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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EDG7046

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2011-08-01
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/10/11; learning outcomes need correction - emailed 6/28/11. cleared 6/29/11; GC approved 7/5/11. To USF Syst 7/5/11; to SCNS 7/13/11. Approved effective 8/1/11


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2540 2011-04-07
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Childhood Education & Literacy Studies ED 172100
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Danielle Dennis 9740597 dennis@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EDG 7046 Trends and Issues in Educational Policy: Literacy and Teacher

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Ed Policy Lit Tchr Ed
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    N/A

    Corequisites

    N/A

    Course Description

    Offers the opportunity for wide reading and vigorous discussion of a variety of texts focused on the historical and current educational policies impacting literacy, elementary, and teacher education.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    It is essential for doctoral students to have opportunities to learn about the courses they are teaching within our undergraduate programs, and to consider ways in which they will study their teaching and engage in inquiry and professional development

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 1 time

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    PhD; Faculty in Early Childhood, Elementary, and /or Reading/Language Arts graduate programs


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Develop initial understandings of educational policy development.

    2. Introduce recent federal and state policy development linked to early childhood, elementary, and literacy curriculum and instruction.

    3. Understand the historical roots of the educational policies that have impacted the areas of early childhood, elementary, and a literacy education.

    4. Review the role of research in the development of educational policy.

    5. Synthesize policy and policy impact from a select area of early childhood, elementary, and/or literacy education.

    6. Communicate/disseminate policy synthesis.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1. Develop initial understandings of educational policy development.

    2. Introduce recent federal and state policy development linked to early childhood, elementary, and literacy curriculum and instruction.

    3. Understand the historical roots of the educational policies that have impacted the areas of early childhood, elementary, and a literacy education.

    4. Review the role of research in the development of educational policy.

    5. Synthesize policy and policy impact from a select area of early childhood, elementary, and/or literacy education.

    6. Communicate/disseminate policy synthesis.

    C. Major Topics

    • Course Introduction

    o Introduction to the policy process

    o Preliminary identification of individual policy domain study

    • Conventional Government and Politics, Broader Influences, and Improving the Policy Making Process (Lindbloom & Woodhouse, 1993)

    • History of US Educational Policy (Cross, 2010)

    • Policy Analysis (Kingdon, 2003)

    • White papers/Policy Briefs

    • Reauthorization of ESEA (Blueprint for the reauthorization of ESEA)

    • IDEA

    • Race to the Top (RttT RFP; Florida’s RttT proposal)

    • Florida’s Mandatory Third Grade Retention Policy as an Exemplar of Individual Policy Domain Study

    • Florida’s Senate and House Education Committees: Following the most recent legislative session

    o Focus on the bills presented and passed during the session and the research supporting/debunking assertions relating to the bills

    o Who are the key players?

    • Policy implementation related specifically to:

    o Elementary Teacher Education

    o Early Childhood Education

    o Literacy Education

    • Role of research in policy development (Hess, 2008)

    • Individual Policy Domain Study

    o Presentation of individual topics

    D. Textbooks

    Lindblom, C. E., & Woodhouse, E. J. (1993). The policy-making process (3rd ed.). Prentice Hall.

    Cross, C. T. (2010). Political education: National policy comes of age, 2nd Ed.. New York: Teachers College Press. (L)

    Kingdon, J. W. (2003). Agendas, alternatives, and public policies. (2nd ed.). New York: Longman.(P)

    McDonnell, L. M. & Hess, F. M. (2008). When research matters: How scholarship influences educational policy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    L =Legislation I = Implementation of policy

    P = Policy process M = Media

    Allington, R. L. (2002) Big Brother and the national reading curriculum: How ideology trumped evidence. Heinemann. (P)

    Cappella, J. N., & Jamieson, K. H. (1997). Spiral of cynicism: The press and the public good. New York: Oxford University Press. (M)

    Coles, G. (2003). Reading the naked truth: Literacy, legislation, and lies. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (L)

    Garan, E. (2002). Resisting reading mandates. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (L)

    House, E. (1998). Schools for sale. New York: Teachers College Press. (P)

    Jennings, N. E. (1996). Interpreting policy in real classrooms: Case studies of state reform and teacher practice. New York: Teachers College Press. (I)

    Lakoff, G. Don't think of an elephant: Know your values and frame the debate. White River junction, VT: Chelsea Green Publishing. (M)

    Kohn, A., & Shannon, P. (2002). Education, Inc: Turning learning into a business. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (P)

    Lieberman, T. (2000). Slanting the story: The forces that shape the news. New York: The New Press. (M)

    McGill-Franzen, A. M. (1993). Shaping the preschool agenda: Early literacy, public policy and professional beliefs. Albany: State University of New York Press.(I)

    Pennington, J. L. (2004). The colonization of literacy education: A story of reading in one elementary school. New York: Peter Lang. (I)

    Smith, M. L., Miller-Kahn, L., Heinecke, W., & Jarvis, P. F. (2004). Political spectacle and the fate of American schools. New York: RoutledgeFalmer. (I)

    Song, M., & Young, T. V. (2008). Reading: Policy, politics, and processes. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing. (P)

    Spring, J. (2001). Political agendas for education: From the Christian Coalition to the Green Party. Mahwah,NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. (P)

    Spring, J. (2002). Conflicts of interest: The politics of American education. NY: McGraw-Hill. (P)

    Stein, S. J. (2004). The culture of educational policy. New York: Teachers College Press. (P)

    Sunderman, G. L. (2008). Holding NCLB accountable: Achieving accountability, equity, and school reform. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. (I)

    Wolf, S. A., Borko, H., Elliott, R. L., & McIver, M. C. (2000). "That dog won't hunt!": Exemplary school change efforts within Kentucky reform. American Educational Research Journal, 37(2), 349-395.

    Wanta, W. (1997). The public and the national agenda: How people learn about important issues. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. (M)

    Woodside-Jiron, H. (2004). Language, power, and participation: Using critical discourse analysis to make sense of public policy. In R. Rogers (Ed.), An introduction to critical discourse analysis in education (pp. 173-205). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    A+ = 98-100 B+ = 87-89

    A = 94-97 B = 84-86

    A- = 90-93 B- = 80-83

    C+ = 77-79

    C = 74-76

    C- = 70-73

    D = 64-66

    D- = 60-63

    D+ = 67-69

    F = 59 and Below

    Personal EduBlog 15%

    Policy Domain Presentation 25%

    Class Discussion Leader 25%

    White Paper 35%

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    • Course Introduction

    o Introduction to the policy process

    o Preliminary identification of individual policy domain study

    • Conventional Government and Politics, Broader Influences, and Improving the Policy Making Process (Lindbloom & Woodhouse, 1993)

    • History of US Educational Policy (Cross, 2010)

    • Policy Analysis (Kingdon, 2003)

    • White papers/Policy Briefs

    • Reauthorization of ESEA (Blueprint for the reauthorization of ESEA)

    • IDEA

    • Race to the Top (RttT RFP; Florida’s RttT proposal)

    • Florida’s Mandatory Third Grade Retention Policy as an Exemplar of Individual Policy Domain Study

    • Florida’s Senate and House Education Committees: Following the most recent legislative session

    o Focus on the bills presented and passed during the session and the research supporting/debunking assertions relating to the bills

    o Who are the key players?

    • Policy implementation related specifically to:

    o Elementary Teacher Education

    o Early Childhood Education

    o Literacy Education

    • Role of research in policy development (Hess, 2008)

    • Individual Policy Domain Study

    o Presentation of individual topics

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Unexcused late work will lose 10% of the total points each day it is late. An assignment turned in 5 or more days late will not be accepted.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Elementary, and Literacy Studies,


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    Programs in Secondary Education, Psychological and Social Foundations, and Educational Measurement.



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.