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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - FLE7367

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2010-10-08
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: College approval 3/31; to Grad Coun. 5/17/10; needed correction to Learning Outcomes; rcvd 6/23/10; back to council for confirmation. GC approved 8/18/10. To SCNS 8/25/10. SCNS Approved. Nmbr changed from 7362 to 7367. Posted in Banner. Effective 10/1/10


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2296 2010-03-08
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Secondary Education ED 172400 Secondary Education
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Deoksoon Kim 8139744878 deoksoonk@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    FLE 7367 Sociocultural Theory in Second Language Acquisition

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Sociocultural Theory in SLA
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    N/A

    Corequisites

    N/A

    Course Description

    Examines the theoretical contributions of Vygotskian theory and explores the development of sociocultural theory based on Vygotsky and extending to contemporary post-Vygotskian theories and practices in the field of SLA.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Replacing Selected Topics with Permanent number; already listed in program

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    1. This is a core course for the SLA/IT program. SLA/IT students must take this course to complete their program of studies, but the course has only been offered as a social-topic course. The program of studies form for SLA/IT is attached.

    2. This course would serve a central role in preparing and supporting SLA/IT students’ examining the theoretical framework of sociocultural theory in the field of second language acquisition. They will not only understand Vygotsky’s socioculural theory and expand their knowledge to the contemporary post-Vygotskian theories, but also understand the interface between theories and practices in teaching and learning. Lev Vygotsky’s work has been a significant influence to the general educational field (e.g., educational psychology and educational thought) and in particular second language education. This course will provide the fundamental theories, so students will be able to develop their own theoretical framework of their enduring research, scholarship, and teaching.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 3 or more times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    A credentialed faculty with PH.D. in Second Language Education or other related to field, and a foundational understanding of research in sociocultural theory in the field of second language acquisition.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    6-1. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge of the development of sociocultural theory based on Vygotsky and extending to contemporary post-Vygotskian theories and practices.

    6-2. Learn to analyze, evaluate, and discuss the contributions of sociocultural theories to SLA and the ongoing interface between sociocultural research and language pedagogy.

    6-3. Acquire the theories and practices based on sociocultural theory in SLA to formulate, analyze, evaluate, and/or justify the students’ own theoretical framework

    6-4. Demonstrate adequate skills to identify a research topic related to sociocultural theory and literature pertaining to a specific topic

    6-5. Compose a conceptual paper or empirical research study of publishable quality.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1. Students will become familiar with key sociocultural theory in second language acquisition (SLA).

    2. Students will understand sociocultural theory in SLA and its impact on second-language instruction and research.

    3. Students will gain confidence in presenting information individually and collaboratively in both oral and written forms.

    C. Major Topics

    Content Outline:

    Topics will include history of sociocultural theory; the mind as a mediated cultural construct; higher and lower order cognition; the genetic method; cultural historical activity theory; the zone of proximal development (ZPD) and scaffolding; internalization; inner and private speech; the interface between sociocultural research and language pedagogy; regulation in first and other languages; language testing from a sociocultural perspective; dynamic assessment; identity in first and other languages; collaborative learning, prolepsis, and scaffolding; and the contribution of SCT to theories of SLA.

    Week 1: Primary source material

    Week 2: Key elements of cultural historical activity theory (CHAT)/sociocultural theory (SCT)

    Week 3: Intellectual lineages of CHAT/SCT; development of modern CHAT; discussion of linguistics of communicative activity

    Week 4: Vygotsky's genetic method

    Week 5: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Mediation

    Week 6: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Mediation in the arenas of language, conceptualization, metaphor, body and gesture

    Week 7: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Internalization (imitation, private speech, usage-based approaches to language acquisition)

    Week 8: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Cultural-historical activity theory

    Week 9: Zone of Proximal Development: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) and Expansive Learning

    Week 10: Perspectives on the production and consequence of theory in SLA

    Week 11: SCT pedagogy: Systemic-theoretical instruction and dynamic assessment

    Week 12: Emotions and affect, systemic transformation of learning environments

    Week 13: CHAT/SCT and other theories and language and learning; Halliday and systemic-functional linguistics; ecological linguistics

    Week 14: Perspectives and pedagogical practice in activity and L2 development

    Week 15: Second culture acquisition: Second language discourse: A Vygotskian perspective.

    D. Textbooks

    • Lantolf, J. P., & Thorne, S. L. (2006). Sociocultural theory and the sociogenesis of second language development. New York: Oxford University Press.

    • Block, D. (2003). The social turn in second language acquisition. Washington, DC; Georgetown University Press.

    This text critically examines fundamental knowledge and theories that underpin the

    Input-Interaction-output model and suggest a more interdisciplinary and socially informed approach to SLA research. It expands the SLA studies in an informed and interdisciplinary fashion. It also provides vital speculations about the future of

    SL

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Attachment 2: Course Readings, Online Resources, and other purchases (e.g. lab supplies, instruments, etc.)

    • Articles and other readings:

    Brown, K., & Cole, M. (2002). Cultural historical activity theory and the expansion of opportunities for learning after school. In G. Wells & G. Claxton (Eds.), Learning for life in the 21st century (pp. 225–238). Oxford: Blackwell.

    Byrnes, H. (2006). What kind of resource is language and why does it matter for advanced language learning? In H. Byrnes (Ed.), Advanced language learning: The contribution of Halliday and Vygotsky (pp. 1–28). London: Continuum.

    Cole, M. & Levitin, K. (2000). A cultural-historical view of human nature. In N. Roughley (Ed.), Being humans: Anthropological universality and particularity In transdisciplinary perspectives (pp. 64–80). New York, NY: deGruyter.

    de Guerrero, M. C. M., & Villamil, O. (2000). Activating the ZPD: Mutual scaffolding in L2 peer revision. Modern Language Journal, 84(1), 51–68.

    Donato, R. (1994). Collective scaffolding in second language learning. In J. P. Lantolf & G. Appel (Eds.), Vygotskian Approaches to Second Language Research (pp. 33–56). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

    Engeström , Y. (2001). Expansive learning at work: Toward an activity theoretical reconceptualization. Journal of Education and Work, 14, 133–156.

    Engeström, Y., Engeström, R., & Suntio, A. (2002). Can a school community learn to master its own future? An activity-theoretical study of expansive learning among middle school teachers. In G. Wells & G. Claxton (Eds.), Learning for life in the 21st century (pp. 211–224). Oxford: Blackwell.

    Frawley, W., & Lantolf, J. P. (1985). Second language discourse: A Vygotskyan perspective. Applied Linguistics, 6, 19–44.

    Guk, I., & Kellogg, D. (2007). The ZPD and whole class teaching: Teacher-led and student-led interactional mediation of tasks. Language Teaching Research, 11(3): 281–299.

    Halliday, M. A. K. (1993). Towards a language-based theory of learning. Linguistics and Education, 5(2), 93–116.

    Kinginger, C. (2002). Defining the zone of proximal development in US foreign language education. Applied Linguistics 23, 240–61.

    Kramsch, C. 2000. Social discourse constructions of self in L2 learning. In J. P. Lantolf (Ed.), Sociocultural theory and second language learning (pp. 134–153). Oxford: OUP.

    Lantolf, J. P. (2000). Introducing sociocultural theory. In J. P. Lantolf (Ed.) Sociocultural theory and second language learning (pp. 1–26). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Lantolf, J. P. (2003). Intrapersonal communication and internalization in the second language classroom. In A. Kozulin, B. Gindis, V. S. Ageyev, & S. M. Miller (Eds.), Vygotsky’s educational theory in cultural context (pp. 349–370). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Lantolf, J. P., & Pavlenko, A. (2001). (S)econd (L)anguage (A)activity. Understanding second language learners as people. In M. Breen (ed.) Learner contributions to language learning: New directions in research (pp. 141–158). London: Longman

    Lantolf, J. P. & Thorne, S. L. (2007). Sociocultural theory and second language acquisition. In. B. van Patten & J. Williams (eds.), Explaining second language acquisition (pp. 201–224). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Lantolf, J. P., & Thorne, S. L. (2006). Chapter 8, Activity theory: Theoretical framework. In Sociocultural theory and the sociogenesis of second language development. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

    Mahn, H., & John-Steiner, V. (2002). The gift of confidence: A Vygotskian view of emotions. In G. Wells & G. Claxton (Eds.), Learning for life in the 21st century (pp. 46–58). Oxford: Blackwell.

    Mitchell, R., & Myles, F. (1998). Chapter 7. In Second language learning theories. London: Edward Arnold.

    Pekarek Doeher, S. (2002). Mediation revisited: The socio-interactional organization of mediation in learning environments. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 9, 22–42.

    Ratner, C. (2004). Vygotsky's conception of psychological development. In R. Rieber & D. Robinson (Eds.), The essential Vygotsky (pp. 401–413). New York, NY: Kluwer/Plenum.

    Ratner, C. (1999). Three approaches to cultural psychology: A critique. Cultural Dynamics, 11, 7–31.

    Rieber, R. W. (Ed.). (1999). The collected works of L. S. Vygotsky (vol. 6, pp. 27–68).

    New York, NY: Kluwer/Plenum Scientific Legacy.

    Swain, M. (2006). Languaging, agency and collaboration in advanced second language proficiency. In H. Byrnes (Ed.), Advanced language learning: The contribution of Halliday and Vygotsky (pp. 95–108). London: Continuum.

    Thorne, S. L. (2000). Second language acquisition theory and the truth(s) about relativity. In J. P. Lantolf (Ed.), Sociocultural theory and second language learning (pp. 219–243). Oxford: OUP.

    Valsiner, J. (1997). Magical phrases, human development, and psychological ontology. In B. D. Cox and C. Lightfoot, (Eds.), Sociogenetic perspectives on internalization (pp. 237–254). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

    van Lier, L. (2000). From input to affordance: Social-interactive learning from an ecological perspective. In J. P. Lantolf (Ed.), Sociocultural theory and second language learning (pp. 245–260). Oxford: OUP. (Also, pedagogy)

    Wells, G. (2007). The mediating role of discoursing in activity. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 14(3): 160–177.

    Wells, G. (1999). Chapter 1: The complementary contributions of Halliday and Vygotsky

    to a “Language-based theory of learning.” In Dialogic inquiry: Toward a sociocultural practice and theory of education (p. 3–50). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Supplementary Readings:

    Aljaafreh, A., & Lantolf. J. P. (1994). Negative feedback as regulation and second language learning in the zone of proximal development. The Modern Language Journal, 78(4), 465–483.

    Bernstein, B. (1999). Vertical and horizontal discourse: an essay. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 20(2), 157–74.

    Chaiklin, S. (2003). The zone of proximal development in Vygotsky’s analysis of learning and instruction. In A. Kozulin, B. Gindis, V. Ageyev, & S. Miller (Eds.), Vygotsky’s educational theory in cultural context (pp. 39–64). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Coughlan, P. & Duff. P. A. (1994). Same task, different activities: Analysis of a SLA task from an activity theory perspective. In J. P. Lantolf & G. Appel, Vygotskian Approaches to Second Language Research (pp. 173–194). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

    Hasan, R. (manuscript) Semiotic mediation, language and society: Three exotropic theories—Vygotsky, Halliday and Bernstein.

    Lantolf, J. P. (2003). Intrapersonal communication and internalization in the second language classroom. In A. Kozulin, B. Gindis, V. S. Ageyev, & S. M. Miller (Eds.), Vygotsky’s educational theory in cultural context (pp. 349–370). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Lantolf, J. P. (1998). Second culture acquisition: Cognitive considerations. In E. Hinkel (Ed.) Culture in teaching and learning (pp. 28–42). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Lantolf, J. P., & Aljaafreh. A. (1995). Second language learning in the zone of proximal development: A revolutionary experience. International Journal of Educational Research, 23(7), 619–632.

    Lantolf, J. P., & Poehner, M. (2004). Dynamic assessment and L2 development: Bringing the past into the future. Journal of Applied Linguistics 1, 49–74.

    Mitchell, R., & Myles, F. (1998). Chapter 7. In Second language learning theories. London: Edward Arnold.

    Ohta, A. S. (2000). Rethinking interaction in SLA: Developmentally appropriate assistance in the zone of proximal development and the acquisition of L2 grammar. In J. P. Lantolf (Ed.), Sociocultural theory and second language learning (pp. 51–78). Oxford: OUP.

    Storch, N. (2002). Patterns of interaction in ESL pair work. Language Learning, 52, 119–158.

    Swain, M., & Lapkin. S. (1998). Interaction and second language learning: Two adolescent French immersion students working together. The Modern Language Journal 82, 320–337.

    Thorne, S. (2003). Artifacts and cultures-of-use in intercultural communication. Language Learning & Technology, 7(2): 38–67.

    Thorne, S. L., & Lantolf, J. P. (2006). A linguistics of communicative activity. In S. Makoni & A. Pennycook (Eds.), (Dis)inventing and (re)constituting language (pp. 170–195). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

    Verity, D. P. (2000). Side affects: The strategic development of professional satisfaction. In J. P. Lantolf (Ed.) Sociocultural theory and second language learning (pp. 179–197). Oxford: OUP.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Attachment 3: Course Outline including topics, assignments, exams/tests (including projected dates)

    Course Outline:

    Topics will include history of sociocultural theory; the mind as a mediated cultural construct; higher and lower order cognition; the genetic method; cultural historical activity theory; the zone of proximal development (ZPD) and scaffolding; internalization; inner and private speech; the interface between sociocultural research and language pedagogy; regulation in first and other languages; language testing from a sociocultural perspective; dynamic assessment; identity in first and other languages; collaborative learning, prolepsis, and scaffolding; and the contribution of SCT to theories of SLA.

    Week 1: Primary source material

    Week 2: Key elements of cultural historical activity theory (CHAT)/sociocultural theory (SCT)

    Week 3: Intellectual lineages of CHAT/SCT; development of modern CHAT; discussion of linguistics of communicative activity

    Week 4: Vygotsky's genetic method

    Week 5: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Mediation

    Week 6: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Mediation in the arenas of language, conceptualization, metaphor, body and gesture

    Week 7: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Internalization (imitation, private speech, usage-based approaches to language acquisition)

    Week 8: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Cultural-historical activity theory

    Week 9: Zone of Proximal Development: Core elements of cultural-historical psychology: Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) and Expansive Learning

    Week 10: Perspectives on the production and consequence of theory in SLA

    Week 11: SCT pedagogy: Systemic-theoretical instruction and dynamic assessment

    Week 12: Emotions and affect, systemic transformation of learning environments

    Week 13: CHAT/SCT and other theories and language and learning; Halliday and systemic-functional linguistics; ecological linguistics

    Week 14: Perspectives and pedagogical practice in activity and L2 development

    Week 15: Second culture acquisition: Second language discourse: A Vygotskian perspective.

    Assignments:

    Class Activities (10%): Completion of all assigned readings and active participation in seminar discussions. Students are required to participate in class discussion actively andattendance will be evaluated: interpretation & reactions to readings, opinions, analysis, synthesis, critiques, and beyond. Presence and participation are crucial facets of a seminar. Students should consult with an instructor in advance regarding any absences or problems that they encounter during the semester and should attend every class for the full time period. Absence(s), coming late, or leaving early from class significantly affects everyone’s ability to share their professionalism with their colleagues. Students should make every effort to attend all sessions. Lateness or early departure will be considered an absence. Students missing more than two class sessions may be withdrawn from the course.

    Online Activities (10%): Students participate in online discussion (blog) with illuminating interpretation and reaction to readings, opinions, analysis, synthesis, and critiques.

    Critical reading notes/discussion ideas to be kept on a blog (10 entries minimum in five different weeks), with one blog at least 300 words long

    Leading Two Discussions on Selected Topics (30%): Rubric will be provided to students.

    Students-led discussion after reading analyzing, evaluating, and critiquing assigned readings. Rubric will be provided (See appendix)

    A Seminar Paper (50%): Students compose a literature-based conceptual paper or conduct an empirical study based on sociocultural theory by selecting appropriate methods and collecting and analyzing data. A research study that utilizes sociocultural theory in some way, either for the development of an intervention or as a research framework to analyze data.

    Students are required to submit the seminar paper in two stages.

    Stage 1: An outline of the topic in prose, questions asked, and a listing of the resources compiled for the project.

    Stage 2: A completed seminar paper.

    Paper topics might include

    • A pedagogical proposal or implemented intervention

    • A theoretical inquiry

    • The theoretical framework or literature review for a masters or PhD thesis

    • A literature review of some aspect of SCT and SLA, literacy, or more general learning and development

    • A research study that utilizes sociocultural theory in some way, either for the development of an intervention or as a research framework to analyze data

    Papers may be done individually or collaboratively in pairs. Topics are open, but the professor will offer several suggestions that may be of interest. You should feel free to discuss your interests with the professor at any time. If you haven’t completed “IRB certification,” please do so as soon as possible. This will be necessary if you plan to undertake any empirical research involving human participants. If you have more specific questions regard to your IRB process, consult with your instructor. You may also need to submit for IRB, including consent forms to be signed by the participants. In all cases, the papers will be assessed according to criteria normally used by refereed journals.

    Evaluation: In this course, evaluation is a mutually constructed process rooted in ways to benefit from the experience, as listed above, and assignments, as listed below. Students are responsible for demonstrating their learning by extensive reading, critical thinking, active participation in and facilitation of class discussions; writing; sharing writing; critiquing writing; engaging in the many facets of inquiry; participating in individual, small-, and large-group activities; remaining flexible by demonstrating an understanding of the notion that curriculum is negotiating and negotiated; successfully completing all assignments; being tolerant of many points of view; demonstrating openness to critiquing and stretching their own ideas; and presenting formal in-class presentations.

    Course Completion: An “I” grade will only be considered by the instructors for students with otherwise excellent attendance and only for documented cases of unequivocally unavoidable situations (i.e., hospitalization or family death). Students should petition by e-mail—within 2 days of the precipitating event—explaining the circumstance. The document to be submitted for verification will be explained.

    Course Requirements and Policies

    Students are expected to assume individual responsibility and initiative in all work related to the class. Students are required to upload all assignments completed in this course to Blackboard and to submit hard copies of all assignments. Students are expected to successfully complete the following assignments and activities.

    Information from learning outcomes field: Attachment 1: Student Learning Outcomes

    Student learning outcomes will be demonstrated and assess using the following methods: 1) class activities, 2) leading two discussions on selected topics, 3) online activities, and 4) a seminar paper.

    Class Activities (10%): Completion of all assigned readings and active participation in seminar discussions. Students are required to participate in class discussion actively and attendance will be evaluated: interpretation & reactions to readings, opinions, analysis, synthesis, critiques, and beyond.

    Presence and participation are crucial facets of a seminar. Students should consult with an instructor in advance regarding any absences or problems that they encounter during the semester and should attend every class for the full time period. Absence(s), coming late, or leaving early from class significantly affects everyone’s ability to share their professionalism with their colleagues. Students should make every effort to attend all sessions. Lateness or early departure will be considered an absence. Students missing more than two class sessions may be withdrawn from the course.

    Online Activities (10%): Students participate in online discussion (blog) with illuminating interpretation and reaction to readings, opinions, analysis, synthesis, and critiques.

    Critical reading notes/discussion ideas to be kept on a blog (10 entries minimum in five different weeks), with one blog at least 300 words long

    Leading Two Discussions on selected topics (30%): Rubric will be provided to students.

    Students-led discussion after reading analyzing, evaluating, and critiquing assigned readings. Rubric will be provided (See appendix)

    A Seminar Paper (50%): Students compose a literature-based conceptual paper or conduct an empirical study based on sociocultural theory by selecting appropriate methods and collecting and analyzing data. A research study that utilizes sociocultural theory in some way, either for the development of an intervention or as a research framework to analyze data.

    Students are required to submit the seminar paper in two stages.

    Stage 1: An outline of the topic in prose, questions asked, and a listing of the resources compiled for the project.

    Stage 2: A completed seminar paper.

    Paper topics might include

    • A pedagogical proposal or implemented intervention

    • A theoretical inquiry

    • The theoretical framework or literature review for a masters or PhD thesis

    • A literature review of some aspect of SCT and SLA, literacy, or more general learning and development

    • A research study that utilizes sociocultural theory in some way, either for the development of an intervention or as a research framework to analyze data

    Papers may be done individually or collaboratively in pairs. Topics are open, but the professor will offer several suggestions that may be of interest. You should feel free to discuss your interests with the professor at any time. If you haven’t completed “IRB certification,” please do so as soon as possible. This will be necessary if you plan to undertake any empirical research involving human participants. If you have more specific questions regard to your IRB process, consult with your instructor. You may also need to submit for IRB, including consent forms to be signed by the participants. In all cases, the papers will be assessed according to criteria normally used by refereed journals.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Student learning outcomes will be demonstrated and assess using the following methods: 1) class activities, 2) leading two discussions on selected topics, 3) online activities, and 4) a seminar paper.

    Class Activities (10%): Completion of all assigned readings and active participation in seminar discussions. Students are required to participate in class discussion actively and attendance will be evaluated: interpretation & reactions to readings, opinions, analysis, synthesis, critiques, and beyond.

    Presence and participation are crucial facets of a seminar. Students should consult with an instructor in advance regarding any absences or problems that they encounter during the semester and should attend every class for the full time period. Absence(s), coming late, or leaving early from class significantly affects everyone’s ability to share their professionalism with their colleagues. Students should make every effort to attend all sessions. Lateness or early departure will be considered an absence. Students missing more than two class sessions may be withdrawn from the course.

    Online Activities (10%): Students participate in online discussion (blog) with illuminating interpretation and reaction to readings, opinions, analysis, synthesis, and critiques.

    Critical reading notes/discussion ideas to be kept on a blog (10 entries minimum in five different weeks), with one blog at least 300 words long

    Leading Two Discussions on selected topics (30%): Rubric will be provided to students.

    Students-led discussion after reading analyzing, evaluating, and critiquing assigned readings. Rubric will be provided (See appendix)

    A Seminar Paper (50%): Students compose a literature-based conceptual paper or conduct an empirical study based on sociocultural theory by selecting appropriate methods and collecting and analyzing data. A research study that utilizes sociocultural theory in some way, either for the development of an intervention or as a research framework to analyze data.

    Students are required to submit the seminar paper in two stages.

    Stage 1: An outline of the topic in prose, questions asked, and a listing of the resources compiled for the project.

    Stage 2: A completed seminar paper.

    Paper topics might include

    • A pedagogical proposal or implemented intervention

    • A theoretical inquiry

    • The theoretical framework or literature review for a masters or PhD thesis

    • A literature review of some aspect of SCT and SLA, literacy, or more general learning and development

    • A research study that utilizes sociocultural theory in some way, either for the development of an intervention or as a research framework to analyze data

    Papers may be done individually or collaboratively in pairs. Topics are open, but the professor will offer several suggestions that may be of interest. You should feel free to discuss your interests with the professor at any time. If you haven’t completed “IRB certification,” please do so as soon as possible. This will be necessary if you plan to undertake any empirical research involving human participants. If you have more specific questions regard to your IRB process, consult with your instructor. You may also need to submit for IRB, including consent forms to be signed by the participants. In all cases, the papers will be assessed according to criteria normally used by refereed journals.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    . Make-up Policy on Missed Work: Any late work will be evaluated and the overall course grade will be lowered by one-half a letter (e.g. from A to A-). Any late work will not be accepted more than one week past the due date. The university policy on academic integrity and plagiarism will be followed.

    Academic Dishonesty:

    “Plagiarism is defined as "literary theft" and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public-at-large, must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one's own, segments or the total of another person's work.”

    “Punishment for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include receipt of an "F" with a numerical value of zero on the item submitted, and the "F" shall be used to determine the final course grade. It is the option of the instructor to assign the student a grade of "F" of "FF" (the latter indicating dishonesty) in the course.”

    Detection of Plagiarism: It is very important to state in your syllabus that you plan to submit student assignments to SafeAssignment.com in order to detect plagiarism. This will give you the legal right to submit student assignments to SafeAssignment.com. If you pan to submit assignments to Safe Assignment, use the statement below:

    The University of South Florida has an account with an automated plagiarism detection service which allows instructors to submit student assignments to be checked for plagiarism. I reserve the right to 1) request that assignments be submitted to me as electronic files and 2) electronically submit to SafeAssignment.com, or 3) ask students to submit their assignments to SafeAssignment.com through myUSF. Assignments are compared automatically with a database of journal articles, web articles, and previously submitted papers. The instructor receives a report showing exactly how a student's paper was plagiarized.

    Web Portal Information:

    Every newly enrolled USF student receives an official USF e-mail account that ends with "mail.acomp.usf.edu." Every official USF correspondence to students will be sent to that account. Go to the Academic Computing website and select the link "Activating a Student E-mail Account" for detailed information. Information about the USF Web Portal can be found at:

    http://www.acomp.usf.edu/portal.htm.

    ADA Statement:

    “Students with disabilities are responsible for registering with the Office of Student Disabilities Services in order to receive special accommodations and services. Please notify the instructor during the first week of classes if a reasonable accommodation for a disability is needed for this course. A letter from the USF Disability Services Office must accompany this request.”

    USF Policy on Religious Observances:

    “Students who anticipate the necessity of being absent from class due to the observation of a major religious observance must provide notice of the date(s) to the instructor, in writing, by the second class meeting.”

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Second Language Acquisition/ Instructional Technology


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    Students in Counselor Education, Adult, Career & Higher Education, Educational Leadership & Policy Studies, Special Education Psychological & Social Foundations, and Early Childhood & Literacy Studies.



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.