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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - APK6109

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2011-05-10
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: College approval received 3/31/10; Grad Council review 5/17/10; need learning outcomes; terminal degree info added; Updated - Approved 3/21/11. to System 3/24/11. SCNS 4/1/11. Apprd eff 5/15/11. Subm 6352. Appd 6369. Field change PET 6369 to APK 6109


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2307 2010-03-19
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Physical Education & Exercise Science ED 173200 Physical Education & Exercise Science
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Bill Campbell 9743443 campbell@coedu.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    APK 6109 Cardiorespiratory Aspects of Exercise Physiology

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Cardiorespiratory Ex. Phys.
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    None.

    Corequisites

    None.

    Course Description

    Covers selected topics regarding cardiorespiratory aspects of exercise physiology. Some of the topics to be covered include: gas exchange and transport during exercise; aerobic metabolism, and acute & chronic adaptations to exercise training.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for new program/concentration/certificate

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course was offered in the fall 2008 as an experimental course and enrolled approximately 20 students.

    Similar enrollment would be expected moving forward.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 2 times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    In addition to a terminal degree, qualified instructors must have Graduate coursework in the area of the course.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    6.1 Knowledge of the historical roots and foundational principles in exercise physiology.

    6.2 Ability to locate, read, and interpret exercise physiology literature.

    6.3 Knowledge of the gas laws and how they relate to a biological system.

    6.4 Knowledge of gas exchange and transport.

    6.5 Knowledge of pulmonary ventilation and the dynamics of pulmonary ventilation.

    6,6 Knowledge of oxidative phosphorylation and its role in ATP synthesis.

    6.7 Knowledge of the physiologic factors associated with aerobic performance.

    6.8 Knowledge of the acute and chronic adaptations resulting from aerobic training.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    6.1 Knowledge of the historical roots and foundational principles in exercise physiology.

    6.2 Ability to locate, read, and interpret exercise physiology literature.

    6.3 Knowledge of the gas laws and how they relate to a biological system.

    6.4 Knowledge of gas exchange and transport.

    6.5 Knowledge of pulmonary ventilation and the dynamics of pulmonary ventilation.

    6,6 Knowledge of oxidative phosphorylation and its role in ATP synthesis.

    6.7 Knowledge of the physiologic factors associated with aerobic performance.

    6.8 Knowledge of the acute and chronic adaptations resulting from aerobic training.

    C. Major Topics

    Pulmonary ventilation; Dynamics of pulmonary ventilation; Oxygen delivery; Carbon dioxide transport; Acute and chronic adaptations to endurance exercise; aerobic metabolism.

    D. Textbooks

    Title: Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition, & Human erformance

    Authors: William MacArdle, Frank Katch, and Victor Katch

    Publisher: Human Kinetics: Champaign, IL

    Year: 2007

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Selected videos available via Google and YouTube.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Student Expectations:

    Students are expected to read all required materials in advance of each class meeting.

    Students are expected to attend class meetings regularly.

    Students are expected to participate in all Blackboard discussions.

    Students are expected to participate in classroom discussion.

    Grade Criteria:

    Written Examinations: 60%

    * composed exclusively of essay questions

    Participation: 10%

    * in class and online

    Research Paper: 30%

    * topic of choice

    *Note: rubrics for each grade area could not be added directly to this Acrobat form and are instead provided in section 8 of syllabus document.

    Percentages:

    A+ = 97.5 - 100, A = 92.5 - 97.49, A- = 90 - 92.49, B+ = 87.5 - 89.99,

    B = 82.5 - 87.49, B- = 80 - 82.49, C+ = 77.5 - 79.99, C = 72.5 - 77.49,

    C- = 70 - 72.49, D+ = 67.5 - 69.99, D = 62.5 - 67.49, D- = 60 - 62.49,

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Week 1: Introduction/Foundations; Conduct a ‘Focus Group’ comprised of the students in the class that addresses areas of need for learning cardiovascular aspects of exercise physiology.

    Week 2: Gas laws; coverage of atmospheric pressure and gases; Avogadro’s law, boyles’ law, charles’ law’ ideal gas law, Dalton’s law, and Henry’s law.

    Week 3: Pulmonary ventilation; coverage of the basics of respiration, pulmonary ventilation, as well as pulmonary volumes and capacities and the effects of exercise on these variables.

    Week 4: Dynamics of pulmonary ventilation; coverage of the respiratory control center, pulmonary ventilation and exercise.

    Week 5: Gas exchange and transport; coverage of alveolar diffusion, oxygen uptake along the pulmonary capillaries, and gas transport by the blood.

    Week 6: Cardiovascular system and regulation and integration; coverage of the heart, arterial system, and venous system; blood pressure response to exercise; myocardial metabolism.

    Week 7: Functional capacity of the cardiovascular system; coverage of cardiac output at rest and during exercise, blood flow and arterial-venous oxygen difference.

    Week 8: Exam 1; covering material from weeks 1-7

    Week 9: Venous blood, carbon dioxide, and acid base regulation

    Week 10: Aerobic metabolism and central importance in exercise physiology, coverage of ATP synthesis and the importance of maximizing metabolic flux during intense exercise.

    Week 11: Oxidative phosphorylation

    Week 12: Physiologic factors associated with aerobic performance

    Week 13: Physiology of aerobic training

    Week 14: Exercise physiology for special populations. Coverage of disease states including obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease.

    Week 15: Exam 2, covering material from weeks 8-14

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    Students are allowed to miss up to 2 class meetings without penalty. Each absence beyond 2 will result in a reduction of 2% from the final grade.

    Regarding observance of religious holidays: All students have a right to expect that the University will reasonably accommodate their religious observances, practices, and beliefs. Students are expected to notify the instructor in writing by the second class if they intend to be absent for a class or announced examination, in accordance with university policy.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    “Plagiarism is defined as "literary theft" and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact

    words of a published text or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a

    published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from

    books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not

    generally known to the public-at-large, must be attributed to its author by means of the

    appropriate citation procedure. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text.

    Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one's own, segments or the total of another person's

    work.”

    “Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may

    include receipt of an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the "F" shall

    be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student

    a grade of "F" of "FF" (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.”

    All students are expected to complete assignments according to the provided schedule and any work to be completed/submitted after the provided schedule must be approved in advance or the work will receive no academic credit.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    It is expected that this course would enroll approximately 15-20 students each time it is delivered. This course will be included in a menu of courses from which students will develop their Program of Study. It is expected that at least 2/3 of all Exercis


  5. Course Concurrence Information



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