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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - TSL5326

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2011-07-17
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: to GC 5/10/11; GC approved 6/6/11; to USF system for concurrence 6/23/11; to SCNS 7/1/11. Approved effective 8/1/11. Number subm 6932; approved 5326. posted in banner


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2531 2011-04-06
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Secondary Education ED 172400 Secondary Ed.
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Phil Smith 41113 pcsmith@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    TSL 5326 L2 Reading for ESOL Students across Content Areas

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable?
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    L2 Rdng ESOL Stds Cont Areas
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    This ESOL course will provide students with understanding of the linguistic and literacy needs of minority/heritage students, and will negotiate issues of second language learning, language varieties, as well as critical literacy and reading.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course allows us to offer only one ESOL course and still meet the ESOL requirements and Reading Competencies 1 & 2. It helps cut the MAT down from 42 credit hours to 33 credit hours. It makes the program more competitive and aims to attract international students who would like to teach Foreign Languages in Florida, including the less commonly taught languages in U.S. schools.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    At least 18 credit hours in ESOL/TESOL or a related field at the graduate level


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1.0 Develop an understanding for modes of educational delivery within schools as inherently multicultural / pluralist communities.

    2.0 Develop a critical understanding of second language acquisition and the complexities of bilingual communication in order to understand better the dimensions and implications of second language development on teaching and learning

    3.0 Develop competence in notions of language variation and the ideological role standardness and language ideologies play in the empowerment of all students

    4.0 Develop an understanding of the linguistic subfields of Phonology, Phonetics, & Phonics and for their application in bilingual communication and in the learning of English as a second language.

    5.0 Develop an understanding of the linguistic subfields of Discourse, Pragmatics, Non-verbal communication, Semantics, Syntax, and Morphology, and for their application in bilingual communication and in the learning of English as a second language.

    6.0 Understand and better appreciate critical literacy within a postmodern perspective as it relates to educational practices within the context of difference, dissonance and discontinuities.

    7.0 Understand the characteristics and development of emergent literacy.

    8.0 Understand the role, function and implications 1.0-7.0 above have on reading practices, reading development and reading assessment in the education of ELL students

    9.0 Synthesize and articulate how principles of second language literacy research in bilingual education frame and support inclusive instructional practices.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Debriefings on Readings /Attendance/ Reading strategy (20pts)—

    ➢ You will have assigned readings each week and will be responsible for a group debriefing each week. At the beginning of each class, groups will meet to debrief the key ideas from the readings. You will be provided with the format for the debriefings each week. As mentioned, communication is an important factor in the success of this course. In order to fulfill the course requirements, students must communicate with other students on the discussion board and in their own work groups. Students are expected to communicate with the instructor as a learning resource, reply to emails, and follow deadlines. Students must check Blackboard frequently for announcements/updates in the assignments, and students must actively participate in threaded discussion events.

    ➢ Students will have assigned readings each week and will be responsible for a group debriefing each week. Because communication is an important factor in the success of this course, students are expected to not only develop summary logs, but also facilitate discussion forums each week.

    ➢ Students must check Blackboard frequently for announcements and updates regarding assignments. Students must actively participate in class discussions.

    ➢ Students must identify powerful strategies to enhance L2 reading comprehension and create new activities to augment L2 reading comprehension. More details will be announced.

    ➢ Certain students each week must develop questions (no more than 3) for discussion and post them by the scheduled date in BB. The assigned date will be announced.

    Case Study Folio w/ ELL Analysis (30pts)—You will work throughout the semester to compile a folio that reflects learning through case study pedagogy. Your folio will include and a detailed analysis of an ESOL learner’s language and literacy development, and will include: The Case Study, ELL Analysis, and Aspects of Literacy assignments. Florida Educator Accomplished Practices: 1-12, and Reading Competencies: 1 & 2.

    Your ELL Case Study is one of your core tasks for the semester. You will develop a case study on an ELL student. You will identify a student early in the semester who you will use as your case study subject. This child should be an ESOL student who has studied English for no more than 3 years. You will collect and record a conversation, a reading sample, and a writing sample, which you will analyze. You will then create a blog and a podcast as tools for sharing your analysis. Audio recordings of conversations and reading samples which meet the criteria for quality will be uploaded to iTunes U for dissemination on the web. ESOL PS’s: 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 14, 20, 21, 25

    ELL analysis: Analysis of an English language learner’s linguistic development. (This assignment will be divided into two parts, check the course schedule for due dates). Part I will include introduction, phonology, morphology, syntax and interview transcription; part II will include semantics, discourse and pragmatics, literacy, writing sample and additional materials.) Part I will be reviewed by the instructor and feedback will be provided for necessary revisions. When the whole paper (Part I and II) is submitted, you are expected to have made the necessary changes to Part I and used the instructors comments on part I to guide you in your writing of Part II. ESOL PS’s: 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 18, 24.

    Aspects of Literacy for ELLs —You will be involved in a collaborative assignment (e.g. wiki, video podcasting, or alternative methods--please consult with the instructor) that addresses effective and creative teaching strategies, methods, and activities for English language learners to enhance their reading and literacy skills. In order to explore the junction of new literacies made possible by technology and the need for content-area teachers to more fully embrace strategies and technology as integral tools of their teaching, you will create a content-based (reading and literacy) assignment for your future ESOL students to teach speaking, listening, reading, or writing. Your audience will be your colleagues or your English language learners. This will be discussed in greater detail in class. The projects will become part of the ESOL 2 database in Google Sites and selected projects will be published on iTunes U, so a high quality of information is expected. The detailed requirements will be posted in Blackboard. ESOL PS’s: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23.

    ESOL-infused Unit Plan (20 pts) – Modify a unit plan for ELL students: Search the Web and select a content-based unit plan appropriate to your subject of interest and modify it in order to accommodate ESOL students. The unit plan selected must be for native speakers. Modify the selected unit for each of the four levels of English proficiency. Your plan will be evaluated with a rubric. You must choose content lessons from math, science, social studies or language arts. You must include the original lesson. Use bold font to identify modifications in your procedures section of your complete rewrite of the original unit plan. ESOL PS’s: 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 24.

    Exams (30pts)—A mid-term and final exam covering course material will be given. The final exam will be cumulative. Students must achieve a 70% on the final exam to successfully complete the course. ESOL PS’s: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14, 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 25.

    C. Major Topics

    1.0 Historical and international perspectives of societal bilingualism

    1.1 The dimensions of bilingualism (Wei, 2000)

    1.2 Diglossia and code switching

    1.3 Pidgins, Creoles, Dialects and Standardness (Lippi-Green, 1997)

    1.4 Language as Prestige, Power and as marginalized "Other"

    1.5 Racism in education, multiculturalism, pluralism, equity and equalisms / dualisms

    2.0 The dimensions of bilingualism (theory, research & social), expanded from the 1.1 “teaser”

    2.1 What is SLA?

    2.2 What questions does SLA attempt to answer? And to whom are those questions a concern?

    2.3 First language acquisition and methods of language teaching (grammar-translation, direct

    approach, audiolingual method, natural approach, communicative approach, task-based language

    learning)

    2.4 Language issues that affect content-based teachers: emergence vs mastery, i + 1 vs ZPD,

    acculturalation, learnability vs teachability, acquisition rich environment, experiential vs analytic,

    communities of knowledge, speech communities (Dicker, 2003)

    2.5 How does SLA fit within debates on Second language learning: Parallel monolingualisms vs. bilingualism

    2.6 BICS & CALP

    3.0 Language Varieties

    3.1 What are language varieties? A linguistic perspective - registers of language use; dialects,

    sociolects and ideolects

    3.2 A critical perspective - language hegemony, linguistic inequalities and cultural disempowerment

    in educational settings; (D)discourse practices

    3.3 Language and politics; ebonics, English only laws

    3. 4 Reconciliation vs embracing the conflict

    4.0 Phonology, Phonetics & Phonics: Applications of “the nucleus” of linguistic subfields

    4.1 Standardness, Accents and the “Sound House”: An introduction to phonology (Lippi-Green, 1997)

    4.2 Phonetics and the application of IPA (West, 2008; Small, 2005)

    4.3 Phonics

    5.0 Applying other linguistics subfields: From big to small

    5.1 Discourse, Pragmatics and Non-verbal communication (read ESOL pdfs and Katz & Da Silva Iddings, 2009, “Classroom positionings”)

    5.2 Semantics (West, 2008)

    5.3 Syntax (West, 2008)

    5.4 Morphology (West, 2008; Mackey’s “Description of Bilingualism,” 2000)

    6.0 Literacy

    6.1 What is literacy?

    6.2 Types of literacy (critical, functional, visual, technological, bi/multicultural, educational)

    6.3 Taking a critical stance. Developing skills in deconstructionism. Deconstructing syllabi, tests,

    texts, and school practices

    6.4 Coping with non-standard varieties of language use in educational contexts; signs, tokenism,

    stereotyping, reacting to difference, textual production

    6.5 Empowerment agents in education

    7.0 Emergent Literacy

    7.1 Emergent literacy

    7.2 Vocabulary

    7.3 Oral language development

    8.0 Reading and Writing

    8.1 What is reading / writing?

    8.2 L1 and L2 reading

    8.3 Reading and writing connections

    8.4 SLA and reading / writing processes

    8.5 Freireism; reading / writing the word, reading / writing the world

    8.6 Teaching reading and writing skills to ELL students through content-based courses

    9.0 Synthesis of inclusive instructional practices

    9.1 Descriptions of workable literacy practices

    9.2 Case study analysis

    9.3 Fieldwork

    9.4 L1/L2 assessment

    D. Textbooks

    • Peregoy, S.F. & Boyle, O.F. (2008). Reading, writing, and learning in ESL: A resource book for K-12 teachers. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.

    • West, S. L. (2008). Linguistics for educators: A practical guide. Richmond, CA: IILC.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Readings from: PDFs as posted on Blackboard: Class notes and lectures cannot be shared or sold.

    o Dicker, S. J. (2003). Languages in America: A pluralist view (2nd ed.). Clevedon, England: Multilingual Matters.

    o Katz, L. & DaSilva Iddings, C. (2009). Classroom positionings and children’s construction of linguistic and racial identities in English-dominant classrooms in R. Kubota & A. Lin (Eds.), Race, culture, and identities in second language education: Exploring critically engaged practice (pp. 138-57). London/NewYork: Routledge.

    o Lippi-Green, R. (1997). English with an accent: Language, ideology, and discrimination in the United States. London/New York: Routledge.

    o Mackey, W. F. (2000). The description of bilingualism. In L. Wei, (Ed.), The bilingualism reader (pp. 26-54). London/New York: Routledge.

    o Small, L. H. (2005). Fundamentals of phonetics: A practical guide for students. Boston: Pearson.

    o Wei, L. (2000). Dimensions of bilingualism. In L. Wei, (Ed.), The bilingualism reader (pp. 3-25). London/New York: Routledge.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    The final grade will be based on the following 100-point scale: Grades will be assigned using the following standard:

    (a) Debriefings/Reading strategy/Attendance 20%

    (b) Performance tests 30%

    (c) Case study portfolio 30%

    (d) ELL analysis*

    (e) Aspects of Literacy*

    (f) ESOL-infused unit plan* 20%

    Final Grades will be assigned using the following standard:

    Grade Point Value Score Grade Point Value Score Grade Point Value Score

    A+ 4.00 100-97% A 4.00 96-93% A- 3.67 92-90%

    B+ 3.33 89-87% B 3.00 86-83% B- 2.67 82-80%

    C+ 2.33 79-77% C 2.00 76-73% C- 1.67 72-70%

    D+ 1.33 69-67% D 1.00 66-63% D- .67 62-60%

    F 0 59%- lower

    *Core Task for course – to go into Chalk and Wire

    Note: All assignments must be completed on time to receive full credit. Late assignments will result in losing one letter grade for each week late. NO LATE WORK will be accepted after the last day of class.

    *Critical/core Task for course--In compliance with national and state-approved program standards, the Foreign Language Education Faculty of the USF College of Education (COEDU) has identified a set of critical tasks that students must satisfactorily complete prior to graduation. These critical tasks are aligned with the Preprofessional Benchmarks for the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices and closely articulated with the COEDU Conceptual Framework.

    Note: All assignments must be completed on time to receive full credit. Late assignments will result in losing one letter grade for each week late.

    Assignment Descriptions:

    Attendance

    Presence and participation are crucial facets of a seminar. Participants should make effort to attend all sessions. Students missing more than two class sessions may be withdrawn from the course. Lateness or early departure will be considered an absence.

    Individual Meetings

    Students need to schedule short one-on-one meetings with the instructor. Your instructor wishes to meet you individually so that your goals, philosophy, and ideas may be discussed. Details on availability and duration of these meetings will be announced soon.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Week 1

    Module 0: Course Orientation

    To-Do List

    Access the Course Website

    Get the textbooks

    Read: the Syllabus carefully

    Assignments Due End of Wk 1: Orientation Quiz 0

    Week 2

    Module 1: Historical and international perspectives of societal bilingualism

    To-Do List

    Read: Peregoy & Boyle (2008). chapter 1; Wei (2000); Lippi-Green (1997)

    Assignments Due End of Wk 2: e-Log Entry 1; Quiz 1: Reading Response 1

    Week 3

    Module 2: The dimensions of bilingualism (theory, research & social), expanded from the 1.1 “teaser”

    To-Do List

    Read: Peregoy & Boyle (2008), Chapters 2 and 8; Dicker (2003);

    Assignments Due End of Wk 3: e-Log Entry 2; Quiz 2 ; Reading Response 2

    Week 4

    Module 3: Language Varieties

    To-Do List

    Read: Peregoy & Boyle (2008), Ch 8

    Watch: Do You Speak American? Video Lesson

    Assignments Due End of Wk 4: e-Log Entry 3; Quiz 3; Reading Response 3; Lesson Objectives Modification Activity 1

    Week 5

    Module 4: Phonology, Phonetics & Phonics: Applications of “the nucleus” of linguistic subfields

    To-Do List

    Read: Peregoy & Boyle (2008), Ch 5; Lippi-Green (1997); West (2008); Small (2005)

    Assignments Due End of Wk 5: e-Log Entry 4; Quiz 4; Reading Response 4; Lesson bjectives Modification Activity 2

    Week 6

    Module 5: Applying other linguistics subfields: From big to small

    To-Do List

    Read: Katz & Da Silva (2009); West (2008); Mackey (2000)

    Assignments Due End of Wk 6: e-Log Entry 5; Quiz 5; Reading Response 5; Lesson Objectives Modification Activity 3

    Week 7

    Assignments Due End of Wk 7

    Unit Plan

    Portfolio Draft

    Midterm Exam

    Week 8

    Module 6: Literacy

    To-Do List

    Read: Peregoy & Boyle (2008), Ch. 8-10

    Assignments Due End of Wk 8: e-Log Entry 6; Quiz 6; Reading Response 6

    Weeks 9 & 10

    Module 7: Emergent Literacy

    To-Do List

    Read: Peregoy & Boyle (2008), Ch 5

    Assignments Due End of Wk 9: e-Log Entry 7; Quiz 7; Reading Response 7

    Assignments Due End of Wk 10: ELL Analysis

    Weeks 11 & 12

    Module 8: Reading and Writing

    To-Do List

    Read: Peregoy & Boyle (2008), Ch. 7 &8

    Assignments Due End of Wk 11: e-Log Entry 8; Quiz 8; Reading Response 8

    Assignments Due End of Wk 12: Aspects of Literacy

    Weeks 13 & 14

    Module 9: Synthesis of inclusive instructional practices

    To-Do List

    Read: Peregoy & Boyle (2008), Ch. 11

    Assignments Due End of Wk 13: e-Log Entry 9; Quiz 9; Reading Response 9

    Assignments Due End of Wk 14: Case Study

    Final Week

    To-Do List

    Make sure you have submitted your core assignments to C&W

    Complete our Course Evaluation

    Assignments Due End of Wk 15: Portfolio Final Version; Fieldwork based Term Project; Final Exam on Campus (location and time TBA)

    H. Attendance Policy

    Attendance

    Presence and participation are crucial facets of a seminar. Participants should make effort to attend all sessions. Students missing more than two class sessions may be withdrawn from the course. Lateness or early departure will be considered an absence.

    Religious Observances: All students, faculty, and staff within the USF System have a right to expect reasonable accommodation of their religious observances, practices and beliefs.

    The USF System will, at the beginning of each academic term, provide written notice of the class schedule and formal examination periods. The USF System, through its faculty, will make every attempt to schedule required classes and examinations in view of customarily observed religious holidays of those religious groups or communities comprising the USF System’s constituency.

    Students are expected to attend classes and take examinations as determined by the USF System.

    No student shall be compelled to attend class or sit for an examination at a day or time prohibited by his or her religious belief. However, students should review the course requirements and meeting days and times to avoid foreseeable conflicts, as excessive absences in a given term may prevent a student from completing the academic requirements of a specific course.

    Students are expected to notify their instructors at the beginning of each academic term if they intend to be absent for a class or announced examination, in accordance with this policy. Students absent for religious reasons, as noticed to the instructor at the beginning of each academic term, will be given reasonable opportunities to make up any work missed. In the event that a student is absent for religious reasons on a day when the instructor collects work for purposes of grading (homework, pop quiz, etc.), the student shall be given a reasonable opportunity to make up such work or shall not have that work averaged into the student's grade at the discretion of the instructor.

    Any student who believes that he or she has been treated unfairly with regard to the above may seek review of a complaint through established USF System Academic Grievance Procedures (found in the Graduate and Undergraduate Catalogs) and those provided by the University's Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    “Plagiarism is defined as "literary theft" and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact

    words of a published text or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a

    published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from

    books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not

    generally known to the public-at-large, must be attributed to its author by means of the

    appropriate citation procedure. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text.

    Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one's own, segments or the total of another person's

    work.”

    “Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may

    include receipt of an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the "F" shall

    be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student

    a grade of "F" of "FF" (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.”

    Note: All assignments must be completed on time to receive full credit. Late assignments will result in losing one letter grade for each week late. NO LATE WORK will be accepted after the last day of class.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    This course supports a new MAT - FLE track that does not include the ESOL Endorsement


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    none



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.