 40

    (f) Class Project: 100

    Grading Scale (based on weighted points):

    94-100 A

    90-93 A+

    90-93 A-

    87-89 B+

    84-86 B

    80-83 B-

    77-70 C+

    74-76 C

    70-73 C-

    67-69 D+

    64-66 D

    60-63 D-

    60 or below F

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Assignment Descriptions

    The doctorate in education “prepares educators for the application of appropriate and specific practices, the generation of new knowledge, and for the stewardship of the profession” (The Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate, http://cpedinitiative.org/). This stewardship involves generating new knowledge, conserving the ideas that are a legacy of work in the field, and transforming knowledge by teaching and communicating understandings to various audiences (Golde, 2006). Generating knowledge has to do with the ability to ask important questions, formulate appropriate strategies for investigation, interpret and evaluate the results of investigations, and communicate what was learned with others in order to advance the field. Conservation implies understanding of the history and fundamental ideas of the field, and “recognizes that disciplinary stewards are aware of the shoulders on which they stand and must judge which ideas are worth keeping and which have outlived their usefulness, examining how their disciplines fit into the larger intellectual landscape” (para. 4). Transformation refers to effectively representing and communicating ideas; that is, teaching (in a broad sense).

    Assignments in this class will address these three aspects of stewardship. Students will have the opportunity to develop the ability to conserve foundational ideas in the field, engage in processes involved in generating new knowledge, and transform by communicating these new understandings to others.

    (a) Participation:

    Active and thoughtful engagement in discussions and activities during class meetings are expected of members of a scholarly community. Careful reading of the assigned material should be done before class in order to be prepared to participate in related class discussions/activities. Active engagement also includes completing all (graded and non-graded) assignments, raising thoughtful questions, facilitating discussions with peers, and contributing to the learning of others in the class. Prompt attendance to each class session is required.

    (b) Reading responses:

    Students are obligated as educators/scholars to sincerely engage with course material, go beyond the surface, consider material they may not like immediately, ponder multiple perspectives on an issue, reflect upon their own situation (make connections, see relevance), and formulate language to describe and understand that situation more fully. Reading responses are exploratory in nature; that is, thinking-on-paper done to discover, develop, and clarify ideas. Students will do some exploratory writing each week, responding to the shared class readings, discussions, and/or activities. These responses may pose a question or problem, express confusion, offer personal reactions, or make connections between course readings and related personal experiences. The responses will be shared in class and used to spark discussion, generate topics for exploration in greater depth, etc. Come to class ready to challenge, elaborate, comment—actively participate in discussion. Responses do not need to be lengthy- one to two paragraphs will suffice. Post your comments on the course discussion board by midnight on Wednesdays before class.

    (c) Discussion leading:

    In order to engage themselves and others in thinking about issues pertaining to culture and schooling, students will lead a discussion of assigned readings in class. Students will prepare discussion questions and activities to engage the class in a meaningful discussion of pertinent issues related to the readings/topic.

    (d) Review of a research article:

    Familiarity with core journals and participating in the review process is an essential part of scholarly work. Students will select an article from an early childhood research journal. The article should address the relationship between culture and schooling. Students will use a template provided to write a 2-3 page review of the article.

    (e) Essay book review:

    Students will read a mutually agreed upon text and write a 4-6 page review. The purpose here is to produce a review that would be appropriate for publication in a scholarly journal.

    (f) Class project:

    Class time will be allocated to helping each other identify a range of possible topics for further inquiry related to culture and early schooling. A purpose of this assignment is to make meaningful connections to your own work and research agendas and to communicate what you have learned about culture, context, and early schooling. In order to synthesize key course themes and articulate implications for research and practice, students may engage in projects that—for example-- involve data generation and analysis, constructing a proposal for research, conducting a thorough critical literature review, or writing an article for publication that discusses implications for practitioners. Early in the semester, each student will submit a topic and project plan for instructor approval. Later in the semester, students will present their projects to others in the class.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Each absence, regardless of reason, will result in the removal of participation points. Points will also be removed for tardiness and leaving class early. If a student must miss class due to medical emergency or other extenuating circumstances, please inform the instructor as soon as possible. Students may opt to hand in a reading response to earn partial participation points for the week (due no later than one week after the missed class). Excessive absences will result in a failing grade.

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Assignments will be give a letter grade based on the University grading system and the scoring guidelines that accompany each assignment. Assignments may not be revised for resubmission after the due date so it is strongly recommended that students arrange to meet with the professor in advance to receive feedback and additional guidance regarding progress on submissions. There are no extra credit assignments.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with a Concentration in Early Childhood Education


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    Curriculum & Instruction Elementary Ph.D.

    Other PH.D. students seeking a cognate in Early Childhood



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.