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Graduate Course Proposal Form Submission Detail - RCS6459

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Current Status: Approved, Permanent Archive - 2010-04-06
Campus: Tampa
Submission Type: Change
Course Change Information (for course changes only): Change title from Substance Abuse 2 to Professional Skills for Addictions Counselors
Comments: Grad Council approved 2/15/10; SCNS Liaison notified 4/6/10


  1. Department and Contact Information

    Tracking Number Date & Time Submitted
    1532 2009-09-11
     
    Department College Budget Account Number
    Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling BC 1257000
     
    Contact Person Phone Email
    Sandy Reynolds x 9750 sreynold@bcs.usf.edu

  2. Course Information

    Prefix Number Full Title
    RCS 6459 Substance Abuse 2

    Is the course title variable? N
    Is a permit required for registration? N
    Are the credit hours variable? N
    Is this course repeatable?
    If repeatable, how many times? 0

    Credit Hours Section Type Grading Option
    3 C - Class Lecture (Primarily) R - Regular
     
    Abbreviated Title (30 characters maximum)
    Substance Abuse 2
     
    Course Online? Percentage Online
    C - Face-to-face (0% online) 0

    Prerequisites

    RCS 5450

    Corequisites

    Course Description

    An extension of RCS 5450 with emphasis on family problems and approaches to counseling and working with alcohol and other substance abuse.


  3. Justification

    A. Please briefly explain why it is necessary and/or desirable to add this course.

    Needed for program/concentration/certificate change

    B. What is the need or demand for this course? (Indicate if this course is part of a required sequence in the major.) What other programs would this course service?

    This is not a new course; we are requesting a title change on the course, which was previously Substance Abuse 2 in a sequence of 3: Substance Abuse 1, 2, and 3. Substance Abuse 1 is RCS 5450, a prerequisite for this course. Substance Abuse 2 and 3 are no longer being required to be taken in any specific order, so a more descriptive title is desired by the Department.

    C. Has this course been offered as Selected Topics/Experimental Topics course? If yes, how many times?

    No

    D. What qualifications for training and/or experience are necessary to teach this course? (List minimum qualifications for the instructor.)

    Upper-level degree in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling or related field.


  4. Other Course Information

    A. Objectives

    1. Acquire the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to be an effective substance abuse counselor.

    2. Become familiar with the continuum of practice dimensions including clinical evaluation, treatment, referral options, service coordination documentation, and education utilized in treating chemical dependency.

    3. Learn a variety of contemporary substance abuse counseling approaches

    4. Explore a range of issues related to “special populations.”

    5. Examine cultural, financial and social policy and issues related to substance use, abuse treatment.

    6. Acquire a better understanding of the numerous classes of psychoactive substance and treatment issues related to the specific classes of substances.

    B. Learning Outcomes

    1. Acquire the ability to clinically evaluate a client for substance abuse

    2. Write an individualized treatment plan including measurable goals and outcomes.

    3. Become familiar with a variety of community resources to best serve the substance abusing client and the skills and knowledge needed for case management and coordinate.

    4. Conduct a client assessment, manage a case, develop a treatment plan, and accurately document all client related data.

    5. Come to recognize issues related to client, family and community awareness and education regarding Substance Abuse

    6. Use and understand the theoretical rational to the various approaches to substance abuse counseling, including behavioral, cognitive, psychodynamic and social, and work towards developing a personal approach.

    7. Recognize the pros and cons of several issues related to substance abuse treatment including abstinence vs. non abstinence approaches, harm reduction approaches, the “war on drugs”, utilization of “Twelve Step” and other self help community support groups in treatment, managed care.

    8. Demonstrate an understanding of the range of issues and treatment approaches in the criminal justice system.

    9. Use acquired knowledge to individualize treatment for special populations such as co-occurring mental disorder, women, elderly, adolescents, gay, lesbian, bisexual community.

    10. Understand and practice ethical and behavioral standards for professional in substance abuse counseling.

    C. Major Topics

    Course Overview; Addictive Behavior: An Emergent Biopsychosocial / Interdisciplinary Model

    Continuum of Substance Abuse Treatment: Individual, Inpatient; Therapeutic Community; Structured Partial and Outpatient

    Psychoactive drugs: history and classification

    Strategies for Screening, Assessment, Diagnosis and Referral

    Countertransference and Attitudinal Barriers

    Heredity, Environment and Psychoactive Drugs

    Defense Mechanisms

    Self-Help/12 Step Approaches BB Discussion

    Financial and Public policy

    Modern War on Drugs

    Case Conceptualization, Treatment Planning, Treatment,

    Case management and Service Coordination

    Documentation

    Coerced vs. Voluntary Care

    Effectiveness of Treatment

    Uppers: amphetamines, cocaine, caffeine, nicotine

    Maintenance, Relapse, Relapse Prevention

    Downers: Depressants; opiates/opioids & sedative-hypnoticsWorking With the Problem Drinker:

    Harm reduction Models

    Brief therapy

    Drug Testing

    All Arounders: hallucinogens, psychedelics, marijuana and other cannabinols

    Treatment in the Criminal Justice System

    Drug Court

    Drug Maintenance Therapies

    Medical and Pharmacological Resources

    Special Populations

    Co-Occurring Mental Disorders and Disabilities

    Elderly

    Cultural Issues

    Gender Issues

    Women

    Children and Adolescents

    Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Community

    Student Workshop: Strength Based Helping Strategies

    Motivational Interviewing

    Solution Focused Therapy

    Stages of Change Models

    Treatment Obstacles

    Drug Abuse Prevention Methods and Challenges

    Community Education

    Managed Care, Cost, Insurance Coverage, Public Programs

    D. Textbooks

    Strausner, S.L.A. (ED) (2006) Clinical Work with Substance-Abusing Clients. NY: Guilford Press (Paperback) ISBN 1-59385-289-4

    Inaba, D.S. & Cohen, W.E. (2007) Uppers, Downers, All Arounders. Medford OR: CNS Publications ISBN 978-0-926-544-28-4

    TAP 21 Addiction Counseling Competencies http://ncadistore.samhsa.gov/catalog/ProductDetails.aspx?ProductID=13283VII (free download)

    E. Course Readings, Online Resources, and Other Purchases

    Kaufman, Edward (1994) Psychotherapy of Addicted Persons; The Guilford Press ISBN:0-89862-116-X

    F. Student Expectations/Requirements and Grading Policy

    Any assignments are to be either completed online or submitted via the Blackboard digital drop box and are to be in a Microsoft Word document. All papers/Blackboard discussions must be completed or you will receive an incomplete (I).

    In event of absence or lateness it will be your responsibility to get and complete the assignments. Assignments will not be accepted beyond the due date unless specific arrangements have been made. Papers need to be turned into the drop box – not via e-mail.

    5. Blackboard discussions (24%) The six discussions (1x weekly) are designed to encourage you to explore both sides of contemporary substance abuse issues. They are to follow a debate format. You do NOT necessarily have to agree with a position to take a stand on it. Your response to other students will be a counter argument to their stated position. A two or three line answer stating that “I agree with your position” is NOT an adequate response. You will receive NO credit for that type of response. Post are worth up to 2 points and response 2 points. Your post should be minimally a 200-250 word post supported by contemporary writings and research on the issues and your response a counterpoint supported by current research and writings.

    6. Individual Workshop (30%); Each student will be responsible for conducting, with other class members, a “workshop” for the class on a specific assigned topic in substance abuse treatment. These are the topics in the Course Outline Schedule on specific dates. Your task will be to help students to develop knowledge and new competencies in the content area. The focus is to be on specific treatment/counseling considerations. Current research to supplement assigned text and articles as well as field research is desirable and grading will reflect this effort. A good workshop design is an art and I encourage you to be creative. You may conduct this “workshop” in whatever style you deem appropriate, including lecture, debate, demonstration, role play, guest speaker, handouts, slides, video and/or experiential exercises. If you so choose to secure a guest speaker they need to be an experienced counselor in the content and the time allotted should not comprise the entire class period. You will need to identify at least three learning objective for the assigned topic (i.e. what the participants will do.) The workshop should be comprised approximately 1.5 hours of class time.

    7. Case Conceptualization and Treatment Planning (46 %). One primary and several secondary case studies (special populations) will be presented online. “Treatment teams” will discuss these cases, brainstorm and then develop relevant individualized treatment plans for each scenario. Additionally other relevant real life problems, client issues and dilemmas in addictions counseling will be discussed in the BB discussion format, providing an opportunity for application of the theoretical problems to real life issues.

    VIII. Grading and Evaluation:

    In order to move on to the next sequence of courses, you must pass this course. You must receive an "A " or a "B. A "C" is considered a failing grade. As any method of assigning grades related to training and the education of students in basic counseling skills as well as class participation and presentations is ultimately subjective.

    1) Blackboard Discussions 6 @ 24 points (4 each)

    2) Case Studies, Client Problems and Treatment Plan - 46 points

    3) 1 Workshop - 30 points

    Total Possible Points = 100

    A = 91-100

    B = 81-90

    G. Assignments, Exams and Tests

    MAY 14 CLASSROOM MHC 1617

     Course Overview; Addictive Behavior: An Emergent Biopsychosocial Model

    • Strausner: Chapter 1 Assessment and Treatment of Clients with Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Problems Overview pp. 3-38

     Modalities of Substance Abuse Treatment: Individual;

    Inpatient; Therapeutic Community; Structured Partial and Outpatient

    • Washton, A. W. (ED) Chapter 15-16. pp. 285-313. Is psychotherapy Effective for Substance Abusers. In Psychotherapy and Substance Abuse (1995) (See BB)

     Psychoactive Drugs: History and Classification

    • Inaba, D.S. & Cohen, W.E.: Uppers Downers all Arounders: Chapter 1 Psychoactive drugs: History and Classification;

    MAY 16 CLASSROOM MHC 1617

    • Strategies for Screening, Assessment, Diagnosis and Referral

    • Washton, A. W. (ED) Chapter Chapter 2 pp. 23-54. Clinical Assessment of Psychoactive Substance Use. In Psychotherapy and Substance Abuse (1995) (See BB)

    • Buelow, G. & Buelow, S. ( 1998) Psychotherapy in chemical dependence treatment: A practical and integrative approach, Chapter 2, Practical Decisions in Assessment and Referral, pp. 45-92 (See BB)

     Countertransference and Attitudinal Barriers

    • Kaufman, W (1994) Chapter 8 Countertransference and Other Mutually Interactive Aspects of Psychotherapy with Addicted Persons (see BB)

     Heredity, Environment and Psychoactive Drugs

    • Inaba, D.S. & Cohen, W.E.: Uppers Downers all Arounders: Chapter 2

    MAY 21 ONLINE

     Defense mechanisms BB

     Kaufman, E. (1994) Psychotherapy of addicted persons, Chapter 3 Defense mechanisms in addicted persons pp. 47-59.

     Self Help/12 Step Approaches BB

    • Strausner (2004) : Chapt. 6, pp. 125-145

    • Washton (1995); Psychotherapy and Substance Abuse

    • The Guilford Press Chapter 6, 7 pp. 124-160 (See BB)

    • Emrick, C. D. (1998). Alcoholics anonymous and other twelve-step groups. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 22 (5), 925-939.

    MAY 23 ONLINE

    Professional and Ethical Responsibility

    Florida Certification Board Chapter 6 pp 131-160 (See BB)

    Modern War on Drugs BB Discussion

    MAY 28 CLASSROOOM MHC 1617

    • Case Conceptualization, Treatment Planning, Documentation and Treatment

     Buelow, G. & Buelow, S. (1998) Psychotherapy in chemical dependence treatment: A practical and integrative approach, Chapter 3, Case conceptualization, treatment planning, and treatment pp. 93-123 See BB

     Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (1995). The Role and Current Status of Patient Placement Criteria in the Treatment of Substance Use Disorders. pp. 5-9, 11-16 (pp. 17-22 optional). Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series #13. Rockville, MD: US Department of Health and Human Services.

    • Case Management, Documentation and Service Coordination

    • Florida Certification Board Chapter 4-5 pp. 97-130 (See BB)

    • Johnson and Johnson (2003) Real World Treatment Planning (SEE BB)

    • Uppers

     Inaba, D.S. & Cohen, W.E.: Uppers Downers all Arounders: Chapter 3

    • Effectiveness of Treatment

    • www.cdc.gov/IDU/facts/ExpectationsFin.pdf

     http://www.nationaloutcomemeasures.samhsa.gov/accomplishments.asp

     http://oas.samhsa.gov/2k9/txpredictors/txpredictors.cfm

     www.pmatch.org

     http://ncadi.samhsa.gov/govstudy/f027/drug.aspx

     Project MATCH Research Group. (1993). Project MATCH: Rationale and methods for a multisite clinical trial, matching patients to alcoholism treatment. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 17, 1130-1145.

    MAY 30 CLASSROOM MHC1617

     Student Workshop: Maintenance, Relapse and Relapse Prevention

     Strausner Chapter 7, pp. 146-168

     Marlatt, G.A., Barrett, K., & Daley, D.C. (1999). Relapse prevention. In Galanter, M. & Kleber, H.D. (Eds.) Textbook of substance abuse treatment (2nd edition) pp. 353-366. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Press. (See BB)

     Downers: Depressants: opiates/opioids & sedative-hypnotics

    • Inaba, D.S. & Cohen, W.E.: Uppers Downers all Arounders: Chapter 4

    JUNE 4 CLASSROOM MHC 1617

     Student Workshops: Working with the Problem Drinker; Brief Therapy; and Solution Focused Therapy

     Harm Reduction

    • Strausner Chapter 3 pp 65-81

    • Berg, I.K. & Miller, S.D. (1992) Working with the problem drinker, W.W. Norton & Co. Introduction, pp. xi-xxii, Chapter 1 pp. 1-17, Chapter 5 pp. 68-93 (see BB)

     Brief Therapy

    • Washton. A.M. (1995) Chapter 11 pp. 204-223 (See BB)

     Coerced vs. Voluntary Care

    • Strausner Chapter 4 pp. 82-102

     All Arounders:

    • Inaba, D.S. & Cohen, W.E.: Uppers Downers all Arounders: hallucinogens/psychedelics, marijuana and other cannabinols

    Chapter 5

    JUN 6 ONLINE

     Treatment in the Criminal Justice System

    • Criminal Justice Services pp. 161-180 Florida Certification Board (See BB)

    • Belenko, S. & Puegh, J. (1998). Fighting crime by treating substance abuse. Issues in Science and Technology, Fall, 53-60

    • Gornik, M. (2001) Moving from correctional program to correctional strategy: Using proven practices to change criminal behavior. Offender Substance Abuse Report, July/August. pp. 60-64.

    • Peters, R. H., & Matthews, C.O. (in press) Jail treatment for drug abusers. In Leukefeld, C.G., Tims, F.M., and Farabee, D. (Eds), Clinical and Policy Response to Drug Offenders. pp. 1-25. New York: Springer Publishing Company. (See BB)

     Drug Court

    • Drug Court Clearing House and Technical Assistance Project. Summary assessment of the drug court experience. Washington DC

    • Drug Maintenance Therapies

    o BB Discussion Methadone

    • Medical and Pharmacological Resources

    • HIV and Aides

    • Strausner, HIV/Aides and Intravenous Drug Users: Issues and Treatment Implication pp 443-471

    JUNE 11 ONLINE

    Special Populations:

     Co-Occurring Mental Disorders, Personality Disorders and Disabilities

     Strausner Chapter 5 Assessment and Intervention with Clients Who Have Coexisting Psychiatric and Substance Related Disorders pp 103-124 and Chapter 16 Substance Abusers with Borderline Disorders pp370-391.

     Van Wormer, K. & Davis, D.R. (2003), Addiction Treatment: A Strengths Perspective, CA: Brooks/Cole Chapter 8 Substance Misuse and Coexisting Disorder or Disability pp 247- 274 See BB

    • Drake, R.E., Batels, S.J., Teague, G. B., Noordsy, D.L., & Clark, R.E. (1993). Treatment of substance abuse in severely mentally ill patients. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease,

    181(10), pp. 606-611. (optional)

    Mental Health and Drugs;

    Inaba Chapter 10 pp 513-548

     Racial Ethnic and Cultural Issues

     Van Wormer, K. & Davis, D.R. (2003), Addiction Treatment: A Strengths Perspective, CA: Brooks/Cole Chapter 10 Racial, Ethnic and Cultural Issues pp. 311- 333

     Older Adults

     Strausner Chapter 15 Substance Abuse Among Older Adults pp. 330-346

    June 13 ONLINE

     Women

    • Strausner Chapter 16 Assessment and Intervention with Alcohol and Drug Abusing Women pp. 347-369)

     Children and Adolescents

    • Strausner Chapter 14 Assessment and Treatment of Adolescent Substance Abusers pp 305-329

    • Center for Substance Treatments (1995). Treatment of adolescents with substance use disorders, pp. xv-xxvi, 9-25. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series # 32 Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of health and Human Services (optional)

     Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Community

    • Strausner, Chapter 18 Treatment of Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Substance Abusers pp 392-422

    • Van Wormer, K. & Davis, D.R.(2003), Addiction Treatment A Strengths Perspective, CA: Brooks/Cole Chapter. 11, Gender and Sexual Orientation Difference pp. 339-363 (optional) See BB

    JUNE 18 Classroom MHC 1617

    Student Workshop: Strength Based Helping Strategies; Motivational Interviewing; Stages of Change

    Strausner Chapter 2 pp. 39-64, Motivating Substance-Abusing Clients through the Helping Process.

    Van Wormer, K. & Davis, D.R.(2003) , Addiction Treatment: A Strengths Perspective, CA: Brooks/Cole Chapter 3, Strength based helping strategies pp. 66-90 See BB

    Washton (1995); Psychotherapy and Substance Abuse, The Guilford Press Chapter 9 pp. 179-190 See BB (optional)

    Miller, W. & Rollnick, S. (1991) Motivational interviewing, pp. 14-29, 51-63. New York: The Guilford Press (optional) See BB

    Prochaska, J.O., DiClimente, C.C., & Norcross, J.C. (1992) In search of how people change: Applications to addictive behaviors. American Psychologist, 47, 1102-1114 (optional) See BB

    JUN 20 CLASSROOM MHC 1176

    Student Workshops

    Public Policy

    Van Wormer, K. & Davis, D.R.(2003), Addiction Treatment: A Strengths Perspective, CA: Brooks/Cole Chapter 13, Strength based helping strategies pp. 401-413

    Managed Care, Cost, Insurance Coverage, Public Programs,

    Washton, A.M., & Rawson, R.A. (1999). Substance abuse treatment under managed care: A provider perspective. In Galanter, M. & Kleber, H.D. (Eds.), Textbook of substance abuse treatment. 2nd edition pp. 545-552. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Press See BB

    Community Education

    Drug Abuse Prevention Methods and Challenged

    Inaba Chapter 365-432 Drug Use and Prevention: From Cradle to Grave

    Prevention Chapter 8 Florida pp. 181-201 Cetrtification Board See BB

    H. Attendance Policy

    A. Class Format and Methods of Instruction:

    The basic context for meeting the above objectives for this course will involve regular attendance and active participation and interaction both in the classroom and online. It will involve lecture, student presentations, classroom discussion, and opportunities for experiential learning. You will need to complete out of class reading and project assignments and be prepared to enter into the class and online discussions and experience.

    B. Course Requirements / Assignments.

    1. Class Attendance and Participation Regular attendance and participation is essential. Classes begin at 6:00 p.m. and end at 9:30 p.m. on Thursday and at 9:00 a.m. and end at 12:30 pm on Saturday. Missing more than 30 minutes of a class will count as an absence. If you are unable to make a class you must notify me. More than one absence will result in a lower grade by one level and more than 2 is an F or I. To not loose attendance credit, verification from a physician will be required. You will still be responsible for submitting your written discussion response. Attendance at the last class is required. Absence from the last class will result in a lower grade by one level without verification of illness by a physician. The attendance policy is designed to accommodate illness or a personal emergency but is not meant to in any way suggest that students are “allowed” one cut. It is also designed to instill a sense of commitment to your course of studies, fellow students and a sense professional responsibility. Some of the classes will be held “online”. There will be specific assignments to be completed the weeks designated online. These assignments will need to be completed in a timely manner, as some will be interactional with other students.

    Students who anticipate the necessity of being absent from class due to the occurrence of a major religious observance must provide advance notice of the date(s) to the instructor in writing by the second class meeting.

    I. Policy on Make-up Work

    Any assignments are to be either completed online or submitted via the Blackboard digital drop box and are to be in a Microsoft Word document. All papers/Blackboard discussions must be completed or you will receive an incomplete (I).

    In event of absence or lateness it will be your responsibility to get and complete the assignments. Assignments will not be accepted beyond the due date unless specific arrangements have been made. Papers need to be turned into the drop box – not via e-mail.

    Students with disabilities are responsible for registering with Students with Disabilities Services in order to receive academic accommodations. SDS encourages students to notify instructors of accommodation requests at least five business days prior to needing the accommodation. A letter from SDS must accompany this request.

    • See Student Responsibilities – http://www.asasd.usf.edu/Student.htm

    • See Faculty Responsibilities— http://www.asasd.usf.edu/faculty.htm

    J. Program This Course Supports

    MA in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling


  5. Course Concurrence Information

    Restricted to majors.



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