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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - EEX6619

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2010-05-10
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: Change
Course Change Information (for course changes only): Change course title from Positive Behavior Support to: Positive Behavior Support Low Incid. Intellectual Disab. & ASD Change Abb. Title from Positive Behavior Support to: PosBehaviorSuppIntellDisb&ASD Change course description to: Knowledge and skills necessary to develop,implement,and evaluate the impact of positive behavior support for students with s/pintellect.disab. And/or autism spectrum disorder.Communicative function of challenging behaviors,teaching new skills & prevention
Comments: Grad Council approved 2/15/10; SCNS liaison notified 4/6/10; Approved, effective 8/1/2010; posted in banner


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2232 2009-11-05
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Special Education ED 172800
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Phyllis Jones 8139746588 pjones7@coedu.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    EEX 6619 Positive Behavior Support

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    O - Other R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Positive Behavior Support
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    O - Online (100% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    Knowledge and skills necessary to develop,implement,and evaluate the impact of positive behavior support. Understanding the communicative function of challenging behaviors,teaching of new skills & prevention of the reoccurence of challenging behaviors.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed to meet state requirements, licensure, etc

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    To support teachers who complete teh application for the FL Department of Education Endorsement. Florida DOE states the need for specific terminology in order to meet requirements. The content and nature of the courses remain the same. By modifying the title we serve our students better.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, 1 time

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Doctorate


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1.1 Behavioral theory / applied behavior analysis / social learning theory

    1.2 History of behavior intervention and positive behavior support

    1.3 Examining PBS Framework

    1.4 Evidence-base of Positive Behavior Support

    2.1 Procedural safe guards mandated by Section 504 and IDEA

    2.2 Ethical principles to consider when selecting behavioral interventions

    2.3 Professional ethics involved in behavior management

    3.1 Autism symptoms and behavior challenges

    3.2 Four term contingency and challenging behavior

    3.3 Functional nature of challenging behavior

    4.1 Strategies for conducting a functional behavioral assessment

    4.2 Observing behavior (anecdotal, ABC approaches, counting frequency, duration, occurrence, latency, etc.)

    4.3 Recording and reporting observations (using technology to graph and display data)

    4.4 Analyzing observational data

    4.5 Collecting and analyzing informal and formal social, communication, and academic data to inform the functional assessment process

    4.6 Interview strategies

    4.7 Developing hypotheses for the function of challenging behavior

    4.8 Development of individualized behavior support plans

    5.1 Implementation of positive behavioral supports

    5.2 Instruction of alternative social, communication, and behavior skills for students with autism

    5.3 Strategies for supporting peer social interaction and the development of pro-social skills

    6.1 Communicating with parents and professionals about behavior challenges

    6.2 Collaborative development of behavior support plans

    6.3 Supporting families in addressing home and community concerns

    7.1 Environmental classroom supports and visual strategies

    7.2 Classroom structure including adult roles, physical arrangement, and instructional materials

    7.3 Classroom management strategies for support of individual and group appropriate behavior

    Field Experiences

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1.0 Articulate the tenets of the theories and research that underpin and support the use of positive behavior support and applied behavior management

    2.0 Describe ethical and legal principles that guide behavior interventions

    3.0 Understanding the environmental determinants of problem behaviors

    4.0 Describe and demonstrate strategies for measuring behavior change, conducting a functional behavioral assessment, and developing behavior support strategies

    5.0 Describe and demonstrate strategies for teaching and encouraging the development of social, communicative, and alternative skills

    6.0 Collaborate with others, including family members, to implement behavioral interventions that support students displaying disruptive behaviors in school and community settings.

    7.0 Describe environmental, instructional, and behavioral management practices that support the engagement and learning of the student with autism within classrooms.

    C. Major Topics

    Behavioral Interventions and Positive Behavior Support: History, Science, and Values; Understanding the Problem Behavior of Students with Autism and other significant disabilities; Initiating the Behavior Support Process: Collaborative Teaming and Functional Assessment; Functional Assessment: A portfolio process to generate hypotheses about the purpose of problem behavior; Antecedent Interventions and Responding to Problem Behavior; Instruction of Alternative Skills; Plan, Development, Implementation, and Outcome Measurement; Long Term Supports and the Behavioral Development of Students with Autism and other significant disabilities; Collaboration with Families; Creating a Classroom Environment to Support Appropriate Behavior and Social Development

    D. Textbooks

    Bambara, L., & Kern, L. (2005) Individualized supports for students with problem behaviors. New York, NY: Guilford Publications.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Brown, K. E., & Mirenda, P. (2006). Contingency mapping: Use of a novel visual support strategy as an adjunct to functional equivalence training. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 8, 155-164.

    Carr, E. G., Dunlap, G., Horner, R. H., Koegel, R. L., Turnbull, A. P., Sailor, W., et al. (2002). Positive behavior support: Evolution of an applied science. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 4, 4-16, 20.

    Delano, M. & Snell, M. E. (2006). the effects of social stories on the social engagement of children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 8, 29-42.

    Dunlap, G., & Fox, L. (1999). A demonstration of behavioral support for young children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 1, 77-87.

    Durand, V. M. & Merges, E. (2001). Functional communication training: A contemporary behavior analytic intervention for problem behaviors. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 16, 110-119.

    Heflin, L. J., & Alberto, P. A. (2001). Establishing a behavioral context for learning for students with autism. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 16, 93-101.

    Horner, R.H., & Carr, E.G. (1997). Behavioral support for students with severe disabilities: Functional assessment and comprehensive intervention. Journal of Special Education, 31, 84-104.

    Horner, R. H., Carr, E. G., Strain, P. S., Todd, A. W., & Reed, H. K. (2002). Problem behavior interventions for young children with autism: A research synthesis. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 32, 423-446.

    Jensen, C. J., McConnachie, G., & Pierson, T. (2001). Long term multi-component intervention to reduce severe problem behavior: A 63-month evaluation. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 3, 225-236

    Johnston, S. S., & O’Neill, R. E. (2001). Searching for effectiveness and efficiency in conducting functional assessments: A review and proposed process for teachers and other practitioners. Focus on Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 16, 205-214.

    Moes, D. R., & Frea, W. D. (2000). Using family context to inform treatment planning for the treatment of a child with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 2, 40-46.

    Morrison, L., Kamps, D., Garcia, J., & Parker, D. (2001). Peer mediation and monitoring strategies to improve initiations and social skills for students with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 3, 237-250.

    Snell, M. E. (2002). Strengthening the focus on problem contexts. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 4, 21-24.

    Recommended Resources/Supplemental Readings:

    Bambara, L. M., & Knoster, T. (1998). Designing Positive Behavior Support Plans. Innovations # 13. Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Retardation.

    Bambara, L., Dunlap, G., & Schwartz, I. (Eds.)(2004). Positive Behavior Support: Critical articles on improving practice for individuals with severe disabilities. Pro-Ed and TASH.

    Demchak, M. & Bossert, K.W. (1996). Assessing problem behaviors. Innovations #4. Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Retardation

    Horner, R.H., Dunlap, G., Koegel, R.L., Carr, E.G., Sailor, W., Anderson, J.A., Albin, R.W., & O’Neill, R.E. (1990). Toward a technology of nonaversive behavioral support. Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 15, 125-132.

    Horner, R. H., Carr, E. G., Strain, P. S., Todd, A. W., & Reed, H. K. (2002). Problem behavior interventions for young children with autism: A research synthesis. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 32, 423-446.

    Janzen, J. E. (2003). Understanding the nature of autism: A guide to the autism spectrum disorders. San Antonio, Texas: PyschCorp.

    Koegel, L. K., Steibel, D., & Koegel, R. L. (1998). Reducing aggression in children with autism toward infant or toddler siblings. Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 23, 111-118.

    National Research Council (2001). Educating children with autism. Committee on Educational Interventions for Children with Autism. Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    It is important to realize that an on-line course requires the same amount of time as a course taken on campus. It is typically advised that a course should have 45 hours of work for each credit hour. This means that this coursework should take 13.5 hours of your time each week. Of course, the actual amount of time will vary depending on your learning style, previous knowledge, the complexity of the topic, and the site used for field work.

    1. Each class session will include an application activity that must be completed by the student and submitted to the instructor for grading. Application activities will constitute 25% of the course grade and are worth 50 points (5 points for each).

    2. A synthesis test of application questions will comprise the final exam and assess the student’s ability to apply the content of the course to case studies and classroom scenarios. The test will constitute 25% of the course grade (50 points).

    3. Field Experience Portfolio. Students will complete a field experience portfolio that documents 15 hours of field practicum experience and the ability to apply the following professional practices: conduct a functional assessment interview; collect observational data; develop a behavior hypothesis; design a behavior support plan; and design an instructional plan for alternative skills. The portfolio must include the following:

    a. Activity log

    b. Focus individual description

    c. A walk in his/her shoes essay

    d. Completed functional assessment interview with caregiver or educator

    e. Observation cards or data collection forms that represent observations on 3 separate occasions

    f. Proposed behavior support plan that includes: behavior hypothesis, antecedent interventions; alternative skills; and responses to problem behavior

    g. Proposed instructional plan for teaching alternative skill(s)

    The portfolio will constitute 50% (100 points) of the student’s grade.

    9. Grading System:

    Grades will be determined based on the following scale:

    A = 90% - 100% (180 – 200 points)

    B = 80% - 89% (160 – 179 points)

    C = 70% - 79% (140 – 159 points)

    D = 65% - 69% (130 – 139 points)

    F = below 65% (129 or less points)

    Assignment of plus or minus grades may be implemented per university guidelines.

    Incompletes will not be awarded for this class. Students must complete all activities on schedule to receive credit for activities. Students must complete each session as scheduled.

    No grade below “C” will be accepted toward a graduate degree. This includes C- grades.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Session 1

    Behavioral Interventions and Positive Behavior Support: History, Science, and Values • Bambara & Kern, chapter 1

    • Carr, E. G., Dunlap, G., Horner, R. H., Koegel, R. L., Turnbull, A. P., Sailor, W., et al. (2002). Positive behavior support: Evolution of an applied science. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 4, 4-16, 20.

    • Snell, M. E. (2002). Strengthening the focus on problem contexts. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 4, 21-24.

    Session 2

    Understanding the Problem Behavior of Students with Autism and other significant disabilities • Bambara & Kern, Chapter 2 -3

    • Durand, V. M. & Merges, E. (2001). Functional communication training: A contemporary behavior analytic intervention for problem behaviors. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 16, 110-119.

    Session 3

    Initiating the Behavior Support Process: Collaborative Teaming and Functional Assessment • Bambara & Kern, Chapters 4 – 5

    • Johnston, S. S., & O’Neill, R. E. (2001). Searching for effectiveness and efficiency in conducting functional assessments: A review and proposed process for teachers and other practitioners. Focus on Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 16, 205-214.

    Session 4

    Functional Assessment: A portfolio process to generate hypotheses about the purpose of problem behavior • Bambara & Kern, Chapters 6-7

    Session 5

    Antecedent Interventions and Responding to Problem Behavior • Bambara & Kern, Chapter 8 & 10

    • Brown, K. E., & Mirenda, P. (2006). Contingency mapping: Use of a novel visual support strategy as an adjunct to functional equivalence training. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 8, 155-164.

    Session 6

    Instruction of Alternative Skills • Bambara & Kern, Chapter 9

    • Delano, M. & Snell, M. E. (2006). The effects of social stories on the social engagement of children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 8, 29-42.

    Session 7

    Plan, Development, Implementation, and Outcome Measurement • Dunlap, G., & Fox, L. (1999). A demonstration of behavioral support for young children with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 1, 77-87.

    • Horner, R.H., & Carr, E.G. (1997). Behavioral support for students with severe disabilities: Functional assessment and comprehensive intervention. Journal of Special Education, 31, 84-104.

    Session 8

    Long Term Supports and the Behavioral Development of Students with Autism and other significant disabilities • Bambara & Kern, chapter 11

    • Jensen, C. J., McConnachie, G., & Pierson, T. (2001). Long term multi-component intervention to reduce severe problem behavior: A 63-month evaluation. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 3, 225-236.

    Session 9

    Collaboration with Families • Bambara & Kern, chapter 12

    • Moes, D. R., & Frea, W. D. (2000). Using family context to inform treatment planning for the treatment of a child with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 2, 40-46.

    Session 10

    Creating a Classroom Environment to Support Appropriate Behavior and Social Development • Heflin, L. J., & Alberto, P. A. (2001). Establishing a behavioral context for learning for students with autism. Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 16, 93-101.

    • Morrison, L., Kamps, D., Garcia, J., & Parker, D. (2001). Peer mediation and monitoring strategies to improve initiations and social skills for students with autism. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 3, 237-250.

    • Synthesis Test

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting – Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation – Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. It’s the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Please let your instructor know in advance if you are going to be delayed for any reason. Incompletes will not be awarded for this class. Students must complete all activities on schedule to receive credit for activities. Students must complete each session as scheduled.

    Academic dishonesty (i.e., cheating) is defined as any behavior that results in the misrepresentation of your skills, knowledge, or work as they relate to the course. This includes using other student's ideas and/or help when completing an individual assignment, as well as plagiarism.

    Plagiarism is defined as “literary theft” and consists of the unattributed quotation of the exact words of a published text, or the unattributed borrowing of original ideas by paraphrase from a published text. On written papers for which the student employs information gathered from books, articles, web sites, or oral sources, each direct quotation, as well as ideas and facts that are not generally known to the public at large, or the form, structure or style of a secondary source must be attributed to its author by means of the appropriate citation procedure. Only widely known facts and first-hand thoughts and observations original to the student do not require citations. Citations may be made in footnotes or within the body of the text. Plagiarism also consists of passing off as one’s own segments or the total of another person’s work.

    Punishments for academic dishonesty will depend on the seriousness of the offense and may include assignment of an “F” or a numerical value of zero on the subject paper, lab report, etc., an “F” or an “FF” grade (the latter indicating academic dishonesty) in the course, suspension, or expulsion from the University. A student who receives an “FF” grade may not use the university’s Grade Forgiveness Policy if the course is subsequently repeated. An “FF” grade assigned to indicate academic dishonesty is reflected only on internal records and prevents the student from repeating the course using the Grade Forgiveness Policy. If a student who has been accused of academic dishonesty drops the course, the student’s registration in the course will be reinstated until the issue is resolved. Notice that a student has been dismissed for reasons of academic dishonesty may be reflected on the student’s transcript with the formal notation: Dismissed for Academic Dishonesty.

    Detection of Plagiarism: The University of South Florida has an account with an automated plagiarism detection service, which allows instructors to submit student assignments to be checked for plagiarism. As the instructor of this course, I reserve the right to (1) request that assignments be submitted to me as electronic files and (2) electronically submit assignments to SafeAssignment.com, or (3) ask students to submit their assignments to SafeAssignment.com through myUSF. Assignments are compared automatically with a database of journal articles, web articles, and previously submitted papers. Through this service, the instructor receives a report showing exactly how a student's paper was plagiarized. For more information about SafeAssignment and plagiarism, go to http://www.c21te.usf.edu and click on Plagiarism Resources. For information about plagiarism in the USF undergraduate catalogue, go to: http://www.ugs.usf.edu/catalogs/0304/adadap.htm#plagiarism.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MA ESE


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) graduate certificate



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.