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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EDF7491

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2011-05-10
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: GC reviewed- pending correction to objectives. Recd. GC approved 2/21/11. USF System notification 3/11/11. To SCNS 3/17/11. Approved effective 5/1/11. posted in banner


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2401 2010-11-03
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Educational Measurement and Research ED 171100000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Liliana Rodríguez-Campos 9741163 liliana@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EDF 7491 Consulting and Project Management Skills for Evaluators

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Consulting Project Management
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    EDF 7485

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    In-depth study of consulting and management skills applied to highly complex evaluations; techniques to use and control resources such as scope, time, risk, communications, and human resource management in a broad range of evaluation activities.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Given the extensive benefits of consulting and project management in education and related fields, it is anticipated that many students in the program and from other programs and colleges will choose this course as an elective.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 1 time

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Doctoral degree in Educational Measurement and Research or related field; specialization coursework in evaluation methods; experience conducting evaluations and metaevaluations; and meet the Department criteria for teaching doctoral level courses in the area of evaluation.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Identify and define concepts frequently used in consulting and project management. CF 2; AEAGP B.

    2. Review and critique current consulting and project management literature. CF 2, 4; AEAGP B.

    3. Apply the knowledge and skills of consulting and project management in evaluations. CF 4; AEAGP A.

    4. Employ tools and techniques of consulting and project management in a broad range of evaluation activities. CF 2, 4; AEAGP A, B.

    5. Apply the five project management processes; initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing to manage evaluations. CF 4; AEAGP A.

    6. Use the nine knowledge areas of project management; project integration, project scope, project time, project cost, project quality, project human resources, project communications, project risk management, and project procurement to manage evaluations. CF 4; AEAGP A.

    7. Demonstrate ability to develop a consulting and project management report. CF 2; AEAGP A, B.

    CF denotes the College of Education Conceptual Framework and AEAGP denotes the American Evaluation Association Guiding Principles for Evaluators.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1.Identify and define concepts frequently used in consulting and project management.

    2.Review and critique current consulting and project management literature.

    3.Apply the knowledge and skills of consulting and project management in evaluations.

    4.Employ tools and techniques of consulting and project management in a broad range of evaluation activities.

    5.Apply the five project management processes; initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing to manage evaluations

    6.Use the nine knowledge areas of project management; project integration, project scope, project time, project cost, project quality, project human resources, project communications, project risk management, and project procurement to manage evaluations.

    7.Demonstrate ability to develop a consulting and project management report.

    C. Major Topics

    1.Fundamentals of consulting and project management skills for evaluators

    2.Project management processes

    3.Areas of project management

    4.Tools and techniques of consulting and project management

    5.How to plan and start a consulting business

    D. Textbooks

    PMI Standards Committee (2009). A guide to the project management body of knowledge: PMBOK Guide (4th Ed.). Project Management Institute: Alibris.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Wholey, J. S., Newcomer, K. E., & Hatry, H. P. (Eds.). (2010). Handbook of practical program evaluation (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

    Kerzner, H. (2009). Project management: A systems approach to planning, scheduling, and controlling (10th ed.). New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

    Kuehn, U. (2006). Integrated Cost and Schedule Control in Project Management. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

    Lewis, J. P. (2006). The project manager’s desk reference: Comprehensive guide to project planning, scheduling, evaluation, and systems. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

    Lewis, J. P. (2010). Project planning, scheduling, and control: A hands-on guide to bringing projects in on time and on budget (5th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

    Pinto, J. K. & Trailer, J. W. (1999). Essentials of project control. Silva, NC: The Project Management Institute, Inc.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Class Activities 10 % 10 points

    Presentation 20 % 20 points

    Midterm Examination 20 % 20 points

    Final Report 40 % 40 points

    Final Presentation 10 % 10 points

    Total: 100 % 100 points

    Grades will be assigned on the following basis:

    A 90 – 100

    B 80 – 89

    C 70 – 79

    D 60 – 69

    1.Class Activities: Periodically students working individually or in groups will be given the opportunity to practice the material learned in class. These in-class assignments are designed to simulate and replicate real-life problems, challenges, and decisions related to the course topics.

    2.Presentation: Students working individually or in groups will present and discuss issues inherent to this course (if one member then one presentation, if two members then two presentations, etc.). This will help identify literature bases that students need in order to frame, design and conduct their own work. The maximum time for this presentation is 20 minutes with unlimited time for questions/comments afterwards from the audience. Please provide a copy of any relevant material to the audience (e.g., PowerPoint handouts).

    3.Midterm Examination: Students working individually will write a review of a course related book. (1) Summarize major arguments of the literature being reviewed, and then reflect upon: (2) how its content relates to your experience, and (3) does the content make sense (and why)? Please write a four-page report (minimum 1 page per question) and make a presentation to the class (e.g., PowerPoint, posters). The maximum time for this presentation is five minutes with unlimited time for questions/comments afterwards from the audience. Please submit an electronic-copy (e.g., pdf, word).

    4.Final Report: Students working individually will develop a report that links the information learned in this course to their own specific field of interest. The length of this report is “minimum” ten single-spaced pages of content. Please submit an electronic-copy (e.g., pdf, word) of this final report. An example of the outline for this report will be discussed the first day of classes.

    5.Final Presentation. For the presentation of the final report, students are encouraged to use visual aids (e.g., PowerPoint presentations, posters) to enhance the quality of their presentations. The maximum time for this presentation is five minutes with unlimited time for questions/comments afterwards from the audience. I will be glad to advice students with little experience in this area. Please provide a copy of any relevant material to the audience.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Introduction to consulting and project management skills for evaluators.

    Review of consulting and project management information and its applicability to evaluation.

    Project time management and other key issues (e.g., SWOTs, WBS, RAM, charts, network diagrams, management map).

    Students focus and frame their course interest.

    Using Microsoft Project to manage evaluations.

    Project management context in evaluations (e.g., project phases and life cycle; stakeholders; organizational influences; key general management skills; socioeconomic influences).

    Project management processes in evaluations (e.g., project processes; process groups; process interactions; customizing process interactions).

    Project integration management in evaluations (e.g., project plan development; project plan execution; overall change control).

    Project scope management in evaluations (e.g., initiation; scope planning, definition, verification, and change control).

    Students discuss the progress of their final report.

    Midterm Exam.

    Students discuss the progress of their final report.

    Project cost management in evaluations

    (e.g., resource planning; cost estimating; cost budgeting; cost control)

    Project quality management in evaluations

    (e.g., quality planning; quality assurance; quality control)

    Project human resource management in evaluations

    (e.g., organizational planning; staff acquisition; team development)

    Students discuss the progress of their final report.

    How to plan and start a consulting business

    (e.g., characteristics of entrepreneurs; benefits of being a consultant; startup checklist; write a business plan; legal structures of business; avoiding the pitfalls of small business failure; startup checklist)

    Project communications management in evaluations

    (e.g., communications planning; information distribution; performance reporting; administrative closure)

    Project risk management in evaluations

    (e.g., risk identification; risk quantification; risk response development; risk response control)

    Project procurement management in evaluations

    (e.g., procurement and solicitation planning; source selection; contract administration; contract close-out)

    Students discuss the progress of their final report.

    How to plan and start a consulting business (Cont.).

    Students discuss the progress of their final report.

    Final presentation and report due today.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    All students have a right to expect that the University will reasonably accommodate their religious observances, practices, and beliefs. Students are expected to notify the instructor in writing by the second class if they intend to be absent for a class or announced examination, in accordance with this policy.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    I believe that we are all held accountable for meeting deadlines, so I will be firm in my requirement to get work in on time. An assignment is late when it is submitted one day or later beyond the due date. Your grade on any late assignment will be reduced 10 percent for each day it is late. If an unexpected emergency does arise and you cannot get your assignment in on time, it is your responsibility to contact me in advance of the due date, as feasible, to avoid a reduction in your grade.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Measurement and Evaluation, Ph.D. and Ed.S.


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    • Adult Education

    • Educational Leadership

    • Higher Education

    • School Psychology

    • Special Education

    • Instructional Technology

    • Secondary Education



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.