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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - NGR6460

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2010-04-06
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: Change
Course Change Information (for course changes only): Course objectives have been revised in accordance with CCNE accreditation standards. Title correction: Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia I; abbrev: Pharm for Nur Anes I (The previously approved course did not have "I" after the title.) New Objectives: During this course the students will have the opportunity to: Understand general pharmacologic principles including pharmacokinectics, pharmacodynamics and various pharmacotherapeutics of anesthetic agents and adjunctive agents. Interpret the general principles of uptake and distribution of inhalation anesthetic agents. Compare the pharmacological and clinical use of the modern inhalation anesthetics. Evaluate the pharmacological and clinical usage of various narcotic agents used in anesthesia including narcotic antagonists, tolerance, and addiction. Distinguish the pharmacological and clinical use of non-narcotic agents used in anesthesia, including the barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and non-barbiturate induction drugs. Examine the indication for the use of various induction agents, local anesthetics, anticholinesterase and anticholinergic drugs, muscle relaxants, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Discuss the effect of psychopharmacological therapy, chemotherapy, nutritional therapy and antiepileptic drugs upon anesthesia care. Discuss the effect and appropriate choice of antibiotics and antiviral agents utilized in surgical care. Examine the effects of multiple drug regimes on patientís health and the impact on the anesthetic plan of care.
Comments: to GC for review 11/2/09; Approved by GC 11/16/09; to SCNS office for submission 11/29/09. Note Course Description and Objectives listed reflect the revised information. SCNS approved 12/11/09, effective 1/2010; posted in banner 12/11/09


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2215 2009-10-20
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Nursing NR HSC 006201-10000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Denise Maguire 813/974996 dmaguire@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    NGR 6460 Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthesia I

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Pharm for Nur Anes I
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    Focuses on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and general pharmacological principles of anesthetic drugs and adjunctive agents.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    A terminal degree in the field


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    OBJECTIVES: DURING THIS COURSE THE STUDENTS WILL HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO: 1. INTERPRET THE GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF UPTAKE AND DISTRIBUTION OF INHALATION ANESTHETIC AGENTS. 2. COMPARE THE PHARMACOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL USE OF THE MODERN INHALATION ANESTHETICS. 3. EVALUATE THE PHARMACOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL USAGE OF VARIOUS NARCOTIC AGENTS USED IN ANESTHESIA INCLUDING NARCOTIC ANTAGONISTS, TOLERANCE, AND ADDICTION. 4. DISTINGUISH THE PHARMACOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL USE OF NON-NARCOTIC AGENTS USED IN ANESTHESIA, INCLUDING THE BARBITURATES, BENZODIAZEPINES, AND NON-BARBITURATE INDUCTION DRUGS. 5. EXAMINE THE INDICATION FOR THE USE OF VARIOUS INDUCTION AGENTS, LOCAL ANESTHETICS, ANTICHOLINESTERASE AND ANTICHOLINERGIC DRUGS, MUSCLE RELAXANTS, AND NON-STEROIDAL ANTI-INFLAMMATORY DRUGS. 6. DISCUSS THE EFFECT OF PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGICAL THERAPY, CHEMOTHERAPY, NUTRITIONAL THERAPY AND ANTIEPILEPTIC DRUGS UPON ANESTHESIA CARE. 7. DISCUSS THE EFFECT AND APPROPRIATE CHOICE OF ANTIBIOTICS AND ANTIVIRAL AGENTS UTILIZED IN SURGICAL CARE.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    During this course the students will have the opportunity to:

    1. Understand general pharmacologic principles including pharmacokinectics, pharmacodynamics and various pharmacotherapeutics of anesthetic agents and adjunctive agents.

    2. Interpret the general principles of uptake and distribution of inhalation anesthetic agents.

    3. Compare the pharmacological and clinical use of the modern inhalation anesthetics.

    4. Evaluate the pharmacological and clinical usage of various narcotic agents used in anesthesia including narcotic antagonists, tolerance, and addiction.

    5. Distinguish the pharmacological and clinical use of non-narcotic agents used in anesthesia, including the barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and non-barbiturate induction drugs.

    6. Examine the indication for the use of various induction agents, local anesthetics, anticholinesterase and anticholinergic drugs, muscle relaxants, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    7. Discuss the effect of psychopharmacological therapy, chemotherapy, nutritional therapy and antiepileptic drugs upon anesthesia care.

    8. Discuss the effect and appropriate choice of antibiotics and antiviral agents utilized in surgical care.

    9. Examine the effects of multiple drug regimes on patientís health and the impact on the anesthetic plan of care.

    C. Major Topics

    Date Topic

    8/27/09 Vasoactive

    9/3/09 Inhaled Anesthetics

    9/10/09 General principles: Pharmacodynamic, Pharmacokinetics

    9/17/09 IV Induction Agents: Barbiturates, Propofol, Ketamine, Etomidate, Benzodiazepines

    9/24/09 Local Anesthetics

    10/1/09 Neuromuscular Physiology & NMB

    10/7/09 Neuromuscular blocking agents

    10/15/09 Opioid agonist and antagonists

    10/22/09 Anticholinesterase drugs & Cholinergic agonists, & anticholinergics

    10/29/09 Nonsteroidal Anti inflammatory agents

    11/5/09 CNS agents: depressants, psychotroics

    11/12/09 Anaphylaxis & drug interactions

    Prostaglandins, Plasma Kinins, Rennin and Serotonin. & Histamine receptor agonists

    11/19/09 Antibiotics and Antiviral agents

    12/3/09 Chemotherapeutics, Nutritional supplementation & hyperalimentation Vitamins & minerals & herbals

    Blood Components, substitutes and heomostatic drugs

    D. Textbooks

    Required Text:

    Stoelting, R. K. , Hillier, S.C. (Eds.). (2006). Pharmacology and physiology in anesthesia practice. (4th ed.). Philadelphia: Elsevier Health Sciences.

    Nagelhout, JJ., Zaglaniczny KL (Eds). (2005) Nurse Anesthesia (3rd ed). Philadelphia: Elsevier Health Sciences.

    Recommended Text:

    Barash, P. G. (Eds.). (2005). Clinical Anesthesia (4th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams Wilkins.

    Keir, L. B. & Dowd, C. S. (Eds.). (2004). The chemistry of drugs for nurse anesthetists. Park Ridge, IL: AANA Publishing.

    Miller, R. D. Cucchiara, R. F., & Miller, E. D. (Eds.). (2004

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Selected Journal Articles:

    Jablonka, D.H., & Davis, P.J. (2005). Opioids in pediatric anesthesia. Anesthesiology Clinics of North America. 23(4), 621-634.

    Chernin, E.L. (2004). Pharmacoeconomics of inhaled anesthetic agents: considerations for the pharmacist. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy. 61, 18-22.

    Golembiewski, J. (2004). Considerations in selecting an inhaled anesthetic agent: case studies. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy. 61, 20-17.

    Eger, E.I. (2004). Characteristics of anesthetic agents used for induction and maintenance of general anesthesia. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy. 61, 3-10.

    Marsala, M., Herreran, M.P., Kakinohana, O., Nakamura, S., Marsala, J., & Tomori, Z. (2005). Measurement of peripheral muscle resistance in rats with chronic ischemia-induced paraplegia or morphine-induced rigidity using a semi-automated computer-controlled muscle resistance meter. Journal of Neurotrauma. 22(11), 1348-

    Web Sites Resources

    Physicianís Desk Reference (online)

    http://www.pdr.net/Home/Home.aspx

    Palm Source

    www.palmsource.com

    Mayo Clinic: Anesthesia Drugs

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/anesthesia

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Grading:

    A = 93-100%

    B = 84-92%

    C = 75-83%

    D = 67-74%

    F = 66% & below

    A grade of B or better must be achieved in order to progress in the graduate program.

    Evaluation Methods:

    Quizzes: 15%

    There will be 5 written quizzes throughout the semester based on weekly readings and prior lectured material. The lowest quiz grade will be dropped. There are no makeup quizzes offered.

    Exams: 65%

    Exam 1: Vasoactive, Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, inhaled anesthetics

    Exam 2: IV induction agents, Benzodiazepines & local anesthetics

    Exam 3: Neuromuscular Blockers, Anticholinestrases, Anticholinergics, Opioids

    Exam 4: NSAIDS, CNS agents, prostaglandins, rennin, kinins, histamine agents

    Exam 5: Antibiotics, Chemotherapeutics, nutritional, blood components.

    Each exam will be comprehensive from previous exams.

    Case Studies: 10%

    Each student will select a patient case study related to a unique pharmacological issue. The student will do a 15 minute presentation on the case in class.

    Web Assignment: 10%

    Each student will be given a topic and submit a paper to the blackboard discussion board. The paper should be concise (less than 4 pages) yet complete in APA format. The paper will be graded on content as well as APA style writing.

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    Grading:

    A = 93-100%

    B = 84-92%

    C = 75-83%

    D = 67-74%

    F = 66% & below

    A grade of B or better must be achieved in order to progress in the graduate program.

    Evaluation Methods:

    Quizzes: 15%

    There will be 5 written quizzes throughout the semester based on weekly readings and prior lectured material. The lowest quiz grade will be dropped. There are no makeup quizzes offered.

    Exams: 65%

    Exam 1: Vasoactive, Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, inhaled anesthetics

    Exam 2: IV induction agents, Benzodiazepines & local anesthetics

    Exam 3: Neuromuscular Blockers, Anticholinestrases, Anticholinergics, Opioids

    Exam 4: NSAIDS, CNS agents, prostaglandins, rennin, kinins, histamine agents

    Exam 5: Antibiotics, Chemotherapeutics, nutritional, blood components.

    Each exam will be comprehensive from previous exams.

    Case Studies: 10%

    Each student will select a patient case study related to a unique pharmacological issue. The student will do a 15 minute presentation on the case in class.

    Web Assignment: 10%

    Each student will be given a topic and submit a paper to the blackboard discussion board. The paper should be concise (less than 4 pages) yet complete in APA format. The paper will be graded on content as well as APA style writing.

    H. Attendance Policy

    Course Attendance at First Class Meeting Ė Policy for Graduate Students: For structured courses, 6000 and above, the College/Campus Dean will set the first-day class attendance requirement. Check with the College for specific information. This policy is not applicable to courses in the following categories: Educational Outreach, Open University (TV), FEEDS Program, Community Experiential Learning (CEL), Cooperative Education Training, and courses that do not have regularly scheduled meeting days/times (such as, directed reading/research or study, individual research, thesis, dissertation, internship, practica, etc.). Students are responsible for dropping undesired courses in these categories by the 5th day of classes to avoid fee liability and academic penalty. (See USF Regulation Ė Registration - 4.0101,

    http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/ogc%20web/currentreg.htm)

    Attendance Policy for the Observance of Religious Days by Students: In accordance with Sections 1006.53 and 1001.74(10)(g) Florida Statutes and Board of Governors Regulation 6C-6.0115, the University of South Florida (University/USF) has established the following policy regarding religious observances: (http://usfweb2.usf.edu/usfgc/gc_pp/acadaf/gc10-045.htm)

    In the event of an emergency, it may be necessary for USF to suspend normal operations. During this time, USF may opt to continue delivery of instruction through methods that include but are not limited to: Blackboard, Elluminate, Skype, and email messaging and/or an alternate schedule. Itís the responsibility of the student to monitor Blackboard site for each class for course specific communication, and the main USF, College, and department websites, emails, and MoBull messages for important general information.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Work deadlines will not be extended unless arrangements are made with the lead faculty prior to/or immediately after a class.

    J. Program This Course Supports

    Nurse Anesthesia


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    None



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