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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - GMS6XXX

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2009-06-03
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  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    1547 2009-02-23
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Graduate Affairs MD 6108
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Michael J. Barber, D.Phil. 9749908 mbarber@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    GMS 6XXX Functional Approach to Diabetes and Coronary Heart

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Diabetes and CHD
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    -

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    The course examines specific aspects of diabetes and coronary heart disease critical to understanding factors that result in degraded cardiovascular tone and the cellular mechanisms that control carbohydrate metabolism and their role in various diseases.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    This course is a component of the new concentration in Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine that is part of the Medical Sciences program in the College of Medicine. The course is designed to extend the basic and clinical science skills of physicians and oth

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course is valuable to practicing clinicians and other health-care professionals who are interested in further developing their patient care skills in the fields of diabetes and coronary heart disease. Previous presentations of this material have attracted enrollments of over 200 participants and this enrollment is expected to be maintained.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    This course has not been previously offered at USF as a selected topic. However, portions of the course have been previously offered 4 times as part of a CME program for experienced clinicians.

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    All of the faculty involved in the course are experience M.D. or Ph.D. faculty with extensive experience in teaching medical and graduate students and clinical residents.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The course objectives include:

    • Understanding the glycemic index and its use in determining the glycemic index and glycemic load of various foods

    • Identifying patients with Syndrome X/metabolic syndrome

    • Discussing nutritional supplements and lifestyle recommendations for treatment of the components of metabolic syndrome

    • Establishing a treatment course and being able to treat patients with insulin resistance, diabetes, and diabetic neuropathy

    • Discussing risk factors for heart disease including elevated cholesterol panel and fractionation of cholesterol panel (LPP/VAP test)

    • Examining interventions for chronic endothelial inflammation

    • Understanding the role of inflammation in cardiovascular inflammatory disease

    • Discussing other risk factors for heart disease including elevated homocysteine, lipoprotein (a), ferritin, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein

    • Discussing free radical production, glycation, and oxidation and the application to patient treatment

    • Understanding the causes of endothelial dysfunction

    • Identifying and evaluating botanical treatments to augment the care of insulin resistant patients

    • Evaluating the link between oxidative stress and glycemic control

    • Discussing which laboratory tests to order and utilize to properly evaluate insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and risk factors for heart disease

    • Describing the role insulin has in the development of hypertension

    • Critically evaluating nutritional treatments for hypertension

    • Interpreting laboratory evaluations to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease risk factors

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Following the successful completion of this course, particpants will be able to:

    • Discuss the glycemic index and its use in determining the glycemic index and glycemic load of various foods

    • Identify patients with Syndrome X/metabolic syndrome

    • Discuss nutritional supplements and lifestyle recommendations for treatment of the components of metabolic syndrome

    • Develop a treatment course and be able to treat patients with insulin resistance, diabetes, and diabetic neuropathy

    • Discuss the risk factors for heart disease including elevated cholesterol panel and fractionation of cholesterol panel (LPP/VAP test)

    • Develop interventions for chronic endothelial inflammation

    • Understand the role of inflammation in cardiovascular inflammatory disease

    • Discuss other risk factors for heart disease including elevated homocysteine, lipoprotein (a), ferritin, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein

    • Discuss free radical production, glycation, and oxidation and the pplication to patient treatment

    • Understand the causes of endothelial dysfunction

    • Identify and evaluate botanical treatments to augment the care of insulin-resistant patients

    • Evaluate the link between oxidative stress and glycemic control

    • Discuss which laboratory tests to order and utilize to properly evaluate insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and risk factors for heart disease

    • Describe the role insulin has in the development of hypertension

    • Critically evaluate nutritional treatments for hypertension

    • Interpret laboratory evaluations to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease risk factors

    C. Major Topics

    Major course topics include:

    Understanding primary cardio-metabolic risks and the various natural treatment options available as therapies for cornonay heart disease.

    Identifying and discussing specific case studies that emphasize the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome and the function of various hormones including growth hormone and insulin.

    Examining the various types of interaction between insulin, fatty acids and trace metals.

    Review of the relationship between the actions of the various hormones and lipolysis and glycogenolysis.

    Discussion of the role of methyl donors, such as betaine and their role in gastric function and heartburn.

    Reviewing the use and misuse of salivary cortisol measurements in the diagnosis of obesity and chronic stress.

    Reviewing the major laboratory tests that can be utilized to assess the physiological status of the aging patient.

    Identify targets for potential anti-aging therapy and discussing the methods currently available for genomic and proteomic testing.

    Reviewing the processes involved in genetic information transfer and the effect of polymorphisms on metabolism.

    Discussing new developments in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    Reviewing the status of a new emerging frontier, metabolic cardiology, and its role in the prevention and treatment of heart disease.

    Examining the properties of the metabolic substances that impact the heart, such as glucose and Mg2+.

    Reviewing the physiological roles of mitochondria, ATP production and utilization in metabolism.

    Discussing the topics of plaque reversal and plaque stabilization in cardiology.

    Comparing and contrasting the metabolic differences in professional athletes and recreational athletes.

    Examining the mitochondrial clock theory of aging.

    Discussing the effects of various common toxins encountered in common activities.

    Examining the effects of several detoxifying cocktails and nutraceuticals on human health.

    Discussing cancer gene tests and CanScan and reviewing the accuracy of the various cancer detection methods.

    Reviewing the epidemiology of hypertension.

    Discussing the hypertension syndrome and guidelines for lifestyle modification and its pharmacologic treatment

    Reviewing the biology of arteriosclerosis and vascular endothelial function.

    Exploring a variety of models of hypertension prevention including an extensive discussion of dietary factors, vitamins and flavonoids.

    Discussing the relevance of nutritional and natural supplement therapies for dyslipidemia.

    D. Textbooks

    Houston, M., “What Your Doctor Never Told You About Hypertension”. New York: Warner Wellness, 2003.

    Smith, P., “What You Must Know About Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs, and More”. New York: Square One Publishing, 2008.

    Marin-Garcia, J., “Aging and the Heart”, Springer Publ., 2008

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    H. Attendance Policy

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    J. Program This Course Supports


  5. Course Concurrence Information



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