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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - LAE5640

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2007-11-08
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  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    1625 2007-10-18
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Secondary Education ED 172400
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Jane Applegate 9740383 applegat@tempest.coedu.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    LAE 5640 Classroom Communication in English Education

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 D - Discussion (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Classroom Comm in English Ed
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    -

    Prerequisites

    none

    Corequisites

    none

    Course Description

    Identifies characteristics of classroom communication environment; offers insights, info, instructional strategies designed to help you become effective classroom communication managers. Emphasis on role of media & non-print texts in students’ lives.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    This course is part of the M.A.T. in English Education and has been offered as a Special Topics. The course needs it’s own prefix,number, and title.

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    The course is part of a required sequence in the major: M.A.T. in English Education

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    yes, 4 times

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    The instructor needs to have a doctoral degree in English Education or a relevant field.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The College of Education is dedicated to the ideals of Collaboration, Academic Excellence, Research, and Ethical Practice. These are key tenets in the Conceptual Framework of the College of Education. Competence in these ideals will provide candidates in educator preparation programs with skills, knowledge, and dispositions to be successful in the schools of today and tomorrow.

    Speech Communication Association’s Standards for Speaking, Listening, and Media Literacy--Fundamentals of Effective Communication Listening list the following goals and objectives that students are expected to accomplish:

    Competent communicators demonstrate knowledge and understanding of . . .

    1.The relationships among the components of the communication process, especially in relationship to the historical development of language and its usage.

    2.The influence of the individual, relationship, and situation on communication.

    3.The role of communication in the development and maintenance of personal relationships.

    4.The role of communication in creating meaning, influencing thought, and making decisions.

    Competent communicators demonstrate the ability to . . .

    5.Demonstrate sensitivity to diversity when communicating.

    6.Enhance relationships and resolve conflict using appropriate and effective communication strategies.

    7.Evaluate communication styles, strategies, and content based on their aesthetic and functional worth.

    8.Show sensitivity to the ethical issues associated with communication in a democratic society.

    Speaking: Competent speakers demonstrate . . .

    9.Knowledge and understanding of the speaking process.

    10.The ability to adapt communication strategies appropriately and effectively according to the needs of the situation and setting.

    11.The ability to use language that clarifies, persuades, and/or inspires while respecting differences in listeners backgrounds.

    12.The ability to manage or overcome communication anxiety.

    Listening: Competent listeners demonstrate . . .

    13.Knowledge and understanding of the listening process.

    14.The ability to use appropriate and effective listening skills for a given communication situation and setting.

    15.The ability to identify and manage barriers to listening.

    Media Literacy: Media literate communicators demonstrate . . .

    16.Knowledge and understanding of the ways people use media and non-print media in their personal and public lives.

    17.Knowledge and understanding of the complex relationships among audiences, media, and non-print media content.

    18.Knowledge and understanding that media and non-print media content is produced within social and cultural contexts.

    19.Knowledge and understanding of the commercial nature of media and non-print media.

    20.The ability to use media and non-print media to communicate to specific audiences.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Students will :

    •Describe the nature of the communication process

    •Identify basic principles of interpersonal communication

    •Practice communicating directions clearly

    •Practice three basic skills involved in effective listening

    •Identify characteristics of "community" and positive class climate

    •Develop strategies to tap students’ creative, logical, and critical thinking skills

    •Develop strategies to Teach students to work productively in a small-group setting

    •Make literature and other textual material come alive through oral readings

    •Use instructional technology as an aid to one’s communication efforts

    •Learn about the characteristics and influence of film in the classroom

    C. Major Topics

    Students will participate in several lively, engaging instructional activities aimed at improving personal—and students’—speaking and listening skills. We will explore many aspects of classroom communication, including ways to establish a positive classroom climate; principles of interpersonal communication; small-group discussion; oral interpretation of literary texts; characteristics and influence of the mass media; the concept of doublespeak in its many forms; the use of technology as a way to improve the accuracy and effectiveness of one’s communication efforts. Since classroom communication occurs daily in all classes in all subjects, this course is pertinent and valuable for USF students and teachers of all disciplines working at either the middle or high school levels.

    •Describing the nature of the communication process

    •Identifying basic principles of interpersonal communication

    •Learning how to communicate directions clearly

    •Practicing three basic skills involved in effective listening

    •Establishing a sense of "community" and a positive class climate

    •Developing students’ creative, logical, and critical thinking skills

    •Teaching students to work productively in a small-group setting

    •Making literature and other textual material come alive through oral readings

    •Using instructional technology as an aid to one’s communication efforts

    •Learning about the characteristics and influence of film in the classroom

    D. Textbooks

    Cooper, Pamela J. & Cheri Simonds.(2006). Communication for the Classroom Teacher (8th edition). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    H. Attendance Policy

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    J. Program This Course Supports


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.