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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - LAE7718

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2011-09-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/10/11; reviewed 6/6/11; pending updates to Desc; faculty cred.; objectives. Emailed 6/28/11; updated and re-emailed 6/30. GC appd 7/19/11. to USF Systm for Con 7/19/11. to SCNS 7/27/11. Apprd (Eff 8/1/11??) submt as 7717; appd as 7718


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2546 2011-04-07
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Childhood Education & Literacy Studies ED 172100
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    James R. King 8139743460 jking9@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    LAE 7718 Linguistic Foundations in Literacy

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Linguistics in Literacy
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Advanced understanding of reading and literacy processes. Admission to Ph.D. program.

    Corequisites

    N/A

    Course Description

    Examines the historical, theoretical, and applied aspects of the relationships between linguistics and literacy.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Extensive coursework in theoretical linguistics including history of linguistics. Advanced theoretical training in literacy.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Students will develop knowledge of the historical development of the field of Linguistics.

    2. Students will develop knowledge of the historical development of the field of Literacy

    3. Students will develop an understanding of the relationships between the fields of Linguistics and Literacy.

    4. Students will synthesize research about a prominent scholar in Linguistics.

    5. Students will develop critical analysis skills and strategies within Linguistic and Literacy theories.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will develop knowledge of the historical development of the field of Linguistics.

    2. Students will develop knowledge of the historical development of the field of Literacy

    3. Students will develop an understanding of the relationships between the fields of Linguistics and Literacy.

    4. Students will synthesize research about a prominent scholar in Linguistics.

    5. Students will develop critical analysis skills and strategies within Linguistic and Literacy theories.

    C. Major Topics

    Course introduction, phonology, phonetic transcription

    Beginnings of Linguistics

    Linguistics 18th - 19th centuries

    20th century American linguistics

    Chomsky and Transformational, Generative Grammars, Skinner and the demise of linguistic behaviorism

    Current Issues: Deep Structure, Semantic Theories, Linguistic representation

    Applications: Generative Language Theory and Language Acquisition

    Applications: Psychological reality of linguistic units, text structures

    Linguistic representation, Follow up to Devitt

    Current Issues: The (premature) demise of Generative Semantics

    Post-Structural Critiques of Linguistic Theory, re-enactment of interviews (Chomsky, Foucault, Derrida, Kermode, Moi)

    Contributions of the Prague School to Transformational Grammars, conference paper re-enactment

    Individual Language Theorists and minimal labels (Hjelmslev=glossematics; Derrida=deconstruction; Foucault=power; Halliday=function; Sapir/ Whorf=culture; Skinner=behavior; Brown=language acquisition; Jakobson=distinctive features)

    Famous Linguists Poster Sessions, AERA format

    D. Textbooks

    Sueren, P. (2008). The history of western linguistics. London: Blackwell.

    Finch, G. (2005). Key concepts in language and linguistics. New York: Palgrave.

    Devitt, M. (2006). Ignorance of language. Oxford, UK: Oxford Uni. Press.

    Seruen, P. (2004). Chomsky's Minimalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Chomsky, N. (1995). The Minimalist Program. Cambridge: MIT Press.

    Huck & Goldsmith (2007). Generative Semantics.

    Kuhn, T. (1970). The structure of scientific revolutions (2nd). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Gardner, H. (1985). Linguistics: the search for autonomy. In The Mind's New Science (pp. 182-193). New York: Basic Books.

    Hacken, P. (2005). Review of P. Seuren's Chomsky's Minimalism. Jounal of Linguistics, 42, 227-229.

    Heatherington, M. (1980). The grammars of English. In M. Heatherington How language works (pp. 65-73). Cambridge: Winthrop

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    1. Midterm critique/elaboration of a language approach and it application in literacy theory and practices. The paper will draw parallels between historical linguistics propositions and more recent practice in literacy education. (30%)

    2. Final paper on a selected linguist with implications for literacy theory and practice drawn from an analysis of the linguist's body of work. The paper will present thorough understanding of the body of linguistic work, present credible application to reading theory and practice, and be supported with appropriate citations of the relevant professional literature. (30%)

    3. Presentation of Famous Linguist in an AERA-like poster session. The guidelines from AERA's poster presentations will be used as a rubric for evaluation. (30%)

    4. Students will complete weekly readings and vodcast viewings, take notes, and come to class ready to discuss the readings. (10%)

    A+ = 98-100

    A = 94-97

    A- = 90-93

    B+ = 87-89

    B = 84-86

    B- = 80-83

    C+ = 77-79

    C = 74-76

    C- = 70-73

    D+ = 67-69

    D = 64-66

    D- = 60-63

    F = 59 and Below

    No grade below a C- will be accepted toward a graduate degree

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Week 1 Course introduction, phonology, phonetic transcription

    Week 2 Beginnings of Linguistics up to 17th century, language and philosophy, Rationalism, Romanticism, Neo-Grammarians, Humboldt and Cognitive beginnings

    Week 3 Linguistics 18th - 19th centuries, Structuralism, de Saussure, Prague School, Distinctive features

    Week 4 20th century American linguistics (up to 1950s)

    Week 5 Chomsky and Transformational, Generative Grammars, Skinner and the demise of linguistic behaviorism

    Week 6 Current Issues: Deep Structure, Semantic Theories, Linguistic representation

    Week 7 Applications: Generative Language Theory and Language Acquisition

    Week 8 Applications: Psychological reality of linguistic units, text structures

    Week 9 Linguistic representation, Follow up to Devitt

    Week 10 Current Issues: The (premature) demise of Generative Semantics

    Week 11 Post-Structural Critiques of Linguistic Theory, re-enactment of interviews (Chomsky, Foucault, Derrida, Kermode, Moi)

    Week 12 Contributions of the Prague School to Transformational Grammars, conference paper re-enactment

    Week 13 Individual Language Theorists and minimal labels (Hjelmslev=glossematics; Derrida=deconstruction; Foucault=power; Halliday=function; Sapir/Whorf=culture; Skinner=behavior; Brown=language acquisition; Jakobson=distinctive features)

    Week 14 Famous Linguists Poster Sessions, AERA format

    Week 15 Course synthesis and future directions, round table discussion with panelists

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Each late assignment (for any reason) will lower your grade on the assignment by a letter grade for each calendar day that it is late. If you must turn in a late assignment, it will not be accepted more than one week past its original due date.

    “Plagiarism is defined as "literary theft" and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public-at-large, must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one's own, segments or the total of another person's work.”

    “Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the "F" shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student a grade of "F" of "FF" (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.”

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction: Concentration in Literacy Studies


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    Ph.D. students in Second Language Acquisition and Instructional Technology. Ph.D. Students in Secondary English Education



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.