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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - LAE7745

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2011-07-17
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: To GC 5/10/11; reviewed. Pending Faculty credientials; revisions to objectives. Emailed 6/29/11. corrected 6/30/11; GC approved 7/5/11. To USF Syst 7/5/11; to SCNS 7/13/11. Appr eff 8/1/11. Nmbr chgd from 7747 to7745


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2547 2011-04-07
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Childhood Education & Literacy Studies ED 172100
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Dr. Jenifer Schneider 8139743460 jschneider@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    LAE 7745 Literary Theory and Research in Children’s Literature

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 - R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Children's Lit Theory
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Doctoral Level Status

    Corequisites

    N/A

    Course Description

    Critical examination of literary theories that inform the interpretation, criticism, and reading of literature written for school-aged readers and to survey current research in the field of literature in education.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Part of the student planned program of study.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Minimum of Ph.D. with advanced graduate courses in Children's Literature, Adolescent Literature, Literary Theory


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Interpretive Essay: Students will select a children’s literature text or text set (e.g. recent Holocaust novels) and examine the text(s) from a theoretical perspective. The student will write an incisive critique of the text(s) and submit the essay for publication in a journal such as Children’s Literature in Education.

    2. Book Review: Students will select a recent text published in the area of children’s literature. The students will conduct a review of the book and submit the review for publication.

    3. Interview with a noted Author/Illustrator: Students will select a writer or illustrator and conduct an interview to gain insight into the creator’s process or to highlight the subject matter of their books.

    4. Presentation: Students will present one of the aforementioned papers to the class in the form of a research conference presentation.

    5. Response Papers: Students will respond to the weekly readings. Responses will be posted online and shared with members of the class to further thinking about the topic.

    Students will be evaluated based on the quality of written work, the completion of readings, and consistent and thoughtful participation in class discussions. Student participation will be used to determine the extent to which reading assignments were completed. Written assignments will be judged based on the quality of the writing, the rigor of the analysis, and the comprehensiveness of the content. Standard grammar, spelling, and punctuation are required on all written assignments.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1. Interpretive Essay: Students will select a children’s literature text or text set (e.g. recent Holocaust novels) and examine the text(s) from a theoretical perspective. The student will write an incisive critique of the text(s) and submit the essay for publication in a journal such as Children’s Literature in Education.

    2. Book Review: Students will select a recent text published in the area of children’s literature. The students will conduct a review of the book and submit the review for publication.

    3. Interview with a noted Author/Illustrator: Students will select a writer or illustrator and conduct an interview to gain insight into the creator’s process or to highlight the subject matter of their books.

    4. Presentation: Students will present one of the aforementioned papers to the class in the form of a research conference presentation.

    5. Response Papers: Students will respond to the weekly readings. Responses will be posted online and shared with members of the class to further thinking about the topic.

    Students will be evaluated based on the quality of written work, the completion of readings, and consistent and thoughtful participation in class discussions. Student participation will be used to determine the extent to which reading assignments were completed. Written assignments will be judged based on the quality of the writing, the rigor of the analysis, and the comprehensiveness of the content. Standard grammar, spelling, and punctuation are required on all written assignments.

    C. Major Topics

    Week 1: The History and Value of Children’s Literature: Noted Scholars, Writers, and Illustrators

    of Children’s Books

    Week 2: Visual Elements in Children’s Literature: Semiotic Analysis and Hermeneutics

    Week 3: Ideologies of Children’s Fiction

    Week 4: Traditional Literary Criticism: What is Known and Knowable

    Week 5: Hermeneutics: Traditional Literature and Literary Lore

    Week 6: Reader Response: Implied Readers, Readerly/Writerly Texts

    Week 7: New Historicism, and Cultural Materialism: Historical Contexts and

    Children’s Fiction

    Week 8: Marxism and Critical Theory: Economic and Social Reflections

    Week 9: Structuralism and Post-structuralism: Intertextual Connections and Universal Narrative

    Structures

    Week 10: Psychoanalysis and Bibliotherapy: Texts as Entre’ and Voyeurism

    Week 11: Gender Studies and Queer Theory: Censorship, Prizing, and Issues of Truth

    Week 12: Cultural Studies, Ethnic Studies and Postcolonial Criticism: Authenticity and

    Representation

    Week 13: Child Culture, Film, and the Politics of Children’s Literature

    Politics of publishing children’s literature

    Children’s media and consumerism

    Film as interpretation

    Week 14: From Traditional Literary Criticism to Reader Response: Trends in Teaching and

    Analyzing Literature in School

    Week 15: Presentation Forum

    D. Textbooks

    Eagleton, T. (2008). Literary theory: An introduction. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

    Rice, P. and Waugh, P. (Eds.) (2001). Modern Literary Theory: A Reader. 4th edition. [This book provides essays and documents regarding various literary theories and forms of interpretation. It’s a complement to the Eagleton text.]

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Selected Readings from current journals.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Students will be evaluated based on the quality of written work, the completion of readings, and consistent and thoughtful participation in class discussions. Student participation will be used to determine the extent to which reading assignments were completed. Written assignments will be judged based on the quality of the writing, the rigor of the analysis, and the comprehensiveness of the content. Standard grammar, spelling, and punctuation are required on all written assignments.

    Grading Criteria:

    Plus/Minus Grading

    No grade below C- will be accepted toward a graduate degree.

    A+ = 98-100

    A = 95-97

    A- = 92-94

    B+ = 90-91

    B = 85-89

    B- = 82-84

    C+ = 80-81

    C = 75-79

    C- = 72-74

    D+ = 70-71

    D = 65-69

    D- = 62-64

    F = 0-61

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Week 1: The History and Value of Children’s Literature: Noted Scholars, Writers, and Illustrators

    of Children’s Books

    Week 2: Visual Elements in Children’s Literature: Semiotic Analysis and Hermeneutics

    Week 3: Ideologies of Children’s Fiction

    Week 4: Traditional Literary Criticism: What is Known and Knowable

    Week 5: Hermeneutics: Traditional Literature and Literary Lore

    Week 6: Reader Response: Implied Readers, Readerly/Writerly Texts

    Week 7: New Historicism, and Cultural Materialism: Historical Contexts and

    Children’s Fiction

    Week 8: Marxism and Critical Theory: Economic and Social Reflections

    Week 9: Structuralism and Post-structuralism: Intertextual Connections and Universal Narrative

    Structures

    Week 10: Psychoanalysis and Bibliotherapy: Texts as Entre’ and Voyeurism

    Week 11: Gender Studies and Queer Theory: Censorship, Prizing, and Issues of Truth

    Week 12: Cultural Studies, Ethnic Studies and Postcolonial Criticism: Authenticity and

    Representation

    Week 13: Child Culture, Film, and the Politics of Children’s Literature

    Politics of publishing children’s literature

    Children’s media and consumerism

    Film as interpretation

    Week 14: From Traditional Literary Criticism to Reader Response: Trends in Teaching and

    Analyzing Literature in School

    Week 15: Presentation Forum

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Each late assignment (for any reason) will lower your grade on the assignment by a letter grade for each calendar day that it is late. If you must turn in a late assignment, I will not accept it more than one week past its original due date.

    “Plagiarism is defined as "literary theft" and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public-at-large, must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one's own, segments or the total of another person's work.”

    “Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the "F" shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student a grade of "F" of "FF" (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.”

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Literacy Studies


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    Secondary Education; Special Education



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.