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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EDG7939

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2011-07-17
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/10/11; lrning outcomes need revision; emailed 6/28/11; cleared 6/29/11; GC approved 7/5/11. To USF Syst 7/5/11; to SCNS 7/13/11. Approved eff 8/1/11


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2544 2011-04-07
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Childhood Education & Literacy Studies ED 172100
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Jolyn Blank 9741029 jblank@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EDG 7939 Advanced Graduate Seminar: Research in Progress

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration?
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Seminar: Research in Progress
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    EDG 7938 Advanced Graduate Seminar: Introduction to Research

    Corequisites

    N/A

    Course Description

    Interdisciplinary work and collaborative research will be fostered through an inquiry group. The group will work as a community of discursive social practice with the goal of more fully engaging doctoral students in the intellectual life of the discipline


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Doctoral students need support to learn how to publish research. The intensive writing experience will include one-on-one consultations and peer/participant feedback and support for setting goals, solving problems, and working efficiently as writer-researchers.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Graduate faculty in the Department of Childhood Education and Literacy Studies


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    a) Develop a presentation that reports on research in progress, identifies questions to guide feedback, and identifies a scholarly issue encountered in the work.

    b) Review scholarly work in progress and provide feedback that addresses the problems identified by the presenter, demonstrates knowledge and understanding of research process, and serves to enhance the work reviewed.

    c) Revise scholarly work based upon feedback received.

    d) Develop collaborative research partnerships that facilitate professional development.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    a) Develop a presentation that reports on research in progress, identifies questions to guide feedback, and identifies a scholarly issue encountered in the work.

    b) Review scholarly work in progress and provide feedback that addresses the problems identified by the presenter, demonstrates knowledge and understanding of research process, and serves to enhance the work reviewed.

    c) Revise scholarly work based upon feedback received.

    d) Develop collaborative research partnerships that facilitate professional development.

    C. Major Topics

    Conceptualizing Theoretical Research

    Forms and Functions of Research/Scholarship

    Academic Writing Strategies

    Collaborative Writing Strategies

    Roles and Responsibilities of Reviewers

    Responding to Reviewer Feedback

    Forming Research Collaborations

    D. Textbooks

    Becker, H. S. (1998). Tricks of the trade: How to think about your research while you are doing it. Chicago: University of Chicago.

    This text provides very practical strategies for conducting and writing research. The exemplars are accessible and varied.

    Wolcott, H. F. (2009). Writing up qualitative research (3rd ed.). Newbury Park: Sage.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    N/A

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Research Presentations (20%): Throughout the semester, students will provide summaries of their research work to date, set tasks for readers/reviewers, and facilitate class discussion about the nature of the work in progress, including questions about form, presentation, data analysis, etc.

    Reader/Reviewer Feedback (30%): Students will respond to the research presentations by providing written and oral feedback to the authors.

    Research Products (50%): Students will provide documentation of research in various forms of production and revisions based on the feedback provided during the research presentations.

    Grading Criteria:

    A+ = 98-100

    A = 95-97

    A- = 92-94

    B+ = 90-91

    B = 85-89

    B- = 82-84

    C+ = 80-81

    C = 75-79

    C- = 72-74

    D+ = 70-71

    D = 65-69

    D- = 62-64

    F = 61

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Research Presentations: Throughout the semester, students will provide summaries of their research work to date, set tasks for readers/reviewers, and facilitate class discussion about the nature of the work in progress, including questions about form, presentation, data analysis, etc.

    Reader/Reviewer Feedback: Students will respond to the research presentations by providing written and oral feedback to the authors.

    Research Products: Students will provide documentation of research in various forms of production and revisions based on the feedback provided during the research presentations.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    “Plagiarism is defined as "literary theft" and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public-at-large, must be attributed to its author by means of the

    appropriate citation procedure. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one's own, segments or the total of another person's work.”

    “Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the "F" shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student

    a grade of "F" of "FF" (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.”

    A grade of ‘I’ will only be awarded for situations in which the student has completed the majority of the coursework and is confronted with an extenuating circumstance at the end of the semester, which significantly impacts their ability to complete assignments in a timely manner.

    Each late assignment (for any reason) will lower your grade on the assignment by a letter grade for each calendar day that it is late. If you must turn in a late assignment, it will not be accepted more than one week past its original due date. Any tardy over 30 minutes is considered an absence.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Early Childhood Education (Ph.D.), Elementary Education, Literacy Studies


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    PhD programs across the college of education that have doctoral students interested in a focus on Elementary Education



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.