Apply to USF Now | Graduate Admissions | Events & Workshops | Giving to the Office of Graduate Studies

Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - MAN6456

Edit function not enabled for this course.


Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2010-05-10
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: New
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments: Grad Council approved 2/15/10; SCNS Liaison notified 4/6/10; Approved, effective 8/1/2010; posted in banner - NUMBER ASSIGNED 6456


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2241 2009-11-13
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Management BA 140500
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Cynthia Cohen 9741776 ccohen@usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    MAN 6456 Improvisation in Business Organizations

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 O - Other R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Improvisation in Organizations
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    none

    Corequisites

    none

    Course Description

    This course facilitates learning and skill building based on organization studies research on business improvisation. Students will participate in a variety of experiential exercises and cases from organizational behavior and theatrical improvisation.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Replacing Selected Topics with Permanent number; already listed in program

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This is an elective and counts toward the management track in the Masters of Business Administration program. This course has been very successful and is in high demand among graduate students in the College of Business as well as students from other colleges. This course has been used as an elective by students in the Master of Science in Management, Master of Accountancy, Master of Information Systems, Master of Finance, and Ph.D. in Communication programs. It could also be used by students in the Ph.D. in I/O Psychology program and other doctoral programs. It has been offered three times and was at capacity for each offering. Student feedback has been very positive. It incorporates a multi-disciplinary approach to developing organization skills and provides a new perspective for improving individual and organizational performance.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 3 or more times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    A Ph.D. in Management or closely related field and ability to use experiential exercises and feedback as primary learning tools.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The purpose of this course is to develop skills for managers and organization members using improvisation metaphors discussed in organization studies literature and experiential exercises from organizational behavior and theatrical improvisation. Students will learn and apply the underlying concepts of improvisation including good communication, creative thinking, rapid response, concentration, focus, and teamwork.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    After completing this course, students will

    • Understand the basic principles of improvisation, improvisation as a paradigm for organizational analysis, and the role of improvisation in organizations

    • Develop the ability to listen effectively to others and “be in the moment”

    • Learn the use of improvisation skills to solve problems and resolve organizational conflicts more effectively

    • Appreciate the importance of making others look good

    • Understand the use and significance of non-verbal communication

    • Engage in more constructive give and take responses with others

    • Understand how status affects improvisation and organizations

    • Learn how improvisation skills can improve teambuilding and inspire trust

    • Learn how individual and team creativity and innovation can be increased with improvisation

    • Develop comfort with spontaneity, risk taking and public speaking

    • Develop a rapid response mentality for unexpected, complex or high stress situations in organizations

    C. Major Topics

    •Basic concepts of improvisation

    •Improvisation as a paradigm for organizational analysis

    •Non-verbal communication skills and improvisation

    •The role of status in organizations and improvisation

    •Trust, communication and teamwork for complicated tasks

    •Creativity, innovation, and improvisation

    •The role of improvisation in negotiation and problem solving in organizations

    •Development of spontaneity and rapid response with improvisation

    D. Textbooks

    None.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Balachandra, Lakshmi, Bordone, Robert C., and Menkel-Meadow, Carrie, “Improvisation and Negotiation: Expecting the Unexpected”, Negotiation Journal, October 2005, Vol. 21, No. 4, 415-423.

    Castelanetta, Dan and Schwartz, Gary. “Tools to Help Scene Work”, The Spolin Center.

    Joby, John, Grove, Stephen A., Fisk, Raymond. “Improvisation in service

    performances: lessons from jazz”, Managing Service Quality, 2006, Vol. 16, No. 2, 247-268.

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. “Strategy as Improvisational Theater”, Sloan Management Review, Winter 2007, Vol. 43, No. 2, 76-81.

    Vera, Dusya and Crossan, Mary. “Theatrical Improvisation: Lessons for

    Organizations”, Organization Studies, 2004, 25, 727-749.

    Weick, Karl, “Improvisation as a Mindset for Organizational Analysis” Organization Science, Vol. 9, No. 5, Special Issue: Jazz Improvisation and Organizing (Sep. - Oct., 1998), pp. 543-555.

    Zack, Michael, “Jazz Improvisation and Organizing: Once More from the Top, Organization Science, March/April 2000, Vol. 11, No. 2, 227-234.

    Johnstone, Keith. Impro: Improvisation and the Theatre, “Status”, pp. 36-47, Routledge/Theater Arts Books.

    Spolin, Viola. Improvisation for the Theater, “Reminders and Pointers”, pp. 34-47 Northwestern University Press.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Student learning outcomes will be measured in two ways. The first is an evaluation of class participation. Not only must students attend class, they must engage in a variety of experiential exercises and case analyses during each class. Participation is measured by willingness to engage fully in the process, not by any particular outcomes of the various exercises. Each session will include an activity that will help students better understand the basic elements of improvisation and how they relate to business organizations. Some of these will relate to the assigned readings for the day and others will extend thinking in other ways. Sometimes students will be asked to submit a short written response to a question about the readings. Other times we will discuss a case. In the late afternoon, we will have a review of the activities of the day. Although we will discuss the outcomes of the exercises as we experience them, at the end of each session we will have more time to discuss them and to put them into greater perspective of how they relate to organizations.

    The second measurement of student learning outcomes is a project called the “personal account”. Each student demonstrates his or her understanding of improvisation in business organizations by developing a unique project that represents their expression of what they have learned in the class. Personal accounts can take many forms including written, audio, or visual. If students work together, each students’ contribution must be made clear.

    In summary, student level of accomplishment will be determined by willingness to engage fully in the learning process during each class session, understanding of improvisation concepts based on contributions to class discussion, the ability to discuss how improvisation skills fit into organization life, and completion of the individual personal account

    Class participation: 60%

    Personal account: 40%

    The plus and minus system will not be used.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Course outline for the one-week MBA program format.

    •CLASS SCHEDULE. TOPICS AND ASSIGNMENTS

    •Monday, March 8

    •Morning Session

    •Understanding the basics of improvisation in organizations

    •Vera, Dusya and Crossan, Mary. “Theatrical Improvisation: Lessons for Organizations”, Organization Studies, 2004, 25, 727-749.

    •Castellaneta, Dan and Schwartz, Gary. “Tools to Help Scene Work”, The Spolin Center.

    •Spolin, Viola. Improvisation for the Theater, “Reminders and Pointers”, pp. 34-47 Northwestern University Press in your Pro-Copy Packet).

    •Skill building:

    •Eye contact, listening, being in the moment, yes and

    •Afternoon Session

    •Skill building: making your partner look good

    •acceptance, agreement, adding on

    •Tuesday, March 9

    •Morning Session

    •Understanding the jazz metaphor for organizational improvisation

    •Weick, Karl, “Improvisation as a Mindset for Organizational Analysis” Organization Science, Vol. 9, No. 5, Special Issue: Jazz Improvisation and Organizing (Sep. -Oct., 1998), pp. 543-555.

    •Zack, Michael, “Jazz Improvisation and Organizing: Once More From the Top, Organization Science, March/April 2000, Vol. 11, No. 2, 227-234.

    •Skill building: putting basic skills to work

    •non-verbal communication skills

    •Afternoon Session

    •Status in organizations and its effect on improvisation

    •Johnstone, Keith. Impro: Improvisation and the Theatre, “Status”, pp. 36-47, Routledge/Theater Arts Books in your PRO-COPY packet.

    •Skill building: adding new layers

    •Working with different levels of status

    •Wednesday, March 10

    •Morning Session

    •Understanding organization strategy in a new way

    •Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. “Strategy as Improvisational Theater”,Sloan Management Review, Winter 2007, Vol. 43, No. 2, 76-81.

    •Skill building: developing good teamwork

    •trust, communication and complicated tasks

    •Afternoon Session

    •Skill building: retraining our brains

    •creativity and innovation

    •Thursday, March 11

    •Morning Session

    •Understanding the role of improvisation in negotiation and conflict resolution

    •Balachandra, Lakshmi, Bordone, Robert C., and Menkel-Meadow, Carrie, “Improvisation and Negotiation: Expecting the Unexpected”, Negotiation Journal, October 2005, Vol. 21, No. 4, 415-423.

    •Skill building: listening, adapting, creating new options

    •Managing conflict, problem solving, and negotiating using improvisational concepts

    •Afternoon Session

    •Skill building: more advanced improvisation

    •spontaneity and rapid response

    •Friday, March 12

    •Morning Session

    •Putting improvisation to work in organizations

    •Joby, John, Grove, Stephen A., Fisk, Raymond. “Improvisation in service performances: lessons from jazz”, Managing Service Quality, 2006, Vol. 16, No. 2, 247-268.

    •Skill building: putting it all together: finding the game

    •Afternoon Session

    •On your own

    •Take some time to think about your personal account which is due April 18.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Attendance is required at every class session, except for observance of religious holidays as required by University Policy. Students who anticipate being absent from class due to a major religious observance must provide notice of the date to the instructor in writing by the second class meeting. Students will be provided with an assignment that will count as “class participation” for the missed class.

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Except for those items set forth in the Attendance policy, students will not be allowed to make-up class work. For those students meeting the attendance policy exceptions, all make-up work must comply with the USF Policy on Academic Integrity.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Master of Business Administration


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    This course has been used as an elective by students in the Master of Science in Management, Master of Accountancy, Master of Information Systems, Master of Finance, and Ph.D. in Communication programs. It could also be used by students in the Ph.D. in I/O Psychology program and other doctoral programs.



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.