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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - PHC6931

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2010-09-02
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: Change
Course Change Information (for course changes only): Add a prerequisite course, PHC 6410 Social and Behavioral Sciences Applied to Health. Based on experience, the faculty have found that many students taking this required course have a limited background in social science and need to take the basic core course in Social and Behavioral Sciences Applied to Health before the Advanced Seminar.
Comments: College approved 5/27/10; GS recd 6/21/10; GC approved 8/18/10. To SCNS 8/25/10. Approved, effective 10/1/2010


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2288 2010-02-04
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Community and Family Health PH 640500
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Jeannine Coreil 9746698 jcoreil@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    PHC 6931 Adv Seminar in Social & Behavioral Sciences Applied to Health

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Adv Sem Soc Beh Sci Appl Hlth
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    CI

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    The course overviews the use of

    social science theory and methods

    in health problem analysis and

    program design.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Doctoral degree in social or behavioral science, community and family health, or related field.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the relationships between psychological, interpersonal, social structural, cultural and biological factors as they impact on the etiology and management of illness.

    2. Students will be able to analyze a particular public health problem from a biopsychosocial perspective and identify specific factors that contribute to its development.

    3. Students will demonstrate an ability to determine the appropriate levels of intervention (e.g. individual, family, school, church, community, health care system, legal system, etc.) for different health problems.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to: Critically evaluate and apply a broad range of social and behavioral science theories to analyze public health problems in terms of the factors which influence problem development alternative approaches to their resolution;

    Understand the similarities and contrasts in the approaches taken by different social and behavioral science disciplines in the study of health-related problems;

    Exhibit an in-depth understanding of the relationships between individual, interpersonal, social, structural, cultural and biological factors as they impact the etiology and management of illness;

    Critically evaluate scholarly research in social and behavioral sciences applied to health in terms of its theoretical soundness, scientific rigor, appropriate use of concepts and methods, and contribution to knowledge;

    Understand ethical principles guiding the conduct of research on human subjects, including principles for ethical decision-making beyond the regulatory purview of institutional review boards;

    Determine the appropriate level of intervention for different health problems, including individual behavior, family systems, community organization, complex social systems and the social and physical environment; and

    C. Major Topics

    Introduction, History and Mission

    Poverty, Material Resources, and Neighborhoods

    Gender and Power

    Theories, Culture and Illness Behavior

    Program Planning, Community Based Approaches, Social Marketing

    Organizational level Theories and Factors

    Interpersonal Level Theories

    Evidence-based Public Health

    Policy and social and Behavioral Change in Public Health

    D. Textbooks

    NA

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Bandura, A. (1998). Health promotion from the perspective of social cognitive theory. Psychology and Health, 13, 623-649.

    Barrera, M., Jr., Toobert, D. J., Angell, K. L., Glasgow, R. E., & Mackinnon, D. P. (2006). Social support and social-ecological resources as mediators of lifestyle intervention effects for type 2 diabetes. Journal of Health Psychology, 11(3), 483-495.

    Brownson, R. C., Baker, E. A., Leet, T. L., & Gillespie, K. N. (2003). The need for evidence-based public health. In Evidence-Based Public Health (pp. 3-23). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Brownson, R. C., Ballew, P., Dieffenderfer, B., Haire-Joshu, D., Heath, G. W., Kreuter, M. W., et al. (2007). Evidence-based interventions to promote physical activity. What contributes to dissemination by state health departments. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 33(1S), 66-78.

    Brownson, R. C., Chriqui, J. F., & Stamatakis, K. A. (2009). Understanding evidence-based public health policy. American Journal of Public Health, 99(9), 1576-1583.

    Cannuscio, C. C., Weiss, E. E., Fruchtman, H., Schroeder, J., Weiner, J., & Asch, D. A. (2009). Visual epidemiology: Photographs as tools for probing street-level etiologies. Social Science & Medicine, 69(4), 553-564.

    Freudenberg, N. (2005). Public health advocacy to change corporate practices: Implications for health education practice and research. Health Education and Behavior, 32(3), 298-319.

    Gamble, V. N. (1997). Under the shadow of Tuskegee: African Americans and health care. American Journal of Public Health, 87(11), 1773-1778.

    Garcia-Moreno, C., Heise, L., Jansen, H., Ellsberg, M., & Watts, C. (2005). Public health: Violence against women. Science, 310(5752), 1282-1283.

    Goodman, A. H. (2000). Why genes don't count (for racial differences in health). American Journal of Public Health, 90(11), 1699-1702.

    Green, L. W., Ottoson, J. M., Garcia, C., & Hiatt, R. A. (2009). Diffusion theory and knowledge dissemination, utilization, and integration in public health. Annual Review of Public Health, 30, 151-174.

    Harman, J. J., & Amico, K. R. (2009). The relationship-oriented information-motivation-behavioral skills model: a multilevel structural equation model among dyads. AIDS and Behavior, 13(2), 173-184.

    Hirsch, J. S., Meneses, S., Thompson, B., Negroni, M., Pelcastre, B., & del Rio, C. (2007). The Inevitability of infidelity: Sexual reputation, social geographies, and marital HIV risk in rural Mexico. American Journal of Public Health, 97(6), 986-996.

    Holmes, D., Murray, S. J., Perron, A., & Rail, G. (2006). Deconstructing the evidence-based discourse in health sciences: truth, power and fascism. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, 4(3), 180-186.

    Marmot, M. (2005). Social determinants of health inequalities. Lancet, 365, 1099-1104.

    McGrath, M. M., Fullilove, R. E., Kaufman, M. R., Wallace, R., & Fullilove, M. T. (2009). The limits of collaboration: a qualitative study of community ethical review of environmental health research. American Journal of Public Health, 99(8), 1510-1514.

    National Cancer Institute. (2005). Theory at a Glance: A Guide for Health Promotion Practice (2nd Edition). Retrieved July 31, 2008, from http://www.nci.nih.gov/PDF/481f5d53-63df-41bc-bfaf-5aa48ee1da4d/TAAG3.pdf.

    Panchanadeswaran, S., Johnson, S. C., Go, V. F., Srikrishnan, A. K., Sivaram, S., Solomon, S., et al. (2008). Using the Theory of Gender and Power to Examine Experiences of Partner Violence, Sexual Negotiation, and Risk of HIV/AIDS Among Economically Disadvantaged Women in Southern India. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, 15(3), 155-178.

    Perez, L. M., & Treadwell, H. M. (2009). Determining what we stand for will guide what we do: community priorities, ethical research paradigms, and research with vulnerable populations. American Journal of Public Health, 99(2), 201-204.

    Pham-Kanter, G. (2009). Social comparisons and health: Can having richer friends and neighbors make you sick? Social Science & Medicine.

    Phelan, J. C., & Link, B. G. (2005). Controlling disease and preventing disparities: A fundamental cause perspective. Journals of Gerontology: Series B, 60 B, 27-33.

    Shannon, K., Strathdee, S. A., Shoveller, J., Rusch, M., Kerr, T., & Tyndall, M. W. (2009). Structural and environmental barriers to condom use negotiation with clients among female sex workers: implications for HIV-prevention strategies and policy. American Journal of Public Health, 99(4), 659-665.

    Slomka, J., Quill, B., desVignes-Kendrick, M., & Lloyd, L. E. (2008). Professionalism and ethics in the public health curriculum. Public Health Reports, 123, 27-35.

    Sorensen, G., Barbeau, E., Stoddard, A. M., Hunt, M. K., Kaphingst, K., & Wallace, L. (2005). Promoting behavior change among working-class, multiethnic workers: results of the healthy directions--small business study. American Journal of Public Health, 95(8), 1389-1395.

    Stephenson, R. (2009). Community influences on young people's sexual behavior in 3 African countries. American Journal of Public Health, 99(1), 102-109.

    Subramanyam, M., Kawachi, I., Berkman, L., & Subramanian, S. V. (2009). Relative deprivation in income and self-rated health in the United States (Vol. 69, pp. 327-334): Elsevier.

    van Ryn, M., & Fu, S. S. (2003). Paved with good intentions: do public health and human service providers contribute to racial/ethnic disparities in health? American Journal of Public Health, 93(2), 248-255.

    Weiner, B. J., Lewis, M. A., & Linnan, L. A. (2009). Using organization theory to understand the determinants of effective implementation of worksite health promotion programs. Health Education Research, 24(2), 292-305.

    Williams, D. R. (2003). The Health of Men: Structured Inequalities and Opportunities. American Journal of Public Health, 93(5), 724-731.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Course Expectations

    This course is designed to provide a stimulating learning environment. The instructor expects the following:

    1. Class will begin and end on time.

    2. Students will come to class prepared to actively participate in discussion and related activities.

    3. Students will be respectful of one another at all times.

    4. Students and the instructor will be respectful of one another at all times.

    5. Students will meet course deadlines on time. Students who fail to meet deadlines will be receive grade penalties; no exceptions.

    6. Electronic sounds are disruptive in the classroom setting. All cell phones, beepers, computers, and any other electronic gadgets must be muted during classes.

    Course Requirements

    1. Study chapters 1-9, and 13-15 from the Coreil textbook (see Required Readings) and take a multiple-choice exam on October 28 covering this material.

    2. Assignment: Each week (beginning with Week 2), prepare and hand in questions related to the assigned readings. Specifically, students are expected to prepare 2 questions for each reading (including chapters and articles) assigned in a given week. Questions should be typed and handed in to the instructor at the end of each class period. If students must miss a class, they should email the questions to Dr. Marhefka before 5:15 pm on the day the questions are due. Questions must demonstrate critical thinking related to the assigned readings. Students should be prepared to use these questions to lead or contribute to discussion. Appropriate questions would include those that:

    • Seek clarity re: the readings

    • Relate to the relevance of the topic/ approach/ idea to public health

    • Identify paradoxes or logical fallacies in the readings

    • Pertain to research design (why did the authors do this instead of that?; wouldn’t it have been better if…) of the readings

    • Could provide the basis for further investigation (e.g., I wonder if the reason for X is Y? How might C contribute to A?) that would build on information in the readings

    Grading: 2 points will be credited for each week’s questions if: 1) they consist of the expected number of questions (i.e., 2 questions for every reading assigned for that week); and 2) all questions demonstrate critical thinking about the readings. 1 point will be credited for each week’s questions if: 1) they consist of at least half of the expected number of questions; and/or 2) at least half of the expected number of questions demonstrate critical thinking about the readings. If criteria are not met for 2 or 1 points, a grade of ‘0’ will be granted. No late questions will be accepted. Late questions will be given a grade of ‘0.’

    3. Present a current news article (as found online or in print) that relates to the social and behavioral sciences in public health. Each student will be assigned a date for which they will be responsible for giving the presentation. The presentation should:

    • Last 10-12 minutes, with an additional 5 minutes for question and answer

    • Briefly describe the news article (2 points)

    • Identify how the article relates to the social and behavioral sciences in public health, broadly, and to a specific topic discussed in the course (2 points)

    • Identify how the article supports or contradicts information or theories encountered in the course (2 points)

    • Discuss what you would write in a “letter to the editor” in response to the article (2 points)

    • Be clear, concise, and easy to follow and understand (2 points)

    4. Prepare a class presentation and paper as described below. The paper will take the place of a final exam.

    A. Identify a public health problem to analyze using the socio-ecological model. While nearly any public health problem would be appropriate, you must choose a topic other than one that is well represented in course content. Moreover, students are encouraged to make their topics as specific as possible (e.g., instead of “HIV/AIDS” you might choose “high rates of unprotected sex among young men living in rural settings.” In this example, the problem is unprotected sex, while the public health significance is that unprotected sex leads to unwanted pregnancies as well as sexually transmitted diseases and HIV.

    B. Seek approval from Dr. Marhefka regarding your identified problem by September 16th at 5:15 pm. Topic should be emailed to the instructor and students will receive a written response. Students who fail to seek approval by September 16th will be penalized 5% of the paper grade. Two students will not be allowed to proceed with an identical topic.

    C. Identify at least 15 references (not assigned course readings) that will help you to analyze the problem from a socio-ecological perspective.

    D. Prepare a detailed outline of the paper, based on the expectations listed in section E (below). Outline is due on October 21st at 5:15 pm. The outline should be typed, printed, and brought to class.

    E. Prepare a 10-15 page paper (double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font, 1 inch margins all around) that: a) provides a rationale for the significance of the problem to public health; b) outlines critical determinants from each level of the socio-ecological model that contribute to the public health problem and provides either empirical evidence or theoretical justification (only if there is no evidence) for these as determinants; and c) proposes interventions that would help to address problems at each level of the model. A rationale must be provided for the appropriateness of each intervention; again, either provide empirical evidence (if intervention has been tested) or theoretical justification. References (see section C) must be cited as appropriate, which means that if more than 15 references are needed to make your points they should be included. Course readings should be used as additional references to support the rationale for the proposed interventions. In addition to the 10-15 pages, a table should be provided that lists the determinants and interventions at each level of the socio-ecological model (it is not necessary to cite references in the table).

    F. Prepare a power point presentation for class (approximately 25 minutes; date to be assigned) based on the paper. Note that the paper is due after the presentation to allow additional changes to your analysis of the problem and potential solutions based on group feedback.

    G. Students will be asked to provide feedback on each presentation, and peer feedback will be incorporated into the presentation grade.

    H. Paper is to be submitted using SafeAssign in Blackboard no later than 5:15 pm on Wednesday, December 2. This means your paper will be checked against the internet and other internal and external document databases to detect signs of plagiarism. Students should correct any problems revealed by the SafeAssign report before submitting the paper. View this link for information about interpreting SafeAssign reports: http://wiki.safeassign.com/display/SAFE/Interpret+Reports Students should resubmit the paper to SafeAssign if they make changes between the initial SafeAssign submission and the final submission of the paper.

    I. Grading: Grading rubrics for the paper and presentation will be made available to students by September 16, 2009.

    TEXT and Required Reading

    Coreil, J. (Ed.). (2010). Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health, 2nd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

    The exam will be based on this textbook. It is not necessary to purchase this book, but you will be responsible for knowing the material when you take the exam in this course and the comprehensive exam for the college. The text may also assist you if you plan to take the National Certification Exam in Public Health. There will be a copy of the book on reserve in the Shimberg Library, with 3-day checkout available. There are one or two books available for longer checkout from the Shimberg Library, as well. The book can be ordered from Amazon (www.amazon.com) or Barnes and Noble (www.bn.com).

    Additional required course readings are available in PDF format on Blackboard.

    Grading System

    Prepared questions and class participation 20 points (2 points/week when readings are assigned)

    Exam I 25 points

    News article presentation 10 points

    Detailed paper outline 5 points

    Paper presentation 20 points

    Paper 20 points

    Total 100 points

    GRADING SCALE

    Point Range Grade Point Range Grade

    100-98

    A+ 76-73

    C

    97-93

    A 72-70

    C-

    92-90

    A- 69-67

    D+

    87-89

    B+ 66-63

    D

    86-83

    B 62-60

    D-

    82-80

    B- 59-0

    F

    79-77

    C+ Plagiarism/cheatingg FF

    STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: Any student with a disability is encouraged to meet with me privately during the first week of class to discuss accommodations. Each student must bring a current Memorandum of Accommodations from the Office of Student Disability Services which is prerequisite for receiving accommodations. Accommodated examinations through the Office of Student Disability Services require two weeks notice. All course documents are available in alternate format if requested in the student’s Memorandum of Accommodations.

    CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICY

    Students are encouraged to attend all classes. Students who anticipate the necessity of being absent from class due to the observation of a major religious observance must provide notice of the date(s) to one of the instructors, in writing, by the second class meeting. Students who must miss class should still hand in their questions related to the readings.

    Course Continuation during an Emergency: In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    Disability accommodation: For information regarding special accommodations see: http://www.asasd.usf.edu/faculty.htm

    Dates of Religious Observation: For information regarding religious observances see: http://www.sa.usf.edu/handbook/USF_Student_Handbook.pdf

    Plagiarism

    The following information is taken directly from the Graduate Catalog: http://www.grad.usf.edu/inc/linked-files/USF_Grad_Catalog_2009_2010.pdf

    Plagiarism is intentionally or carelessly presenting the work of another as one’s own. It includes submitting an assignment purporting to be the student’s original work which has wholly or in part been created by another person. It also includes the presentation of the work, ideas,

    representations, or words of another person without customary and proper acknowledgement of sources. Students must consult with their instructors for clarification in any situation in which the need for documentation is an issue, and will have plagiarized in any situation in which their work is not properly documented.

    Clarification:

    1. Every direct quotation must be identified by quotation marks or appropriate indentation and must be properly acknowledged by parenthetical citation in the text or in a footnote or endnote.

    2. When material from another source is paraphrased or summarized in whole or in part in one’s own words, that source must be acknowledged in a footnote or endnote, or by parenthetical citation in the text.

    3. Information gained in reading or research that is not common professional knowledge must be

    acknowledged in a parenthetical citation in the text or in a footnote or endnote.

    4. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, the use of papers, reports, projects, and other such materials prepared by someone else.

    Violations and Sanctions for Graduate Students

    The Graduate School holds academic integrity in the highest regard. Graduate students are responsible for being aware of and complying with University Regulations and Policies and must conduct themselves accordingly.

    Sanctions for Academic Dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may range from the receipt of:

    • An “F” or “Zero” grade on the subject paper, lab report, etc.

    • An “F” in the course or activity in which credit may be earned,

    • An “FF” in the course (leading to expulsion from the University)

    • Academic Dismissal for any violations of academic dishonesty policies or regulations

    • Possible revocation of the degree or Graduate Certificate following a thorough investigation

    These policies apply to Graduate Students (students admitted to a graduate degree program or graduate certificate, and/or non‐degree seeking students taking graduate coursework).

    Students are strongly advised to click on this link and view the tutorial on plagiarism: http://www.cte.usf.edu/plagiarism/plag.html

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Week Date Topic Readings Due

    1 8/26/2009 Welcome, Introduction, History and Mission Chapters 1 & 2

    (Slomka, Quill, desVignes-Kendrick, & Lloyd, 2008)

    2 9/2/2009 Social Determinants: Race and Ethnicity Chapters 3 & 9; (Gamble, 1997; Goodman, 2000; van Ryn & Fu, 2003)

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    News Presentation: Anna

    3 9/9/2009 Social Determinants: Poverty, Material Resources, and Neighborhoods (Cannuscio et al., 2009; Marmot, 2005; Pham-Kanter, 2009; Phelan & Link, 2005; Subramanyam, Kawachi, Berkman, & Subramanian, 2009)

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    News Presentation: Bernice

    4 9/16/2009 Social Determinants: Gender and Power Chapter 6

    (Garcia-Moreno, Heise, Jansen, Ellsberg, & Watts, 2005; Panchanadeswaran et al., 2008; Williams, 2003)

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    News Presentation: Amy

    *Topics emailed to Dr. Marhefka for approval

    Dr. Marhefka will provide grading rubrics for final paper and presentation.

    5 9/23/2009 Community Theories, Culture, and Illness Behavior Chapters 5, 7 & 8; (Hirsch et al., 2007; Stephenson, 2009)

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    News Presentation: Linda

    6 9/30/2009 Program Planning, Community Based Approaches, Social Marketing, Chapters 13, 14 & 15; (Perez & Treadwell, 2009)

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    News Presentation: Anita

    7 10/7/2009 Organizational Level Theories and Factors (Brownson et al., 2007; McGrath, Fullilove, Kaufman, Wallace, & Fullilove, 2009; Sorensen et al., 2005; Weiner, Lewis, & Linnan, 2009)

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    News Presentations: Ashley & Lark

    8 10/14/2009 Interpersonal Level Theories (Bandura, 1998; Barrera, Toobert, Angell, Glasgow, & Mackinnon, 2006; Harman & Amico, 2009)

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    News Presentation: Akilah

    Week Date Topic Readings Due

    9 10/21/2009 Intrapersonal Level Theories Chapter 4

    (National Cancer Institute, 2005)

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    Draft Outline

    10 10/28/2009 Evidence-Based Public Health (Brownson, Baker, Leet, & Gillespie, 2003; Green, Ottoson, Garcia, & Hiatt, 2009; Holmes, Murray, Perron, & Rail, 2006)

    *In-Class Exam

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    11 11/4/2009 Policy and social and behavioral change in public health AND

    Paper presentations (3 today) (Brownson, Chriqui, & Stamatakis, 2009; Freudenberg, 2005; Shannon et al., 2009)

    2 questions for every reading (including chapters)

    11/11/2009 NO CLASS: VETERAN’S DAY

    12 11/18/2009 Paper presentations (5 today)

    13 11/25/2009 No class. Work on papers.

    12/2/2009 Final paper, due by 5: 15 pm. Submit via Safe Assign.

    H. Attendance Policy

    CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICY

    Students are encouraged to attend all classes. Students who anticipate the necessity of being absent from class due to the observation of a major religious observance must provide notice of the date(s) to one of the instructors, in writing, by the second class meeting. Students who must miss class should still hand in their questions related to the readings.

    Course Continuation during an Emergency: In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    Disability accommodation: For information regarding special accommodations see: http://www.asasd.usf.edu/faculty.htm

    Dates of Religious Observation: For information regarding religious observances see: http://www.sa.usf.edu/handbook/USF_Student_Handbook.pdf

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Plagiarism

    The following information is taken directly from the Graduate Catalog: http://www.grad.usf.edu/inc/linked-files/USF_Grad_Catalog_2009_2010.pdf

    Plagiarism is intentionally or carelessly presenting the work of another as one’s own. It includes submitting an assignment purporting to be the student’s original work which has wholly or in part been created by another person. It also includes the presentation of the work, ideas,

    representations, or words of another person without customary and proper acknowledgement of sources. Students must consult with their instructors for clarification in any situation in which the need for documentation is an issue, and will have plagiarized in any situation in which their work is not properly documented.

    Clarification:

    1. Every direct quotation must be identified by quotation marks or appropriate indentation and must be properly acknowledged by parenthetical citation in the text or in a footnote or endnote.

    2. When material from another source is paraphrased or summarized in whole or in part in one’s own words, that source must be acknowledged in a footnote or endnote, or by parenthetical citation in the text.

    3. Information gained in reading or research that is not common professional knowledge must be

    acknowledged in a parenthetical citation in the text or in a footnote or endnote.

    4. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, the use of papers, reports, projects, and other such materials prepared by someone else.

    Violations and Sanctions for Graduate Students

    The Graduate School holds academic integrity in the highest regard. Graduate students are responsible for being aware of and complying with University Regulations and Policies and must conduct themselves accordingly.

    Sanctions for Academic Dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may range from the receipt of:

    • An “F” or “Zero” grade on the subject paper, lab report, etc.

    • An “F” in the course or activity in which credit may be earned,

    • An “FF” in the course (leading to expulsion from the University)

    • Academic Dismissal for any violations of academic dishonesty policies or regulations

    • Possible revocation of the degree or Graduate Certificate following a thorough investigation

    These policies apply to Graduate Students (students admitted to a graduate degree program or graduate certificate, and/or non‐degree seeking students taking graduate coursework).

    Students are strongly advised to click on this link and view the tutorial on plagiarism: http://www.cte.usf.edu/plagiarism/plag.html

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MPH Concentration in Socio-Health Sciences


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    Elective in graduate programs of anthropology, sociology, psychology and gerontology.



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.