Apply to USF Now | Graduate Admissions | Events & Workshops | Giving to the Office of Graduate Studies

Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - LAE6339

Edit function not enabled for this course.


Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2003-05-15
Campus:
Submission Type:
Course Change Information (for course changes only):
Comments:


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2064 2003-05-22
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Secondary Education ED 17-24-000-00
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Joan F. Kaywell 43516 Kaywell@tempest.coedu.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    LAE 6339 Methods of Teaching Secondary English Language Art

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    4 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Meth. of Teach. Eng. Lang.
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    -

    Prerequisites

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    Balanced literary methods for integrating reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and critical thinking activities into a literature-based program for secondary school students. Note: This course has a field component of 36 hours.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    x

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    x

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    x

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    x


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    Create, describe, and justify a philosophy for the teaching of English.

    Employ a variety of stimulating instructional strategies that aid students in their development of reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing abilities.

    See the interrelationships of the English language arts with each other and with language and literature.

    Demonstrate experience in selecting, planning, and organizing for teaching English language arts.

    Utilize the professional literature and become proficient in the utilization of these materials in their teaching.

    Explore as many choices of methods and materials as possible so that individuals may develop their own unique styles of teaching.

    Ask questions at varying levels of abstraction.

    Understand the implications, both positive and negative, of their actions and decisions in the English classroom.

    Apply their knowledge of English content and teaching methodology in tutorial, small group, and total class instruction.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Student will be able to:

    Create, describe, and justify a philosophy for the teaching of English.

    Employ a variety of stimulating instructional strategies that aid students in their development of reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing abilities.

    See the interrelationships of the English language arts with each other and with language and literature.

    Demonstrate experience in selecting, planning, and organizing for teaching English language arts.

    Utilize the professional literature and become proficient in the utilization of these materials in their teaching.

    Explore as many choices of methods and materials as possible so that individuals may develop their own unique styles of teaching.

    Ask questions at varying levels of abstraction.

    Understand the implications, both positive and negative, of their actions and decisions in the English classroom.

    Apply their knowledge of English content and teaching methodology in tutorial, small group, and total class instruction.

    C. Major Topics

    The Teaching of English: The Teacher, the Student, the School and the Classroom Environment

    Teaching Language: Spelling, Vocabulary and Grammar

    The Effects of Language: Dialects and Slang, Propaganda, Advertising and the Media

    Teaching Writing as a Recursive Process

    Evaluating Writing: Revising and Conferencing

    D. Textbooks

    Zemelman, Steven; Daniels, Harvey; & Hyde, Arthur. (1993). Best Practice: New Standards for Teaching and Learning in America’s Schools. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

    Strickland, Kathleen & Strickland, James. (1993). Un-Covering the Curriculum: Whole Language in Secondary and Postsecondary Classrooms. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Publishers.

    Myers, Miles. (1996). Changing Our Minds. Urbana, IL: NCTE.

    Kohn, Alfie. (1999). The Schools Our Children Deserve: Moving Beyond Traditional Standards and Tougher Standards. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

    Beach, Richard & Marsha

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    H. Attendance Policy

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    J. Program This Course Supports


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.