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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EDF7462

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2011-05-10
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: GC reviewed- pending correction to objectives; recd. GC approved 2/21/11. USF System notification 3/11/11; to SCNS 3/17/11. Apprd eff 5/1/11. posted in banner


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2400 2010-11-03
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Educational Measurement and Research ED 171100000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Liliana Rodríguez-Campos 9741163 liliana@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EDF 7462 Metaevaluation

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    4 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Metaevaluation
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 100

    Prerequisites

    EDF 7940

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    In-depth study of the theory and practice of metaevaluation; planned field applications of principles of metaevaluation; and use of metaevaluation checklists and standards of quality for professional practice to conduct metaevaluations.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    Given the extensive benefits of metaevaluations in education and related fields, it is anticipated that many students in the program and from other programs will choose this course as an elective.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 3 or more times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Doctoral degree in Educational Measurement and Research or related field; specialization coursework in evaluation methods; experience conducting evaluations and metaevaluations; and meet the Department criteria for teaching doctoral level courses in the area of evaluation.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Describe the purpose and role of metaevaluation within the evaluation discipline. CF 2; AEAGP B.

    2. Describe, distinguish among, and critically evaluate different approaches for conducting metaevaluations. CF 2, 4; AEAGP A, B.

    3. Analyze the potential strengths and weaknesses of conducting metaevaluations. CF 4; AEAGP A, B.

    4. Review and critique current metaevaluation literature. CF 2, 4; AEAGP B.

    5. Identify and describe the major sections of the metaevaluation report. CF 2; AEAGP B.

    6. Demonstrate a command of and apply professional standards in judging evaluation reports. CF 2, 4; AEAGP A, B.

    7. Use metaevaluation checklists for judging evaluations. CF 4; AEAGP A.

    8. Demonstrate ability to critique metaevaluation reports. CF 2, 4; AEAGP A, B.

    9. Demonstrate ability to plan, conduct, and report a multiple-site metaevaluation. CF 2, 4; AEAGP A, B.

    *CF denotes the College of Education Conceptual Framework and AEAGP denotes the American Evaluation Association Guiding Principles for Evaluators.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1.Describe the purpose and role of metaevaluation within the evaluation discipline.

    2.Describe, distinguish among, and critically evaluate different approaches for conducting metaevaluations.

    3.Analyze the potential strengths and weaknesses of conducting metaevaluations.

    4.Review and critique current metaevaluation literature

    5.Identify and describe the major sections of the metaevaluation report.

    6.Demonstrate a command of and apply professional standards in judging evaluation reports.

    7.Use metaevaluation checklists for judging evaluations.

    8.Demonstrate ability to critique metaevaluation reports.

    9.Demonstrate ability to plan, conduct, and report a multiple-site metaevaluation.

    C. Major Topics

    1.Principles of the theory of metaevaluation

    2.Feasibility and constraints of metaevaluation

    3.Components of the metaevaluation report

    4.The metaevaluation process

    5.Metaevaluation checklists

    D. Textbooks

    Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation(2010). The program evaluation standards: A guide for evaluators and evaluation users. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

    Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation (2008). The personnel evaluation standards. Corwin Press, CA: Sage Publications Company.

    Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation (2002). The student evaluation standards: How to Improve Evaluations of Students. Corwin Press, CA: Sage Publications Company.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Students will be expected to do outside readings related to the topical outline. For example, http://www.eval.org/Resources/bibliography.asp

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Presentations 15 % 15 points Class Participation 10 % 10 points

    Oral Progress Reports 30 % 30 points

    Metaevaluation Report 45 % 45 points

    Total: 100 % 100 points

    Grades will be assigned on the following basis:

    A 90 – 100

    B 80 – 89

    C 70 – 79

    D 60 – 69

    1.Presentations: Students will discuss on a particular metaevaluation reading (1 minute for each group and unlimited time for questions), and distribute the briefing sheet to the class. Students are encouraged to make visual aids to enhance the quality of their presentations. I will be glad to advise students with little experience in this area.

    2.Class Participation: Each student is expected to participate in course discussions and activities, through questions, critiques, illustrations, suggestions, and other forms of feedback (e.g., alternative interpretations of ideas). Students will prepare a critical review of their classmates’ metaevaluation reports, and note the strengths and weaknesses of each report.

    3.Oral progress Report: Students will implement their metaevaluations and present weekly oral progress reports to the class.

    4.Final metaevaluation report: Students will work together to prepare a final metaevaluation report and present it to the class (both written and oral reports are required). The length of this metaevaluation report is about thirty double-spaced pages. All materials (except briefing sheets) should be prepared using a common word processing program (to be determined and agreed upon by students). Please, provide an electronic copy (e.g., pdf) of the final report and handouts. An example of the outline for this type of report will be distributed the first day of classes.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Session 1: Main Activities

    • Clarify the course’s aims, prerequisites, schedule, student responsibilities, and grading criteria.

    • Assign and distribute the evaluation reports.

    • Organize the participants’ metaevaluation team.

    • Discuss the team’s organization and work plan for producing the metaevaluation report (divide table of contents among students).

    • Present an overview of the theory of metaevaluation.

    • Think about how the team can organize to produce a metaevaluation of the evaluation reports.

    o Clarify responsibilities (i.e., questions/answers time).

    o Determine how CEO teams are dividing your responsibilities.

    o Determine how the evaluation report teams are dividing their responsibilities.

    o Plan CEO Strategies to accomplish tasks and work on activities to be posted in blackboard.

    o Recommendations for positive behavior

    Session 2: Main Activities

    • Student-led discussion of briefing on his/her particular metaevaluation reading and distribution of briefing sheet.

    • Discuss Feasibility & Constraints of the Metaevaluation.

    • Assess issues regarding each student’s metaevaluation assignment, focused especially on the description of each of the evaluation reports.

    • Discuss issues regarding each student’s metaevaluation assignment, focused especially on the purposes, and questions addressed by each of the evaluation reports.

    • Class discussion to refine the outline for the metaevaluation report, formatting, etc.

    • Agreement on Standards to Judge the Evaluation (e.g., conservative rigor, moderate rigor)

    • Assess progress and issues regarding each student’s metaevaluation assignment, focused especially on the evaluation methods employed by each of the evaluation reports.

    • Think about how the metaevaluation report will be put together (i.e., each part).

    • Teamwork to put together the section describing and providing comparative charts on each of the evaluation reports (purposes and questions). Collect information about the description of each Report

    • Work on the assigned part of the final metaevaluation report and other CEO activities.

    Session 3: Main Activities

    • Student-led discussion of briefing on his/her particular metaevaluation reading and distribution of briefing sheet.

    • Discuss how information is going to be collected about Introduction, and Consumer Report Analysis.

    • Determine and arrange to interact with the metaevaluation’s stakeholders (if needed), and submit questions for them (if needed)

    • Teamwork to put together the Comparative Analysis section (narrative and charts on methods, and strengths), and final review of this section.

    • Discuss information needs about Introduction.

    • Teamwork to put together the Comparative Analysis section (charts on weaknesses), and final review of this section.

    • Work on the assigned part of the final metaevaluation report and other CEO activities.

    Session 4: Main Activities

    • Student-led discussion of briefing on his/her particular metaevaluation reading and distribution of briefing sheet.

    • Discuss information needs about Introduction, Consumer Report Analysis, and Synthesis

    • Final review of Description of Each Report

    • Teamwork to put together Introduction

    • Final review of Introduction

    • Discuss information needs about Recommendations and Synthesis

    • Teamwork to put together Synthesis

    • Address final unexpected issues that may interfere with delivering the final metaevaluation report on time.

    • Work on the assigned part of the final metaevaluation report and other CEO activities.

    Session 5: Main Activities

    • Student-led discussion of briefing on his/her particular metaevaluation reading and distribution of briefing sheet.

    • Teamwork to put together Consumer Report Analysis

    • Final review of Consumer Report Analysis narrative and charts

    • Discuss information needs about Executive Summary and Cover Letter.

    • Teamwork to put together Recommendations.

    • Last day to submit information for Executive Summary and Cover Letter

    • Final review of Synthesis and Recommendations.

    • Work on the assigned part of the final metaevaluation report and other CEO activities.

    Session 6: Main Activities

    • Student-led discussion of briefing on his/her particular metaevaluation reading and distribution of briefing sheet.

    • Discuss formatting and brainstorm titles for report. Review and critique the semifinal draft of the overall report, and make corrections as needed

    • Teamwork to put together Executive Summary and Cover Letter.

    • Review and critique the semifinal draft of the overall report, and make corrections as needed.

    • Work on the assigned part of the final metaevaluation report and other CEO activities.

    Session 7: Main Activities

    • Final review of Executive Summary and Cover Letter

    • Final review of the overall report.

    • Distribution of the final metaevaluation report to the team and the professor.

    • Teamwork to finalize PowerPoint slides and present them to the class (if client chooses to meet with the team).

    • Reflection on the class experiences.

    • Consultation

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    All students have a right to expect that the University will reasonably accommodate their religious observances, practices, and beliefs. Students are expected to notify the instructor in writing by the second class if they intend to be absent for a class or announced examination, in accordance with this policy.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    I believe that we are all held accountable for meeting deadlines, so I will be firm in my requirement to get work in on time. An assignment is late when it is submitted one day or later beyond the due date. Your grade on any late assignment will be reduced 10 percent for each day it is late. If an unexpected emergency does arise and you cannot get your assignment in on time, it is your responsibility to contact me in advance of the due date, as feasible, to avoid a reduction in your grade.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Measurement and Evaluation, Ph.D. and Ed.S.


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    • Adult Education

    • Educational Leadership

    • Higher Education

    • School Psychology

    • Special Education

    • Instructional Technology

    • Secondary Education



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.