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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - GMS6XXX

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2009-06-03
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  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    1542 2009-02-25
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Graduate Affairs MD 6108
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Michael J. Barber, D.Phil. 9749908 mbarber@health.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    GMS 6XXX Lab. Fund & Adjunct Cancer Therapies

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? Y
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Lab Fds & Adj Cancer Therapies
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    -

    Prerequisites

    None

    Corequisites

    None

    Course Description

    This course presents an extensive review of clinical laboratory fundamentals as part of the disease diagnosis process together with discussions of the therapies designed to reverse adverse cellular functions and adjunct therapies for cancer management.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    This course is a component of the new concentration in Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine that is part of the Medical Sciences Master's Program in the College of Medicine. The course is designed to develop clinician and health-care professional expertize

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This course is valuable to practicing clinicians and other health-care professionals who are interested in further developing their patient care skills by the efficient and accurate use of clinical laboratory data together with exposure to new and novel forms of cancer therapies. Previous presentations of portions of the course material have attracted an enrollment of over 200 participants and this enrollment is expected to be maintained.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    This course has not been previously offered as a selected topic in the College of Medicine. However, portions of the material have been previously offered as part of a CME program for experience clinicians.

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    All of the faculty involved in the course delivery are experienced M.D. or Ph.D. faculty with extensive experience in teaching medical and graduate students and clinical residents.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    The major course objectives include:

    •Discussing advanced integrative approaches to cancer therapies.

    •Exploring clinical approaches to structural imbalances.

    •Describing a basic understanding of how clinical lab tests are performed in regenerative medicine.

    •Discussing what determines test result accuracy, sources of error and what is involved in the management of quality assurance systems in a clinical laboratory.

    •Understanding how reference ranges are established and displayed.

    •Understanding organic acid metabolism and how this relates to evaluating nutrient insufficiency and toxic imbalances.

    •Describing how to evaluate a patient’s level of oxidative stress.

    •Understanding how urinary porphyrin analysis can evaluate functional effects of environmental toxins.

    •Discussing how to evaluate a patient’s level of vitamins, minerals, and toxic metals.

    •Understanding the use and advantages of DNA identification of stool microbes.

    •Describing the use of genomic analysis in the management of patient health risks.

    •Discussing how to evaluate patient levels of phthalates and other bioactive plasticizers and how this can affect steroid hormone interactions and potential health risks.

    •Describing how the analysis of stool microbes, chemistry, immunology and enzymology can be used to evaluate and treat intestinal disorders.

    •Preparing treatment plans for psychiatric illnesses from a regenerative medicine approach.

    •Discussing nutritional support programs for the competitive athlete.

    •Describing the role that nutrients play in the treatment of psychiatric illness.

    •How to write prescriptions for exercise plans for healthy patients and those with special needs.

    •Discussing new treatment modalities in the area of sports medicine from a regenerative medicine approach.

    •Exploring how to reduce a patient's exposure to extensive use of prescription medication.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    Following the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    •Discuss advanced integrative approaches to cancer therapies.

    •Explore clinical approaches to structural imbalances.

    •Describe a basic understanding of how clinical lab tests are performed in regenerative medicine.

    •Discuss what determines test result accuracy, sources of error and what is involved in the management of quality assurance systems in a clinical laboratory.

    •Understand how reference ranges are established and displayed.

    •Understand organic acid metabolism and how this relates to evaluating nutrient insufficiency and toxic imbalances.

    •Describe how to evaluate a patient’s level of oxidative stress.

    •Understand how urinary porphyrin analysis can evaluate functional effects of environmental toxins.

    •Discuss how to evaluate a patient’s level of vitamins, minerals, and toxic metals.

    •Understand the use and advantages of DNA identification of stool microbes.

    •Describe the use of genomic analysis in the management of patient health risks.

    •Discuss how to evaluate patient levels of phthalates and other bioactive plasticizers and how this can affect steroid hormone interactions and potential health risks.

    •Describe how the analysis of stool microbes, chemistry, immunology and enzymology can be used to evaluate and treat intestinal disorders.

    •Prepare treatment plans for psychiatric illnesses from a regenerative medicine approach.

    •Discuss nutritional support programs for the competitive athlete.

    •Describe the role that nutrients play in the treatment of psychiatric illness.

    •Write prescriptions for exercise plans for healthy patients and those with special needs.

    •Discuss new treatment modalities in the area of sports medicine from a regenerative medicine approach.

    •Explore how to wean a patient successfully off of prescription medication.

    C. Major Topics

    Major course topics include:

    •Describing the manifold factors affecting laboratory test result reliability.

    •Discussing the range of indicators of laboratory test reliability, including accuracy, precision, sensitivity and specificity.

    •Examining the causes of variability in standard laboratory test results.

    •Reviewing quality control, assurance and best practices.

    •Defining “normal” laboratory data.

    •Discussing the various tools and methods utilized in obtaining laboratory test results.

    •Discussing methodologies for toxic element assessment

    •Reviewing the components of whole blood and use in element level determinations

    •Comparing and contrasting the results of blood, hair and urine analyses.

    •Classifying amino acids by shared biophysical characteristics.

    •Identifying common symptoms associated with amino acid deficiencies.

    •Reviewing strategies for amino acid analyses and supplementation in clinical practice.

    •Identifying causes of amino acid insufficiency and its assessment.

    •Reviewing the biochemical utilization of amino acids and differentiate between essential and non-essential amino acids.

    •Discussing the urea cycle and its role in nitrogen metabolism.

    •Identifying essential amino acids for protein synthesis and energy generation.

    •Discussing the evaluation of amino acid insufficiencies and correction processes.

    •Identifying various organic acids and the value of an organic acid patient profile.

    •Discussing the value of assessing organic acid levels in clinical practice.

    •Examining the development and evaluation of an organix comprehensive profile.

    •Reviewing selected case studies and the application of organic acid testing.

    •Identifying the types and structures and review the metabolic roles of fatty acids.

    •Identifying fatty acid and micronutrient deficiencies commonly evaluated by fatty acid profiles.

    •Reviewing signs and symptoms associated with fatty acid abnormalities.

    •Examining the standard American diet from a fatty acid perspective.

    •Reviewing the use of nutrients (natural versus synthetic) in cancer therapies.

    •Identifying alternate nutrients that cause apoptosis.

    •Reviewing the potential effects of diet modification following disease diagnosis

    •Examining the relationship between nutrients and radiation effects.

    •Extensively discussing the role of nutritional support for cancer patients.

    •Reviewing the biosynthesis and metabolic roles of porphyrins.

    •Discussing the physiological effects of inherited porphyrias.

    •Reviewing selected case studies focusing on porphyrin metabolism and the use of porphyrin profiles.

    •Discussing a model for integrative cancer therapy.

    •Reviewing the results of chemotherapy and extended survival

    •Discussing the different causes of cancer cell proliferation.

    •Reviewing chemotherapy mechanism of action.

    •Discussing selected novel comprehensive protocols for the treatment of advanced stage cancer.

    •Identifying and review four major obstacles to cancer therapy.

    •Discussing selected cancer case studies with particular emphasis on nutritional protocols.

    D. Textbooks

    The course features four required textbooks that focus on the diverse array of course topics. Supplemental material for the course will also be provided to enhance understanding via the course Blackboard site.

    “Laboratory Evaluations for Integrative & Functional Medicine”, Bralley, J.A., 2nd Ed.

    “Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients”, Blaylock, R., Twin Streams / Kensington Publishers.

    “Eating Cancer with Nutrition”, Quillin, P., Nutritional Times Press Incorporated.

    “Break Your Prescribed Addiction”, Shalley, B., Pain & Stress Publ. - ISBN: 889391-27-1.

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    H. Attendance Policy

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    J. Program This Course Supports


  5. Course Concurrence Information



- if you have questions about any of these fields, please contact chinescobb@grad.usf.edu or joe@grad.usf.edu.