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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - SPC6308

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2004-03-18
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  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    2007 2003-10-27
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Communication AS 1217000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Gil Rodman 9743025 grodman@chuma.cas.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    SPC 6308 Communicating Grief, Loss, and Illness

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Comm Grief, Loss, and Illness
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    -

    Prerequisites

    Graduate Standing

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    How illness and loss disrupt our stories of self and relationships and lead to construction of new stories, also cultural patterns of stories. Topics include critical illness and relationships, dying, bodies, emotions, caregiving, aging, and divorce.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    The course has been offered as a topics course on two occasions and is now part of the regular course rotation in the department.

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    The course is in demand from communication students as well as from graduate students in education, sociology, medical ethics, and anthropology. It is a requirement of the new medical ethics MA program. Enrollment has ranged between 12 and 20 students.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    Yes, two times.

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Ph.D. in Communication or closely related field.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    This course will encourage us to cultivate the ability to read illness narratives within a dialectic of intimacy and distance. As we read, watch, and discuss stories, we will move back and forth among being in the immediacy and concreteness of the story--the physical body, emotional experience, and cognitive details; to considering how a story relates to our own lives--experienced, imagined, or foretold; to examining the rhetorical and social aspects of the story as told; to analyzing cultural patterns in illness stories.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Outcomes will consist of the ability to read illness narratives within a dialectic of intimacy and distance. Students will learn to respond from the immediacy and concreteness of the story; to consider how a story relates to our own lives--experienced, imagined, or foretold; to examine the rhetorical and social aspects of the story as told; to analyze cultural patterns in illness stories.

    C. Major Topics

    Why Study Illness Narratives

    The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics

    Experiencing Illness: The Case of Mental Illness, Rape, Alcoholism, Critical Illness, Breast Cancer, and AIDS

    Critical Illness and Intimate Relationships

    Illness and the Self

    Caregiving

    Experiencing Grief and Loss

    Separation and Divorce

    Living with Stigma

    Aging and Loss

    D. Textbooks

    Ellis, Carolyn. 1995. Final Negotiations: A Story of Love, Loss, and Chronic Illness. Philadelphia: Temple

    Frank, Arthur. 1991. At the Will of the Body: Reflections on Illness. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin

    Frank, Arthur. 1995. The Wounded Storyteller: Body, Illness, and Ethics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Kaysen, Susanna. 1993. Girl, Interrupted. New York: Vintage Books

    Lorde, Audre. 1987. The Cancer Journals. California: Aunt Lute Books.

    Knapp, Caroline. 1996. Drinking: A Love Story. New York: The Dial Press.

    Raine, Nancy. 1998. After Silence: Rape and My Journey Back

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    H. Attendance Policy

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    J. Program This Course Supports


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.